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Belches, Burps, and Farts, Oh My! by Artie Bennett

Belches, Burps, and Farts, Oh My!
(Blue Apple Books, $17.99, Ages 4-8)
by Artie Bennett with illustrations by Pranas T. Naujokaitis

C’mon, admit it. When you were between the ages of 4 to 8, you cracked up at the occasional fart joke, right? So maybe bathroom humor is what some parents call it, but there’s no avoiding it if you have a young child. The fascination and preoccupation with – not to mention the reproduction of –  bodily sounds is hard for kids (and parents) to ignore. With Belches, Burps, and Farts, Oh My!, Bennett’s made learning about the noises that humans and animals emit not only interesting, but rip-roaring funny, too!

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Bennett’s latest nonfiction picture book is divided into parts, the first dealing with belches and burps in all their loud glory. Readers are shown the different things that cause belching such as fizzy drinks or eating too much. One fun fact I never knew, and will definitely have my son try out when the opportunity presents itself, is that ” … we cannot burp if on our backs.” And here’s an example of Bennett at his burp humor best:

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Interior spread from Belches, Burps, and Farts, Oh My! by Artie Bennett with illustrations by Pranas T. Naujokaitis, Blue Apple Books © 2014.

Can you belch your ABCs?

Demonstrate your ex-burp-tise!

 

In Part Two it’s time to grab a gas mask or clothes pin as the book explores flatulence aka “breaking wind”:

While burps and belches leave by mouth,

Farts will exit farther south.

Throughout the book, gaseous fumes are presented as a toxic looking green in Naujokaitis’ cartoon-style artwork. Some of the expressions he’s drawn are so spot on whether on humans or the animals that kids will get hysterical without even reading the text! We also learn that for some reason boys seem to enjoy discussing, even bragging, about bodily noise much more than girls. I’m not sure if it’s in their DNA, but feel free to leave a comment if you can attest to that statement’s accuracy.

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Interior spread from Belches, Burps, and Farts, Oh My! by Artie Bennett with illustrations by Pranas T. Naujokaitis, Blue Apple Books © 2014.

Did you know that, despite most animals producing farts, certain ones (jellyfish, sponges and anemones) cannot “cut the cheese?” Now that’s a relief, huh? And here are a few things to entertain friends with at your next get together: on average, humans fart 14 times per day, and it takes around 13-20 seconds for us to smell a fart after it’s been done giving the culprit enough time to move to the next shopping aisle in the supermarket.

So popular is the discussion of bodily noises, that we even have a multitude of descriptive words and expressions for this function including “cutting one,” “tooting,” “passing wind,” “passing gas,” “SBD (silent but deadly),” “letting one rip,” “bottom burp,” and a new one to me, “morning thunder.” I’d also be remiss if I left out the most popular, “He who smelt it, dealt it!”
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Interior spread from Belches, Burps, and Farts, Oh My! by Artie Bennett with illustrations by Pranas T. Naujokaitis, Blue Apple Books © 2014.

Bennett’s included Fart-tastic Facts & Burp-tacular Bits in the back matter so parents and kids can take a few minutes to catch their breath after lots of laughing. Here they’ll learn more about the science of farts, the effects of certain gas producing foods and what it’s like to burp in outer space. Thanks, Artie Bennett, for (f)artfully addressing a topic we often shy away from. You grab this gassy bull by the horn and ride with it! Speaking of bulls, “If the gas could be collected, the burps of ten cows over a year’s time could heat a small house for an entire year.”

As for me, I’m thinking there are certain advantages to having a gas stove and cats around the house.

– Reviewed by Ronna Mandel

See more art by Pranas T. Naujokaitis here.

Read a review here of Artie Bennett’s Peter Panda Melts Down.

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Mama Built a Little Nest by Jennifer Ward

Mama Built a Little Nest, written by Jennifer Ward and illustrated by Steve Jenkins, (Beach Lane/Simon & Schuster, $17.99, Ages 4-8), is reviewed today by Cathy Ballou Mealey.

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Mama Built a Little Nest written by Jennifer Ward and illustrated by Steve Jenkins, Beach Lane Books/Simon & Schuster, 2014.

Big, beautiful collage illustrations and a sweet rhyming text make MAMA BUILT A LITTLE NEST the perfect choice for young nature lovers and bedtime snugglers. Ward’s bouncy, playful sing-song text borrows from the familiar “Mary Had a Little Lamb” to introduce fourteen bird species that build an amazing variety of safe, cozy nests.

Each page zooms in close to a nest to reveal its special details. The cover features a weaverbird pulling layers of grass over, under, around and through its pear-shaped nest, hanging delicately from a thorny branch. Ward writes: Mama built a little nest/ She used her beak to sew/ a woven nest of silky grass/ the perfect place to grow. Those who want to know more will delight in the additional paragraph providing information about each species.

Jenkins, a Caldecott-honoree, brings his signature cut paper collage style in a manner that showcases Ward’s text without overwhelming it. His careful pairing of textures and color accents are bold but simple, depicting the birds and their habitats in realistic fashion. Jenkins makes the familiar birds like eagles, penguins and robins look as beautiful as the more exotic species like hornbills and swiftlets. Their nests are equally detailed and impressive.

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Interior spread from Mama Built a Little Nest written by Jennifer Ward and illustrated by Steve Jenkins, Beach Lane Books/Simon & Schuster, ©2014.

 

This book is a terrific introduction to nonfiction for little ones, and is also a welcome addition to classrooms and libraries. An author’s note shares the story that inspired the book, and offers online resources for more information.

 –       Reviewed by Cathy Ballou Mealey

Where obtained: I borrowed a copy from my public library. The opinions expressed here are my own.

 

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Best Valentine’s Day Books for Children Part 2: Hearts, How Do Lions Say I Love You? & More!

Read about: Hearts, How Do Lions Say I Love You?, Junie B. My Valentime, Born From The Heart & Will You Still Love Me If …?

 

Our Valentine’s Day Roundup Part 2 from Ronna Mandel♡
features a selection of faves for the whole family!

This Valentine’s Day, which also happens to be International Book Giving Day, is a perfect time to share books and share love. The picture books we’ve highlighted yesterday and today say I LOVE YOU in oh so many wonderful and creative ways.  The best part of Valentine’s Day is that, since it’s all about finding ways to demonstrate feelings of love and affection, you can read these books all year ’round and the message remains the same. There’s never a bad time to show someone how much you care. And inside the pages of a picture book, there’s lots of love to be found!

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Hearts by Thereza Rowe from Toon Books.

♥♥♥ Heartsby Thereza Rowe (Toon Books, $12.95, Ages 3 and up). The bold graphics in this First Comic For Brand New Readers will draw kids in and the heartwarming storyline will keep them interested. Penelope the Fox accidentally drops her heart into the ocean where all sorts of hazards await. However, a friendly chicken on top of a British double-decker befriends the fox and together they go in search of the lost heart. Will Penelope find the missing heart or will she find something else on her journey? Hearts is all hearts.

 

 

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How Do Lions Say I Love You? by Diane Muldrow with illustrations by David Walker, Golden Books.

How Do Lions Say I Love You?by Diane Muldrow with illustrations by David Walker ( A Little Golden Book/Random House Books for Young Readers, $3.99, Ages 2-5). It’s easy to see why your little ones will gravitate towards this charming story of all the different ways animals say “I love you.” With catchy rhyme, Muldrow introduces us to a hen saying “I love you” to her chicks with a cluck. She goes on to show us love-struck swans, giraffes, nightingales, peacocks, horses, elephants, lions, wolves, bears, cows and mourning doves.

 

Mourning doves like
to bill and coo.
And that’s how they
say I love you.

With its adorable, muted pastel colored illustrations, How Do Lions Say I Love You? is certain to please as it gently depicts the love shared in families with examples children will find hard to resist.

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Born From The Heart by Berta Serrano with illustrations by Alfonso Serrano, Sterling Children’s Books.

Born From The Heart by Berta Serrano with illustrations by Alfonso Serrano (Sterling, $14.95, Ages 3 and up). When I first glanced through my review copy of Born From The Heart, and its artwork spoke to me so strongly, I didn’t even have to read the story to get a sense that I was going to love this book. This picture book which presents the idea of adoption in the most captivating way, is one I am delighted to recommend to new parents. One of my favorite lines in the book is when the main characters Rose and Charlie visit the doctor to see how they might have a baby and the doctor tells them they need “1 pound of love, 2 cups of enthusiasm and 1 1/2 tablespoons of patience.” Soon Rose’s heart began growing as the couple awaited the arrival of their new baby. When the time was right, they flew far and wide and “crossed landscapes of unimaginable color” until they came to a little house in the middle of a green valley. Rose’s heart burst when she saw her little one. She “kissed the beautiful face one hundred million times.” Alfonso Serrano (the author’s brother) has captured the magic of that moment in an illustration so spectacular yet so simple. Rose is lying in the grass with her baby on top of her. The embrace is priceless. We cannot see Rose’s face, but feel her ecstasy.

Based on Berta Serrano’s experience adopting her son, Born From The Heart, is a truly magical, moving and empowering story for parents that I hope all adoptive parents will read and then share with their child when the time is right.

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Will You Still Love Me If …? by Catherine Leblanc with illustrations by Eve Tharlet, Minedition.

Will You Still Love Me If …?by Catherine Leblanc with illustrations by Eve Tharlet (Minedition, $16.99, Ages 3-8). Asking his mom lots of questions so many children have asked, Little Bear learns that there is nothing quite as forgiving and enduring as a mother’s love. Whether he tears his clothes, makes a mess, breaks his bed or looks horrendous, he wonders and “wants to be sure,” his mom will still love him. Will it be always and forever, he begins to ponder, even if one day she dies? With the most sensitively worded response, his mom assures him that he’ll still feel her presence. “But I’m still here and I’m not dead yet.” It’s true that youngsters have these thoughts and it’s great this picture book addresses them in a way that’s light and positive. “And what if one day you love someone else more than you love?” Little Bear is unrelenting. “More than you?” Mom asks. “That’s impossible! I might love someone in a different way …” This momma bear knows all the right things to say and is so genuine, loving and supportive that kids will love her just as much as Little Bear. Between the gorgeous artwork and the appealing prose, Will You Still Love Me If …? is the kind of book I would have felt comfortable reading to my kids when they were young and I didn’t have all the answers.


9780385373029.jpg.172x250_q85Junie B. My Valentime by Barbara Park with illustrations by Denise Brunkus (Random House Books for Young Readers, $5.99, Ages 3-7). Everybody’s favorite first-grader is back and better than ever in this hilarious sticker and Valentine’s book (30 are included!) with Junie’s VALENTINE acrostic-style take on Valentine’s Day. This companion book to the bestselling Junie B. Jones and the Mushy Gushy Valentime! isfilled with fun, original full-color cards just perfect to give out to classmates, friends and family. My favorite Valentine’s Day card – the one where Junie’s written “Will you B. my Valentime? YES or NO? YES ⃞ YES ⃞ (Ha! I did not draw a NO box! That’s hilarious!)” And it really is!
Why not make your own printable Valentine’s Day card by clicking here, too?

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