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Our Fave New Children’s Books We Love for Father’s Day

 

FATHER’S DAY BOOKS

∼ A Roundup ∼

 

 

REVIEWS:

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You're The Coolest Dad in the Box cover shaped book with dad and kid hammers.YOU’RE THE COOLEST DAD IN THE BOX
Written by Rose Rossner
Illustrated by Gareth Williams 
(Sourcebooks Wonderland; $9.99, Ages 0-3)

This fun new addition to the USA Today bestselling Punderland series of board books is perfect for Father’s Day. Little DIYers may not grasp some of the puns but they will be able to grasp the die-cut handle to carry around the book like a pro. Parents or caregivers can easily explain the wordplay while trying to make up their own. The illustrations help demonstrate the pun. The below stanza depicts a level sitting on a shelf.

You’re on another level,
how you balance sweet and cool.
No one else measures up
to the ways you rock and rule.

The pleasing personified tools in the art reinforce the message of love and admiration a child has for their dad, and the rhyming test makes this an ideal read-aloud to celebrate fathers year round. You’re The Coolest Dad in The Box also makes a great new dad gift.

 

Boxer Baby Battles Bedtime! cover baby wearing boxing gloves in crib.BOXER BABY BATTLES BEDTIME!
Written by Mia Wenjen
Illustrated by Kai Gietzen
(Eifrig Publishing; $18.99 HC, $12.99 Paperback, Ages 3 and up)

This baby is not going down easily and puts up an impressive fight (a kid-friendly boxing match that is) to avoid taking a nap in this adorable picture book. Wenjen’s created a relatable tale with a twist ending that will delight children and parents alike.

Inspired by her own experience boxing, the author cleverly infuses the sport’s popular terminology to tell this funny story conveyed in three rounds. Readers can find the spot-on idioms in a glossary in the back matter along with Wenjen’s author note.

I didn’t notice the pup carrying the round cards until halfway through my first read and appreciated how the story is broken down that way. I don’t want to give away too much by saying what each round consisted of, but suffice it to say, Boxer Baby gives it her all and then some! She is determined to be the last baby standing which means Dad will face a challenging nap time.

The artwork by debut picture book illustrator, Gietzen, brings energy to the story and contrasts the child’s raging emotions against those of her calm and accommodating father. While there’s no referee, there’s the humorous voice of the narrator describing the battle that Boxer Baby undertakes when her mom goes out. This homage to the endurance of the stay-at-home dad reminds me of my husband. While he held down a job, he always remained a hands-on father at home, never shirking his parenting responsibilities just like Boxer Baby’s father. I admire this exhausted dad’s fortitude. So who do you think will be the winner?

 

Daddy Tell Me a Story cover girl asking father for bedtime story.DADDY, TELL ME A STORY
Written by Kathleen Long Bostrom
Illustrated by Ela Smietanka
(WorthyKids; $18.99, Ages 4-7)

Kathy Bostrom is a storytelling pro. She is adept at capturing a child’s perspective and her latest picture book is no exception. In this charming story, readers meet a dad and his daughter at bedtime. When she asks for a story and he replies which one, she tells him he can make it up. “You always tell the best stories!”

And so the tale weaving begins. The father makes up a story about a queen and Sophie, the little girl, says, “Make her a princess.” He invents a pink unicorn as a character, but Sophie envisions a purple dragon with orange strips and golden wings. As the constantly revised bedtime story progresses, Daddy pretends to be scared eliciting warm reassurances from his spunky daughter. Together the pair work collaboratively as Sophie builds on what her father shares. He of course is amenable to helping in whatever way he can as the story evolves.

When the tale ends, Sophie decides that being a princess is boring. That’s when she comes up with a new ending sure to please everyone. Bostrom bookends this tale by having Sophie once again compliment her father’s storytelling ability before falling asleep. I’m glad Bostrom brought readers back to the beginning emphasizing the sweet daddy-daughter relationship and their storytime routine.

The engaging text marries nicely with Smietanka’s digital art. Colors are dazzling where they should be and become more muted as Sophie moves closer to drifting off. She’s incorporated upbeat elements into many of the spreads that children will enjoy noting. Bostrom encourages parents and caregivers to invite children to create their own story together.

 

Back Home: Story Time with My Father cover dad telling daughter a story.BACK HOME: Story Time with My Father
Written by Arlène Elizabeth Casimir
Illustrated by Ken Daley
(Candlewick Press; $18.99, Ages 4-8)

This is one of those books that invites multiple readings not only because of the engaging and touching lyrical text but also because the art reaches out and wraps you in its arms. I was pulled into this picture book about a young Haitian American girl, Lune, whose father’s stories are about his birthplace, his homeland or “lakay” a Haitian word meaning back home.

In the rich colorful stories of his childhood, the father recounts episodes from growing up in Haiti. They include humor like the boy falling on his bottom after attempting to get mangoes off a tree. “Sometimes the stories are memories … colored with joy and sorrow.” Such is the memory of his fierce and charming mother who did whatever it took to provide for her family. The medicine man story tells of how a family’s love and community can help an ill child as much or even more “than the medicine in his pouch.”

One particular spread stayed with me, lush with jewel tones depicting the girl imagining what “lackay” was like for her father. It was an unfamiliar land for her though it was brought to life by her father’s recollections. Golden light shines on her Mommy saying  it’s late and time to go to sleep but Lune is “going to wait for Daddy.” Her father holds multiple jobs, saving up for a house while also sending money home to his parents in Haiti. Yet, no matter how long he’s worked or how tired he is, Lune’s dad makes time to tell her stories, stories of “lackay.” Lune’s father’s tales have such a positive impact on her. The magic of a place she does not know but has experienced through her father’s stories has found its way to her heart and soon she will begin sharing stories of her own.

There is a Haitian glossary in the back matter as well as a page of Author’s Notes, one for Caregivers and Teachers and the other for kids. The first encourages “modeling and sharing our narratives.” The rewards are plentiful. Even though my parents grew up in the Bronx of the 1930s and 1940s and not the “lackay” of this story, I felt Casimir’s story spoke to me. I am grateful to know my parents’ stories and will continue to share them along with my own. The second note lets kids know they all have stories to tell. I hope this meaningful picture book will speak to all readers who can help their children understand how important stories are in our lives. Casimir’s motivating and caring words will hopefully prompt a new generation of storytellers.

 

WITH DADWith Dad cover boy and dad walking with fishing rods.
Written by Richard Jackson
Illustrated by Brian Floca
(Neal Porter Books/Holiday House, for ages 4–8)

Starred Reviews – Booklist, Kirkus, The Horn Book
A Junior Library Guild Gold Standard Selection

Brian Floca, Caldecott Medalist, and Sibert Honoree shares his interpretation of With Dad, a story written by the late editor and author Richard Jackson. Floca and Jackson had been making books together for over 25 years, but sadly Jackson passed away before the artwork had begun. That left many questions unanswered but ultimately it was decided to set the story in the early 1950s and I’m so glad about that decision. Not that it would not have worked set in the present, but the nostalgic quality of the art representing the era following WWII adds to the carefree ambiance and closeness of the main characters.

The picture opens with a boy on his dad’s lap helping to drive their Jeep through a small road in the woods. That illustration beautifully captures the special father-son relationship. The pair are heading towards a campsite where they’ll experience the great outdoors by setting up camp, digging a fire pit, fishing, and catching their dinner. The excitement the dad exhibits when his son reels in a fish is exhilarating. I love how that is contrasted with how the lad feels grossed out as he learns to gut the fish before frying it. His father adds, “You’ll see,” he said, “an owl might come for those tonight.” Naturally, we want to see that so Floca skillfully shows us the owl swooping in at the end of the story.

Throughout the book, readers see how the young boy looks up to his father. The father loves spending time with his son too. That’s especially evident in the scene where the dad says they’ll sleep back to back to stay warm. What a tender moment. The story then fast-forwards to the dead of winter. Readers learn the dad is serving in the war. The child fondly thinks back to that “famous fishing trip.” All he wants is for his father to return home safely so they can pick up where they left off that memorable last summer. While this story focuses on a boy whose father is in the military, children with a parent away for myriad reasons would find this heartfelt read rewarding and reassuring.

 

If You Run Out of Words cover dad in spaceship waving to daughter below.IF YOU RUN OUT OF WORDS
Written and illustrated by Felicita Sala
(Abrams BYR; $18.99, Ages 4-8)

Starred Reviews – Booklist, Kirkus

On the dedication page of this picture book, author-illustrator Sala writes: “To Nina, my dear girl, whose question inspired this book.” The question that the curious child in this story asks her father is a clever and interesting one.

“What happens if you run out of words? Will you have any left for me?” It makes sense that when a kid constantly sees their parent blah, blah, blahing away like the daughter in this story sees her father doing, she’d worry he might not have enough words left for her.

Needing reassurance just like the bunny gets from his mother in the classic The Runaway Bunny, the little girl in this story poses questions to her father that range from logical in the beginning to whimsical as the tale continues. This zaniness is matched by the colorfully saturated fantastical art that is a delight to explore. Sala’s illustrations for this book were made with gouache, ink, watercolor, colored pencils, and oil pastels and are full of emotion. Sometimes the body language and expressions on the father’s face cracked me up.

Funny scenarios ensue based on the questions the girl asks. Some children might love it when the dad visits Elves’ Word Factory determined to show his daughter the lengths to which he’d go to replenish his word supply. Others might like when the father is under the sea and a rescue boat run by pirate mice captures him and ties him up on their vessel. Following her father’s high-sea adventure, the girl wonders if her dad will have forgotten her. That’s when he tells her that no matter the length of the journey to return to her, forgetting her would simply be impossible. He shows her that he owns an infinite amount of words. In fact, it’s the three most important ones that he whispers in her ear to meaningfully end this captivating tale of devotion.

 

ADDITIONAL RECOMMENDED READS:

LIKE FATHER LIKE SON

HOW TO CATCH A DADDYSAURUS

MY DADDY IS A COWBOY

SUPERDADS! Animal Heroes

ALWAYS YOUR STEPDAD

THE I CAN SAY DADA BOOK

MERDADDY

 

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Tiffany Golden Interviews Amanda Davis, Author of Moonlight Memories

 

TIFFANY GOLDEN INTERVIEWS AMANDA DAVIS,

AUTHOR OF MOONLIGHT MEMORIES

Illustrated by Michelle Jing Chan

(WorthyKids; $17.99, Ages 4-7)

 

Moonlight Memories cover art girl holding teddy under moon

 

 

Publisher’s Summary of Moonlight Memories:

Discover how a young girl gains healing and hope as she processes the loss of a loved one in this beautifully sensitive story.
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… Whether children choose to use art as their outlet or find another way, the message is clear: they can carry the memories of their loved ones with them. An ending Note to Parents features guidance from a licensed children’s counselor about how to use the book and where to find additional resources. Written from a place of personal experience, this story strives to bring comfort to children hurting after loss.

 

INTERVIEW:

Tiffany Golden: Let’s start with a speed round…

  • Top three favorite children’s books of all time? This is such a hard one, so I’m going to default to recency here and say, If You Find a Leaf, written and illustrated by Aimee Sicuro (love the imaginative text and mixed media illustrations), Saving American Beach by Heidi Tyline King and Ekua Holmes (loved learning about the life of MaVynee Betsch and am a big fan of Holme’s gorgeous collage art), I Love You Because I Love You by Muon Thi Van and Jessica Love (love the sweet, lyrical text and Jessica Love is another favorite artist of mine). I also love Muon Thi Van’s other book, Wishes, illustrated by Victo Ngai (spare text yet so powerful in both words and imagery)!   
  • Coffee, tea (or neither)? Herbal tea all the way-caffeine makes me jittery! 
  • Where is your safe place? The ocean and anywhere with my pup.
  • Dogs, cats, (or neither)? I love all animals, but our pup Cora is the best. 
  • Early bird or night owl? Used to be a night owl but with an 18-month-old, I’ve been forced to take a serious look at my bedtime routine and have been making an effort to get to bed earlier as part of my self-care. 
  • Three words to describe what it takes to make it in the kidlit world … a big heart.

Okay, now down to the serious stuff….

TG: Please dish us the dirt on who you are and your journey into the fabulous world of children’s books. 

Amanda Davis: My love for art and writing stems back to my childhood. My father passed away when I was young, and I turned to art and writing to cope and process my emotions. This is what led me to teach art and later write and illustrate children’s books. I want to show kids the power in our stories-whether through writing, reading, or visual art. In 2012, I took a continuing education course at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, called, Illustrating Children’s Books, with illustrator Ilse Plume. This course was eye-opening for me and kick-started my career in kidlit. I realized that children’s books combine all three of my passions: art, writing, and stories. After completing that course, I dove headfirst into the craft of writing and illustrating for children (while balancing my job as a full-time high school teacher). I joined SCBWI, 12×12, and found a local and online critique group. I tried to soak in all the knowledge I could about the kidlit industry. I began to query literary agents and editors with a few of my stories. Looking back, I probably queried those stories too early, but hey, that’s part of the learning process. The story that finally landed me an agent and later a deal is my debut creative nonfiction picture book titled 30,000 STITCHES: THE INSPIRING STORY OF THE NATIONAL 9/11 FLAG, illustrated by Sally Wern Comport, which published in 2021 with WorthyKids/Hachette Book Group. 

 

Moonlight Memories int Spread1 Piper grieving
Interior spread from Moonlight Memories written by Amanda Davis and illustrated by Michelle Jing Chan, WorthyKids ©2023.

 

MOONLIGHT MEMORIES is my second picture book with the wonderful team at WorthyKids. The story is beautifully illustrated by Michelle Jing Chan and released earlier this month. This story holds a special place in my heart as it was inspired by my own personal experience with loss.

Amanda Davis and her dad when she was young
Amanda Davis and her dad when she was young.

As mentioned above, my father died when I was young. After his death, I was unsure of how to cope with this unexpected loss. I don’t remember many people talking to me about it or being given any resources to help me process. It wasn’t until I found art and writing that I was able to fully process the thoughts and emotions surrounding his death. I found my outlet. I found my voice. I soon realized that my father would always live on through the memories I was creating with my words and visuals.

MOONLIGHT MEMORIES tells the story of a young girl who is dealing with the loss of a loved one and finds comfort and healing through creativity. I have a third (unannounced) nonfiction picture book forthcoming that also has themes of loss and healing in it. Clearly, this is an important topic to me, ha! I hope my books can offer hope to readers and foster meaningful dialogue to help children process and heal from essential life events. 

 

TG: What inspires your work?

AD: My own experiences inspire my creativity. I like to write and draw about the things I’ve been through in my life (both joyous and difficult), the places I travel, people I meet, and the lessons I’ve learned. I’m inspired by kindness, nature, animals, and family. Often these aspects find their way into my work. Creativity is all around us, we just need to pay attention.

 

Moonlight Memories int Spread2 Mama face in stars
Interior spread from Moonlight Memories written by Amanda Davis and illustrated by Michelle Jing Chan, WorthyKids ©2023.

 

 

TG: What advice do you have for fellow kidlit creatives?

AD: There is no right or wrong way to get published. Each person’s story is different. Sometimes it’s a short, smooth journey, and sometimes it’s long and bumpy. Try not to compare. Instead, keep going. With every pass, send another query out. This industry has taught me not to take anything personally. You want to work with an editor or an agent who is going to love your work wholeheartedly. The truth is, not everyone is going to. And that’s okay. Art is subjective. With that in mind, there is strength in solidarity. This can be a very isolating business if we let it, so remember to reach out for help and to connect. The children’s book industry is one of the most welcoming communities I’ve been a part of. There is so much talent and wisdom. Connect with people. Ask questions. Never stop learning from one another. We are all on this creative journey together. 

AD: Thank you for interviewing me, Tiffany, and thanks for hosting us, Ronna! Thanks to all those for reading and supporting my work!

✦                                     ✦                                                                                                    ✦                                                 

TIFFANY’S THOUGHTS ABOUT MOONLIGHT MEMORIES:

This book is such a love letter to those experiencing a profound loss. This book found its way to our family soon after the loss of my sister. There’s a sweetness in looking to the sky and processing through art. The words are heartwarming, and the images are enchanting. This is one we’ll read over again.

 

BUY MOONLIGHT MEMORIES:

Local indie for signed copies (Upon checkout, type in the comments how you’d like the book personalized): https://www.buttonwoodbooksandtoys.com/page/moonlight-memories-amanda-davis

 

Amanda Davis Headshot Photo Credit Angela Wood Photography
Author Amanda Davis Photo Credit: Angela Wood Photography

AUTHOR BIO:

Amanda Davis is a teacher, artist, writer, and innovator who uses her words and pictures to light up the world with kindness. Amanda is the author of MOONLIGHT MEMORIES, 30,000 STITCHES: THE INSPIRING STORY OF THE NATIONAL 9/11 FLAG, and a yet-to-be-announced forthcoming titleShe also has poetry and illustrations featured in The Writers’ Loft Anthology: Friends & Anemones: Ocean Poems for Children. When she’s not busy creating, you can find her sipping tea, petting dogs, and exploring the natural wonders of The Bay State with her family and her rescue pup, Cora. You can learn more about Amanda at www.amandadavisart.com and on Twitter @amandadavisart and Instagram @amandadavis_art.

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INTERVIEWER BIO:

Tiffany Golden writes picture books, middle-grade, and YA fiction, mostly inspired by her experiences as a Black, disabled woman. She is also the winner of Lee and Low’s New Visions Award for 2021. She teaches creative writing to third-to-fifth grade students, is a member of SCWBI, and received the Judith Tannenbaum Teaching Artist Fellowship.

Find out more at www.tiffanygolden.com on Twitter @mstee13 and Instagram @tiffany.golden.13

WEBSITE AND SOCIAL MEDIA LINKS FOR AMANDA DAVIS:

Website: http://www.amandadavisart.com

Twitter: https://twitter.com/amandadavisart

Instagram: https://instagram.com/amandadavis_art

WEBSITE AND SOCIAL MEDIA LINKS FOR MICHELLE JING CHAN:
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Best New Books for Back-to-School 2021

10 BACK-TO-SCHOOL BOOKS

∼A ROUNDUP FOR 2021∼

 

 

backtoschool pencil clipart

 

 

Back-to school this year is not only the start of a new school year, for many it’s also a return to in-person learning in over a year. For others, it’s really the first time ever to attend daycare, preschool, or elementary school. This selection of ten assorted books highlights all the things that returning to school means for kids.

 

 

MEET YOUR SCHOOL!: An All About Me Book
Written by Cindy Jin

Illustrated by Melissa Crowton
(Little Simon; $7.99, Ages 1-5)

Cindy Jin’s upbeat 12-page school-shaped board book, Meet Your School!: An All About Me Book, features a variety of animals making their way through a school day. A nice overview is given of what kids can expect, from the main classrooms to the art room, gym, cafeteria, library, and music room. The rhyming couplets reinforce what can be found in each area: “The library is filled with books of all kinds / to teach and inspire bright, young minds.”

The illustrations by Melissa Crowton depict cute, colorful animals interacting happily in various situations. Each page has fun lift-the-flaps for further exploration. Overall, this book has a lot to discover while also providing a positive message as to what school is all about. – Review by Christine Van Zandt

 

HowtobeKindinKindergarten cvrHOW TO BE KIND IN KINDERGARTEN:
A Book For Your Backpack
Written by D.J. Steinberg
Illustrated by Ruth Hammond
(Grosset & Dunlap; $8.99; Ages 3-5)

 My eyes were instantly attracted to the colorful book cover illustration of an apple being shared on the school playground with a new friend, while classmates throw balls and glide down the slide, introducing readers to acts of kindness in How To Be Kind in Kindergarten: A Book for Your Backpack.

A book for your backpack is a perfect subtitle for this small hardcover book that reads rhythmically, teaching hidden lessons to kids first entering the new world of school. The fun-to-read story includes a diverse mix of abilities, races, and genders. Kids should have no problem finding themselves in one of Hammond’s realistic drawings.

Steinberg opens the story with the question, “Are you in kindergarten? Is that really true? How in the world did you get so big? So smart and funny, too!” The story moves into the classroom with posters of 1, 2, 3, and ABC so a child sees what a kindergarten classroom looks like. Kindness is threaded through each page as Steinberg points out, ‘Cause you’re the kind of kid who always shows you care.

This book shows kids what an impact they can make in their new school, whether cheering up a sad new friend or including a shy friend in a game. This truly is an ideal backpack book and should be read on the first day of school, the middle of the school year, and at the end of the school year because kindness is needed year-round. – Review by Ronda Einbinder

 

whats in dragons backpack coverWHAT’S IN DRAGON’S BACKPACK?
Written by Joan Holub

Illustrated by Christopher Lee
(Little Simon; $8.99, Ages 3-5)

The eye-catching cover of Joan Holub’s, What’s in Dragon’s Backpack? gleams with metallic dragon scales and the backpack-shaped 14-page board book has a cut-out handle just the right size for small hands. Inside, the fun rhyming couplets give us a glimpse of what Dragon’s got in there: “Stickers, charms, a message, and some homework that he fried. Oops!”

Each page has lift-the-flaps for further exploration adorned with Christopher Lee’s adorable art. The faces on his dragons, such as on the mock A Dragon’s Tale book, are top-notch. I also really like the subtle math lessons showing three flames equals one on-fire number three. Other teaching elements include groups of shapes that, once you peek beneath the flap, combine to make a sword.

Educational, interactive, and fun, this engaging book is sure to be a hit with kids who are starting school and donning backpacks. It can also be a conversation starter about what should be inside your child’s backpack to make school days a success. – Review by Christine Van Zandt

 

ISABEL AND HER COLORES GO TO SCHOOL
Written by Alexandra Alessandri
Illustrated by Courtney Dawson
(Sleeping Bear Press; $16.99, Ages 4-8)

It’s the first day of school, an English-speaking school, but Isabel only speaks Spanish. Isabel is a charming and irresistible main character and I cared about how she felt going into unknown territory, alone. Her reluctance is understandable. She doesn’t know English and is scared of what it will be like. Isabel sees things in gorgeous colors and through art and doesn’t realize how quickly she will pick up the new language. “English sounded wrong, like stormy blues and blizzard whites.” Isabel preferred the warm, cheerful colors of Spanish.

Ultimately her language learning is facilitated by one good friend but her limited grasp of English initially gets in the way. Isabel’s thoughtful art saves the day and new friendship blossoms. The interplay between Alessandri’s beautiful prose and Dawson’s flowing art makes every page a delight to behold. This cleverly presented bilingual picture book also includes Spanish to English translations in the back matter but for English speakers, most of the Spanish words can be understood in the context of the story. – Review by Ronna Mandel

 

My School Stinks! coverMY SCHOOL STINKS!
Written by Becky Scharnhorst
Illustrated by Julia Patton
(Philomel; $17.99; Ages 4-8)

School really does stink when one classmate is a skunk and the teacher is unBEARable. So, when little Stuart tells Mom his classmates are wild animals she says all kids are wild animals in debut author Becky Scharnhorst’s hysterical read-aloud with drawings by Julia Patton.

The originality of this story told in diary form starting on the first day of school and ending at Open House, when Mom and Dad realize they have sent their young child, Stuart, to a school full of animals, takes the reader through the first seventeen days of school. Stuart attempts to play along with his classmates when the monkeys hang him upside down. He’s then caught by Patricia the Porcupine pricking him with her many quills. Stuart journals P.S. The deep breaths still aren’t working. P.P.S. Neither are the happy thoughts P.P.P.S. I’m not going back tomorrow!

As Stuart continues to journal he also begins to make friends. Charlie the Crocodile apologizes for biting his fingers and becomes Stuart’s new best bud. This sweet story can be read for school storytime or by a parent before bed. I laughed on entry September 15 when Scharnhorst writes P.S. Mom doesn’t understand how a skunk got in the storage closet. I guess she’ll find out at Open House. I was anxious for Open House to find out how Mom and Dad would react to realizing they sent their child to the wrong school, but Stuart repeats what they told him on the first day of school Mom and Dad told me to take deep breaths and THINK HAPPY THOUGHTS. This was a great lesson for his parents. I just hope they let him stay friends with a crocodile! Patton’s detailed artwork adds to the whimsy with letters written on notebook paper and characters drawn with big teeth and round glasses. The P.S. notes were a fabulous extra touch. – Review by Ronda Einbinder

 

WE WANT TO GO TO SCHOOL:
The Fight for Disability Rights
Written by Maryann Cocca-Leffler + Janine Leffler
Illustrated by Maryann Cocca-Leffler

(Albert Whitman; $16.99, Ages 4-8)

Oh, how I’d love for this nonfiction picture book to be required reading in all schools! I could not believe as I read it that prior to President Ford signing the Education for All Handicapped Children Act (EAHCA) in 1975 with its Individualized Education Plan (IEP), children with disabilities did not have the right to a free, appropriate, public education. But the book really focuses on the lawsuit in 1971 called Mills v. Board of Education of the District of Columbia, the District Court ruling in 1972 that led to this important act being implemented, and the seven school-aged children and their families who made it happen.

We Want to Go to School is narrated by author-illustrator Cocca-Leffler’s daughter, author Janine Leffler, whose own inclusive experience as a student with Cerebral Palsy (CP) receiving various special assistance in school contrasts to what students prior to her would have experienced.  She explains how prior to the ’70s, students with disabilities either didn’t go to school, stayed in hospitals, or were sent to special schools at a huge expense to families. If they were allowed into some schools, these children were segregated in separate classrooms. There was little chance to interact with mainstream students. That is until Peter Mills, Janice King, Jerome James, Michael Williams, George Liddell, Jr., Steven Gaston and Duane Blacksheare decided they’d had enough of being left out. Of course, the schools objected, finding reason after reason why students with disabilities should not be able to attend. Their parents were having déjà vu.

Wasn’t public school supposed to be for everyone? Wasn’t that the lesson learned in Brown v. Board of Education in 1954 when segregation because of the color one’s skin was the issue. So the families fought back. They began to meet others facing the same school challenges and there was power in numbers. The news of the lawsuit spread so that pretty soon “more families joined the lawsuit.” It then became a class action suit. “18,000 students from the Washington, D.C. area were also not receiving a public education because of their disabilities.” Would the judge presiding over the case agree? YES! And the positive outcome of this lawsuit led to big changes for students with disabilities with “federal laws guaranteeing public education for all children.

I loved the energy of Cocca-Leffler’s art, especially the spread where she’s filled the page with faces of 1,000 kids and tells readers to imagine those 18,000 DC students, and the 8 million US students denied an education because they had disabilities. Powerful! Five pages of back matter include information on Disability Education Rights, a timeline, Author Notes, and an enlightening Note from Paul R. Dimond, Plaintiffs’ Attorney in the Mills v. Board of Education of the District of Columbia. I’m grateful for these change-makers. They paved the way for future students with disabilities who continue to benefit from their commitment to equal rights in education for all. – Review by Ronna Mandel

 

TheNightBaaforetheFirstDayofSchool coverTHE NIGHT BAAFORE THE FIRST DAY OF SCHOOL
Written by Dawn Young
Illustrated by Pablo Pino
(WorthyKids; $17.99, Ages 4-8)

The Night Baafore The First Day of School blends the counting element, the rhyme and hilarity of Sandra Boynton’s Hippos Go Berserk with the irresistible art of Mark Teague’s Pigsty. As the main character Bo—the star of two previous books I haven’t yet read—attempts unsuccessfully to fall asleep due to day-before-school-starts jitters, he calls on sheep to help. The catch is they make it more difficult to sleep with the ruckus they create. Poor Bo, aware of the hours slipping away, is desperate. He offers them a snack if they’ll stop, but when that doesn’t work he calls an emergency meeting. Only then a mysterious shadow of a monster appears further exacerbating the chaos. 

There’s as much for readers to enjoy in Young’s wild storyline as there is in Pino’s zany and action-packed illustrations. The counting of sheep from 1 to 10 as they get up to no good adds an engaging layer to the book. Then, reversing that to eventually count back down as it gets later and later, is such fun and a great way to involve young readers. I love how the 10 sheep all wear number necklaces to identify themselves. Kids may want to study each spread more closer upon further reads to see what each individual sheep is doing with the supplies Bo has prepared for his backpack. The massive mess is mighty fun to look at. Tension builds with each page turn as we wonder if Bo will get any shut-eye and manage to catch the bus to school. And the humor surrounding every sheep-filled episode encroaching on Bo’s time to sleep is a delight in this rhyming romp of a read-aloud. – Reviewed by Ronna Mandel

 

NORMAN’S FIRST DAY AT DINO DAY CARE
Written and illustrated by Sean Julian
(NorthSouth Books; $17.95, Ages 4-8)

Norman, a very small, almost invisible dinosaur compared to all the other dinos at Mrs. Beak’s play group, is shy. This may resonate with young readers experiencing a similar emotion when just starting school and being away from home. Julian’s rich artwork is charming in how it depicts Norman hiding (except his tail always adorably sticking out) in various situations where the text also states “he was very good at hiding.” In the beginning, before Norman makes friends, parents can ask children to see if they can spot him in the illustrations as he avoids interaction.

My favorite part of the picture book is when Norman confides in Mrs. Beak that he really wants to join the other dinos but feels shy. “It’s okay to be shy,” Mrs. Beak replied. “It’s a special part of who you are.” When she asks the dinos to perform in pairs, Norman teams up with big, loud Jake who despite his size, admits he’s rather nervous too. The two share a laugh and come up with a magical performance that not only satisfies (and perhaps comforts) children but provides the perfect conversation starter for parents and teachers to discuss shyness. I’m not sure it was deliberate, but I appreciated Mrs. Beak’s rainbow door and her rainbow mug, another welcoming feature to this warm and reassuring read. – Review by Ronna Mandel

 

SCHOOL IS COOL! (A Hello!Lucky Book)
Written by Sabrina Moyle
Illustrated by Eunice Moyle
(Abrams Appleseed; $16.99; Ages 5-9)

School Is Cool was written and illustrated by sisters Sabrina Moyle and Eunice Moyle founders of Hello!Lucky, their award-winning letterpress greeting card and design studio.

Targeting the child who has already had some school experience, this story begins on the beach where the rhinoceros, dog, and platypus are chilling out until they realize Tomorrow’s the first day of school! The expressive drawings tell it all when the dog almost drops his ice cream cone and the rhino jumps from his floatation device. The friends are worried kids won’t like your hair. Or how they talk. Or what they wear.

Eunice Moyle’s bold, captivating illustrations depict all sorts of animals arriving for their first day by school bus and bikes. They line up awaiting a handshake from the animal teacher, in popping bright greens and oranges and a happy yellow sun, a perfect complement to the welcome the smiling animals.

This book expresses the true feelings many kids have when it’s time to say goodbye to Mom and home now replaced by an unfamiliar teacher and classroom where they must learn the new rules. What if your teacher calls on you—and the answer is five, but you said … 2. It’s ok to say “I don’t know.” Everyone is here to grow.”

The back flap states that the Moyle sisters use their creativity and humor to inspire kindness, empathy, self-awareness, and service and in doing so dedicate this book to teachers everywhere. You are the coolest! Thank you for all you do! – Review by Ronda Einbinder

 

TWINS VS. TRIPLETS #1:
Back-to-School Blitz

Written by Jennifer Torres
Illustrated by Vanessa Flores
(Harper Chapters; HC $15.99, Paperback $5.99, Ages 6-10)

It looks like it’s going to be three times the trouble at school for David Suárez. With new neighbors, the Benitez triplets adding to what’s already an annoying presence by his other neighbors, the Romero twins, David must navigate third grade and not lose his cool. His goal after all is to be captain of the Globetrotters, the geography club, and that requires an uncluttered mind. Except the Benitez triplets and Romero twins are messing with him and everyone else.

When David is tasked with monitoring the playground (trouble maker prime turf), he fears it may be made off-limits for everyone if the five tricksters continue getting up to no good. And that is looking more and more likely when both sets of mischief-makers aim to rule recess with their pranks and pushy personalities.

This early chapter book, filled with humorous black-and-white illustrations, works well with its mix of Spanish words and expressions along with comments at the end of most chapters noting a reader’s progress. I like how Back-to-School Blitz includes a diverse group of students and some interesting geography information (David’s favorite subject) that ends up playing an important part in keeping the bullies in check. A couple of things jumped out at me like having the triplets together in one class which I thought wasn’t typically done. Another time, after causing a distraction, the triplets sneak out of class early without the teacher, Mr. Kim, noticing. But I’m an adult and if the kids reading this first book in a new series don’t mind, that’s great because as the book ends, there’s some unusual digging going on in the sandbox, and surely more pranks to come in book #2. – Review by Ronna Mandel

 

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Picture Book Review – 30,000 Stitches by Amanda Davis

30,000 STITCHES:

THE INSPIRING STORY OF THE NATIONAL 9/11 FLAG

Written by Amanda Davis

Illustrated by Sally Wern Comport

(Worthy Kids; $17.99, Ages 5-8)

 

 

30,000 Stitches cover

 

 

For those of us who are old enough, the story of 9/11 will never be forgotten. Horrible images are etched in our minds. But if we look hard enough, we will find beauty from the darkness of that day. 30,000 STITCHES documents some of those moments. It is THE INSPIRING STORY OF THE NATIONAL 9/11 FLAG

SUMMARY

Author, Amanda Davis, takes us on a thoughtfully worded journey of kindness and healing. The first image of the flag, vibrant and whole, blows above the wreckage, displaying the strength of America. The fabric ages and the tattered flag is stored away in the shed of a home. Seven years later, another tragedy hits, this time a natural disaster in Greensburg, Kansas. 

Volunteers from New York bring the flag all the way to Kansas at the people’s request, a connection to those who suffered a loss. From fragments of flags that survived the tornado, the 9/11 flag is rebuilt, and its journey across the states begins. With each new piece, a new story is told and remembered, representing hope, kindness, love, and strength. 

FIRST IMPRESSION

Chills. And with every page turn—more chills! Illustrator, Sally Wern Comport, creates lush fabric-like spreads, stitching together frames and collaged images, layering colors and textures of the complicated yet beautiful stories. At the beginning of the book, her mixed-media illustrations present New York City in soft tones of gray and muted greens and yellow, contrasted with dark bold cutouts—firefighter figures.  

30,000 Stitches int4
Interior spread from 30,000 Stitches written by Amanda Davis and illustrated by Sally Wern Comport, WorthyKids ©2021.

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The next page introduces the American flag in its familiar red, white, and blue. A few pages later, colorful images represent the uplifting message and diversity of the hands that stitched and mended the flag, and the hearts touched because of it.

 

CONCLUSION

The pictures and words of this book show humanity at its very best. 

30000 Stitches int5 scaled
Interior spread from 30,000 Stitches written by Amanda Davis and illustrated by Sally Wern Comport, WorthyKids ©2021.

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There is a flag that connects the kids of today to the historical moment of 9/11. It stands thirty feet wide and twenty feet tall, as big as my recommendation for this book.

 

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Cover Reveal, Interview + Giveaway for 30,000 Stitches by Amanda Davis

30,000Stitches cover

 

30,000 STITCHES: THE INSPIRING STORY OF THE NATIONAL 9/11 FLAG

Written by Amanda Davis  

Illustrated by Sally Wern Comport

Associate Publisher-WorthyKids/Hachette Book Group: Peggy Schaefer

 

 

Interviews:

30,000Stitches int3
The torn and tattered flag emerges after seven long years of waiting. Interior spread from 30,000 Stitches written by Amanda Davis and illustrated by Sally Wern Comport, WorthyKids ©2021.

 

GRWR: Thanks to you both for this revealing Q&A. I know I learned tons and am sure our readers did, too! 

2. Amanda is also giving away a 30-minute Zoom call for a picture book author or author-illustrator to discuss a current project and/or answer industry questions OR a 30-minute classroom visit for educators and librarians.

Get extra entries when you pre-order a signed copy of 30,000 Stitches from Silver Unicorn Bookstore here. Please DM a screenshot of the receipt to Amanda on Twitter @amandadavisart.

To enter this portion of the giveaway:

  • Retweet this post on Twitter
  • In the comments below, share a recent bright spot you experienced that gave you hope or joy. Please note that all posts are moderated prior to appearing so be assured your comments will be seen and posted and your name will be added to Amanda’s generous giveaway.
    Good luck!”  

Deadline to enter the contest is Thursday February 4th, at 5:00 PM EST. Amanda will announce winners on Friday, February 5th via Twitter. 

 

Amanda Davis headshot
Author Amanda Davis and Cora ©Angela Wood Photography

BIO:

Amanda Davis is a teacher, artist, writer, and innovator who uses her words and pictures to light up the world with kindness. After losing her father at the age of twelve, Amanda turned to art and writing as an outlet. It became her voice. A way to cope. A way to escape. And a way to tell her story. She was thus inspired to teach art and pursue her passion for writing and illustrating children’s books.

Through her work, Amanda empowers younger generations to tell their own stories and offers children and adults an entryway into a world of discovery. A world that can help them make sense of themselves, others, and the community around them. A world where they can navigate, imagine, and feel inspired—over and over again.

Amanda is the recipient of the 2020 Ann Whitford Paul—Writer’s Digest Most Promising Picture Book Manuscript Grant and teaches art at a public high school in Massachusetts where she was selected as 2020 Secondary Art Educator of the Year. Amanda is the author of 30,000 STITCHES: THE INSPIRING STORY OF THE NATIONAL 9/11 FLAG and has poetry and illustrations featured in The Writers’ Loft Anthology, FRIENDS AND ANEMONES: OCEAN POEMS FOR CHILDREN. When she’s not busy creating, you can find her sipping tea, petting dogs, and exploring the natural wonders of The Bay State with her partner and rescue pup, Cora. You can learn more about Amanda at www.amandadavisart.com and on Twitter @amandadavisart and Instagram @amandadavis_art.

 

Check out all the other websites on this exciting cover reveal blog tour.

MINIBLOGTOURGRAPHIC 30,000STITCHES

 

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Board Book Review – Will You Be Friends With Me?

WILL YOU BE FRIENDS WITH ME?

Written by Kathleen Long Bostrom

Illustrated by Jo de Ruiter

(WorthyKids; $7.99; Ages 3-7)

 

 

willyoubefriendswithme_cover

 

Life is much more fun with a friend! Author Kathleen Long Bostrom, and illustrator Jo de Ruiter, take young readers on a journey to meet all kinds of children who happen to share one very special thing in commonwanting a friendin Will You Be Friends With Me?

One girl with light curly hair and freckles wears glasses and likes to sleep late; her friend looks nothing like her with long straight brown hair and a blue headband, but their smiles are large and what matters most when they swing together on the playground. Two other girls visit the pool with one wearing floaties and looking apprehensive, while the other has no floaties and jumps feet first into the shallow end. Do you need to have the same swimming skills to be friends? Nope!
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WillYouBeFriendsWithMe int1
Interior spread from Will You Be Friends With Me? written by Kathleen Long Bostrom and illustrated by Jo de Ruiter, WorthyKids ©2020.

 

Turning the page, readers see friends who are messy and friends who are neat. Bostrom writes in rhyme, inviting the reader to join in with the uplifting beat. “I like salty. You like sweet. What’s your favorite treat to eat? And these stanzas cleverly end by asking “Will you be friends with me?” The repetition will be looked forward to and eagerly said aloud.

This 24-page story concludes with the featured kids lined up together entering their classroom. One boy is using crutches, a girl holds a soccer ball. Their open mouths indicate they have much to say to each other. Young readers see it’s okay to be different because “Life is much more fun that way.” With this theme, parents are given a good jumping-off place to begin conversations about kindness, diversity, and how our differences make life interesting and rewarding.

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WereAllDifferent Spread
Interior spread from Will You Be Friends With Me? written by Kathleen Long Bostrom and illustrated by Jo de Ruiter, WorthyKids ©2020.

 

Ruiter’s pastel-colored illustrations of the diverse children just being kids show that friends come in a variety of shapes, sizes, races, and abilities, and what matters most is including everyone because kindness is the only rule in being a friend.

This is a beautiful story about friendship, diversity, and acceptance. Kids learn the importance of being open to making friends with all kinds of children. Bostrom’s words are few but mighty, as she leaves us with deeper meaning. Will You Be Friends With Me? is a great bedtime story, and the perfect book to share at storytime for preschoolers and Kindergartners because a teacher can never have too many books stacked in the bookshelf about the importance of friendship and inclusion.

  •  Reviewed by Ronda Einbinder

Click here to order a copy of Will You Be Friends With Me?

Disclosure: Good Reads With Ronna is now a Bookshop.org affiliate and will make a small commission from the books sold via this site at no extra cost to you. If you’d like to help support this blog, its team of kidlit reviewers as well as independent bookshops nationwide, please consider purchasing your books from Bookshop.org using our affiliate links above (or below). Thanks!

Recommended Reads for the Week of 10/12/20

 

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Reasons to be Thankful – New Thanksgiving Board Books for Kids

THANKSGIVING 2019
∼A BOARD BOOKS ROUNDUP∼

 

free Thanksgiving Clip Art

 

 

look and be grateful bbcoverLOOK AND BE GRATEFUL
Written and illustrated by Tomie dePaola
(Holiday House Publishing; $7.99, Ages 0-3)

This sturdy board-book edition of the hardcover picture book from 2015 is great to share all year long. With just 24 pages of spare and inspiring text, dePaola’s peaceful, pleasing art takes center stage. The little boy on the cover wakes up to behold the beauty of a new day and the wonderful things that surround him. “Open your eyes, and see, and say thank you.” Children learn with each simple sentence and illustration to be present and look at each day as a gift. Look and be Grateful is a gentle and sweet introduction to mindfulness and gratitude which are never too early to share.

 

Be Thankful PoutPout Fish cvrBE THANKFUL, POUT-POUT FISH
by  Deborah Diesen
Pictures based on illustrations created
by Dan Hanna
(Farrar Straus Giroux BYR; $5.99, Ages 0-3)

Little fans of the beloved Pout-Pout Fish will be delighted he’s back, under the sea, serving up tasty dishes for Thanksgiving in Be Thankful, Pout-Pout Fish. Mr. Fish has invited friends and family from near and far to join him at the celebration. It’s a pot-luck dinner for which all of the guests are grateful. When the meal is over and everyone’s full, Mr. Fish is feeling especially thankful not only for the food, but for the full feeling in his heart.

Told in 12 full-color pages, this rhyming board-book makes a sweet addition to any toddler’s Pout-Pout Fish book collection. It’s also an ideal gift when visiting during the holiday. Dive into a copy and share today.

 

five little thank yous coverFIVE LITTLE THANK-YOUS
Written by Cindy Jin
Illustrated by Dawn M. Cardona
(Little Simon; $7.99, Ages 0-3)

I love the die-cut turkey feathers design of this 12-page board book. Inspired by the hand-print turkey art craft so many children proudly create at Thanksgiving time, each finger/feather in Five Little Thank-Yous represents a paper-cut illustrated spread devoted to a particular thank-you message. It starts off with “Thank you for this sweet, warm home, blessed with family all my own.” The four other feathers mention thanks for food, friends, love and “…most of all, I’m thankful to be the one and only, special me.” What a terrific and important message to impart to children at Thanksgiving.

 

 

T is for Turkey cvrT IS FOR THANKS (AND TURKEY!)
A Flanimals Book
Written by Melinda Rathjen
Illustrated by Amy Husband
(WorthyKids; $7.99, Ages 1-3)

Fab and felt-clad Turkey (on the cover) is just one of the adorable Flanimals animal characters in this 20-page cumulative concept board book.T is for Thanks (and Turkey!) explores themes of gratitude and friendship courtesy of the letter T. The story begins when Tiger gives Turtle some tulips in a tea pot as a gift. Such a lovely gesture! Sadly, the present breaks when Turtle sneezes. Turkey’s on hand to offer some tissues. In fact he humorously always wants to be included in the cumulative repetition that kids will love. “T is for Thanks and Tape and Thunderstorm. And Turkey!” Some tape mends the broken tea pot and Turkey’s wings keep the rain off Tiger while Turtle’s retreated into his shell.

It’s great how the friends get up to some fun antics that kids will relate to all while sticking to the letter T. Things get messy though when Turkey gets onto a trampoline with tacos given to him by Toad. That causes no end of trouble as you might imagine. But with caring, thoughtful friends, everything will work out in the end providing everyone (and Turkey!) is on good behavior.

This book provides many levels of entertainment and positive reinforcement whether it’s counting the tulips (three), noting with little ones how all the animals’ names begin with T, seeing what else they can spot in the art that might pertain to thankfulness and the letter T, and most importantly, seeing the kind way friends treat each other.

  • Reviewed by Ronna Mandel

Click here to read a review of another Thanksgiving book.

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