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Raymie Nightingale written by Kate DiCamillo

RAYMIE NIGHTINGALE
Written by Kate DiCamillo
(Candlewick Press; $16.99, Ages 10 and up)

 

Raymie Nightingale by Kate DiCamillo book cover

 

Reviewer Hilary Taber calls Raymie Nightingale, “A rare and hopeful song.” But after reading her review, you’ll discover, as with all DiCamillo’s books, it’s that and so much more

Raymie Clarke is preparing herself to enter the Little Miss Florida Central Tire competition. Her father has recently run off with a dental hygienist, and Raymie is determined to win so that he will see Raymie’s picture in a newspaper and will, of course, come back to his family. This is the initial plan, but like most plans it doesn’t turn out the way that Raymie originally intended. First of all she needs to learn how to twirl a baton in order to win the competition. It is during those baton twirling classes that she meets her “rancheros”, her new friends who become like family. Gritty, but sweet Beverly, and storyteller extraordinaire Louisiana, help her through this hard time. Maybe, just maybe, Raymie is more than just a little girl with a big dream to get her father to come home. Maybe, just maybe, Raymie is destined for adventures with her new friends that show Raymie that she is the hero of her own difficult time. Raymie finds that somewhere in her is a person who is stronger than the storms of life. She also learns that, with help from her friends, she can manage to make her way to a new life full of goodness and grace. It is a life that she could have never imagined when she began making her plans to turn things around. Kate DiCamillo delivers yet another wonderful novel that makes you believe again in the strong, incredible power of friendship and hope.

It is that rare quality of combining sorrow with sweetness that makes every book she writes life affirming. Every book is like watching a sweet spring creep over a winter world. Often as a children’s bookseller, I see an absolute faith placed in her books by the children who read them. Even though the story might be hard to read, the children show a willingness to take the journey with Kate. Time and time again I wonder what it is that they are feeling when they look at her books in their little hands. I think it’s something akin to knowing that she is telling them the truth. There is a certain peace in that. Kate tells us that life is hard, but you should always hope. Hope is real, hope is something to hold on to, hope is the stuff of life.

On a personal note I feel that Kate DiCamillo is the E.B. White of our generation. Like White she is adept in the art of condensing profound thoughts into short, but amazing sentences. I was honored to meet her recently and to have my copy of Raymie Nightingale signed. I think it’s worth noting that beyond the wonderful writing is a very brave writer. Kate has personally been through the very hard experience of having an absent father, and she has courageously taken up the task of writing about this time in her life. That had to be difficult. Ultimately I think her bravery in writing about this time in her life will help to heal others who have gone though something similar. So, here is to one amazing writer who is also incredibly resilient, just like Raymie.

Come back tomorrow to read Hilary’s interview with Kate DiCamillo to get the inside scoop.
Download a teacher’s guide here.
Download a book discussion guide here.

  • Reviewed by Hilary Taber
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Everything, Everything by Nicola Yoon

EVERYTHING, EVERYTHING
Written by Nicola Yoon
(Delacorte Press; $18.99, Ages 12 and up)

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⭐︎ Starred Review – School Library Journal

Madeline Whittier has read more books than you, but she hasn’t been outside her house for as long as she can remember. The protagonist in Nicola Yoon’s #1 New York Times Bestseller, Everything, Everything, lives an air-locked, filtered existence, with no outings and virtually no visitors, because she’s “basically allergic to the world.” She has Severe Combined Immunodeficiency, or “bubble baby disease.” While she could have grown to be a weird or bitter eighteen-year-old, it’s clear from the funny drawings and comments with which she annotates her life that she has remained sweet, optimistic and thoughtful.

Since Madeline’s father and brother were killed in an accident when she was a baby, Madeline and her mom are almost everything to each other. Then Olly moves in next door, with his all-black wardrobe, his parkour litheness, and his off-the-wall sense of humor. Madeline realizes she won’t really have everything unless she can leave her germ-free house and be Outside with Olly.

I enjoyed the unusual format of the book, its short chapters that don’t necessarily follow each other, the hand-written notes and drawings. Appropriate as well as charming, the format reinforces how Madeline feels about herself: “If my life were a book and you read it backward, nothing would change.” Before Olly, her “life was a palindrome — the same forward and backward.”

That being said, eventually sequence matters, and the real “Book of Maddy” — Everything, Everything — is different if read backward. In the interest of not giving away too much, I won’t tell you the questions the book made me ask beyond “What would it be like to be a bubble-baby?” But rest assured Yoon’s novel provokes other thoughts as well, about the nature of love, and risk, and life itself.

  • Reviewed by Mary Malhotra
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Llama Llama Gram and Grandpa by Anna Dewdney

LLAMA LLAMA GRAN AND GRANDPA
Written and illustrated by Anna Dewdney
(Viking Books for Young Readers; $17.99, 2 and up)

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The dedication in Anna Dewdney’s latest, Llama Llama Gram and Grandpa, reads “For grandparents everywhere, and the little llamas who love them.” And if you’ve got a little llama fan, this sweet tale of a first overnight away from home, is sure to delight.

Dewdney’s rhyme is impeccable and infectious and the premise relatable, making this new picture book the perfect read-aloud and go-to bedtime story for Grandparent’s Day on September 13th.

Mama Llama brings her son to spend the night with his grandparents.


“Mama’s picture in a frame.
Different. Also just the same.”

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Interior artwork from Llama Llama Gram and Grandpa written and illustrated by Anna Dewdney, Viking Books for Young Readers, ©2015.

 

But, as he settles in, little Llama realizes he’s forgotten to bring along his beloved plushy, Fuzzy Llama!

 

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Interior artwork from Llama Llama Gram and Grandpa written and illustrated by Anna Dewdney, Viking Books for Young Readers, ©2015.

Rather than dwell on Llama Llama’s disappointment and despair, Dewdney shows young readers all the fun activities he gets up to with Gram and Grandpa. There are some good distractions to be found; A ride on the tractor, pulling up carrots in the garden, woodworking, trying new foods and scanning the night sky, all destined to become cherished memories.

 

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Interior artwork from Llama Llama Gram and Grandpa written and illustrated by Anna Dewdney, Viking Books for Young Readers, ©2015.

It’s only when Gram spots tears at tuck in time that

“Llama’s lips begin to quiver.
Llama starts to shake and shiver.
Llama needs his Fuzzy near,
but FUZZY LLAMA ISN’T HERE!”

Grandpa comes to the rescue with a more than suitable substitute, his very own “special toy” from childhood to keep his grandson company. Content, cared for, and comfy, little Llama learns that a grandparent’s love can make any house feel like home. Dewdney’s empowering story and sympathetically illustrated characters combine to make Llama Llama Gram and Grandpa my pick not only to allay the fears of any reluctant overnighter, but ultimately to celebrate the joys of grandparenting.

  • Reviewed by Ronna Mandel

 

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Music Class Today! by David Weinstone

 MUSIC CLASS TODAY!
Written by David Weinstone
Illustrated by Vin Vogel
(Farrar, Straus and Giroux BYR; $17.99, Ages 1-3)

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– reviewed today by Cathy Ballou Mealey

Young readers are assured of a toe-tapping, page-turning good time in MUSIC CLASS TODAY!, a new picture book from the hip creator of the toddler pop-culture sensation Music for Aardvarks and Other Mammals, David Weinstone. Weinstone’s interactive preschool music program has been joyfully translated into book form, capturing all the egg-shaking, scarf-tossing, stick-tapping excitement that little ones love.

As children gather eagerly for the start of music class, one young lad hangs back. Staying near his mother and clutching a cheery stuffed frog, he watches as the class begin to whirl, twirl, and dance along with the teacher’s song. Each child participates in his or her own way, whether jiggling, flopping or listening. Vogel perfectly captures all the energy and chaos of distractable little kids who yawn, sing, stretch, suck their fingers, or check their noses while jamming to the beat.

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Interior artwork from Music Class Today! by David Weinstone with illustrations by Vin Vogel, Farrar, Straus Giroux ©2015.

The narrator proceeds smoothly through the rhyming song/story, remaining calmly observant of the rolling eggs, flying shoes, and racing around pandemonium. His unmistakable goal is to reassure the young boy that he can join in when the moment is right. A gentle refrain “That’s all right, that’s okay. Whenever you’re ready, come on over and play,” punctuates the tale regularly.

As expected, the hesitant observer gradually warms to the idea of participating in the class. He smiles, stands up, dangle-dances his froggy to the music, then gradually picks up a pair of cymbals to join in a jubilant parade. “Everybody’s in the band. Hooray!” sings the teacher. After helping clean up the instruments and sing goodbye, the little music-maker and his frog are reluctant to leave and eager to return.

Vogel’s illustrations are dazzling and fun, endowing each child with a unique personality and vibrant striped or polka-dotted outfits with fabulous colorful socks. My favorite kid had a single front tooth and sported a green googly-eyed dinosaur ushanka.

Paired with a free download of Weinstone’s musical version of the song, the tale’s catchy plink-plunk beat is absolutely infectious. The publisher offers an activity kit (PDF) with supplemental activities including a coloring page, word match, iron-on decal, and directions for making simple instruments from recycled materials. MUSIC CLASS TODAY! is sweet, simple musical fun for the littlest of book and music lovers!

 

  • Reviewed by Cathy Ballou Mealey

 

Where Obtained:  I received a copy of MUSIC CLASS TODAY! from the publisher and received no other compensation.  The opinions expressed here are my own.

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ALLY-SAURUS & the First Day of School by Richard Torrey

Ally-saurus & the First Day of School
Written and illustrated by Richard Torrey
(Sterling Children’s Books; $14.95, Ages 3-6 )

Starred Review – Publishers Weekly

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Even dinosaurs get starting school jitters, in fact, maybe even those who are actually little girls pretending to be dinosaurs.

“Do you think there will be other dinosaurs in my class?” asked Ally-saurus.
“I think you’re going to make a lot of new friends,” said Mother.

Introducing Ally-saurus, an enthusiastic, pig-tailed little girl with an active imagination. At first it seems that making friends will not be easy. None of Ally-saurus’ classmates chomp their snack with fierce teeth or “ROAR!” like she does. Instead they eat quietly much to Ally-saurus’ surprise. She was expecting everyone to be wild about dinos just like her.

Torrey cleverly uses black and white plus a lot of shading in his illustrations so the snippets of color that he adds stand out and really a make a statement. For example, a pink tail and ridges crayoned onto Ally-saurus throughout the book indicate that Ally is imagining herself as a Stegosaurus. Later, Robert is the first classmate to get his hint of blue color as he imagines himself to be an astronaut when he and Ally-saurus cut out nameplate designs for their cubbies. During a lesson on the weather followed by one about letters, three princesses begin voicing their opinions as gold crowns and dresses are outlined on them.

Then, at lunchtime Ally-saurus is told by these princesses that:

“These seats are saved for princesses, not dinosaurs,” said Tina.
“You’re not a real princess!” roared Ally-saurus.
“You’re not a real dinosaur,” said Tina.
“Then why am I eating dinosaur food?” asked Ally-saurus.
“That’s baloney!” said Tina, and the other princesses giggled.

Ally-saurus is left to sit alone elsewhere until she is joined by several other students, all eager to share what they enjoy pretending to be. “Soon the whole table was roaring and chomping.” It isn’t long before Ally-saurus and the kids from her lunch table are running around during recess playing make-believe and having a blast. Ally-saurus realizes too that dinos and princesses can find common ground over pretend cups of tea.

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Reprinted with permission from Ally-saurus & the First Day of School © 2015 by Richard Torrey, Sterling Children’s Books, an imprint of Sterling Publishing Co., Inc. Illustrations by Richard Torrey.

Best of all, in the school library, (my favorite place), Ally-saurus along with her classmates discover there are books about all kinds of things … including bunnies. And guess who’s got a pink bunny tail and bunny ears drawn on when she hops out of bed the next morning? Note: There’s an unassuming little bunny lamp on a night table in the last illustration. Plus, Torrey has cleverly covered the endpapers in front with dinos and at the back with bunnies, something I only noticed on the second read! That’s sure to make children want to go back again and again to look for more details.

Add Ally-saurus & the First Day of School to your back-to-school list for an ideal picture book to share with youngsters. It’ll help them realize they’re not the only ones who get nervous starting school. It’s also a great way to start the conversation about the give and take necessary to form and keep friendships.

– Reviewed by Ronna Mandel

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