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Kids Picture Book Review – Where is My Balloon?

WHERE IS MY BALLOON?
Written by Ariel Bernstein
Illustrated by Scott Magoon
(Paula Wiseman Books; $17.99, Ages 4-8)

 

where is my balloon book cover

 

I became an Owl and Monkey fan after reading the hilarious I Have a Balloon so I was eager to read the second picture book featuring this adorable pair. In Where is My Balloon? by Ariel Bernstein with illustrations by Scott Magoon, Monkey’s looking after Owl’s adored red balloon and accidentally pops it while playing with it. Ooops!

 

Where is My Balloon int1
Interior spread from Where is My Balloon? written by Ariel Bernstein and illustrated by Scott Magoon, Paula Wiseman Books ©2019.

 

Rather than immediately owning up to what he did, Monkey first brings Owl a pillow and claims it’s the red balloon. The humor is in how long the charade will go on and what wild items Monkey will present to his friend in an effort to placate him. The ultimate goalavoid telling the truth about what happened. As in the previous story, Magoon’s artful expressions conveyed on the faces and in the two characters’ body language adds to the enjoyment. The generous use of white space keeps our eyes glued to the two animals’ antics. We watch closely as Monkey seeks out silly substitutes for the balloon. After a chair, a fire engine and a parachute don’t do the trick, Monkey, wracked with guilt, breaks down and confesses. Then he apologizes.

 

Where is My Balloon int2
Interior spread from Where is My Balloon? written by Ariel Bernstein and illustrated by Scott Magoon, Paula Wiseman Books ©2019.

 

The illustrations of Owl’s reactions to his popped balloon are some of my favorites. As his despairing and frenzied mood heightens, Owl tears up the sock, also accidentally. The scene when the bird realizes what he’s done cracks me up as he subtly tries to kick the ruined sock off the tree top, out of Monkey’s sight. With the shoe now on the other foot (or in this case perhaps sock is more appropriate), Owl attempts the same subterfuge that had been done to him. Only this time the significance of Owl’s sporting a yellow hat with a red star is not lost on Monkey whose resigned response is classic.

 

Where is my Balloon interior3
Interior illustrations from Where is My Balloon? written by Ariel Bernstein and illustrated by Scott Magoon, Paula Wiseman Books ©2019.

 

Where is My Balloon? is a super story to share with children when you’re looking for a tale that tackles the topic of being honest and asking for forgiveness in a light and lively way. Bernstein’s tight turn of phrase and Magoon’s playful art will keep kids engaged with every page turn. While youngsters may be well aware of what’s going on after the pillow is offered, they’ll be delighted to read along or be read to in order to find out how the dilemmas get resolved. Even adult readers will be charmed by this clever circular story making it a fun go-to read for story time or anytime!

  • Reviewed by Ronna Mandel

Read my review for I Have a Balloon here.

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I Have a Balloon Written by Ariel Bernstein

I HAVE A BALLOON
Written by Ariel Bernstein
Illustrated by Scott Magoon
(Paula Wiseman Books; $17.99, Ages 4-8)

 

I Have a Balloon cover illustration

 

It’s a clear and clever case of the balloon is always redder as opposed to the grass is always greener in Ariel Bernstein’s debut picture book, I Have a Balloon featuring illustrations by Scott Magoon. I absolutely adored this story because it not only took me back to my childhood, but reminded me of so many episodes I had to navigate with my children when the dreaded sharing demon reared its ugly head. I appreciated the slow, steady build up of this timeless tale that takes the dislike of sharing to humorous new heights.

Int spread of Owl with red balloon and monkey from I Have a Balloon
Interior spread from I Have a Balloon by Ariel Bernstein w/art by Scott Magoon, Paula Wiseman Books ©2018.

 

Owl’s got a lovely red balloon he’s pretty darned pleased with. Monkey would like it. Owl says no. Persistent in his pursuit, Monkey offers to trade something of his in return. Owl’s not interested. But it would make Monkey SO HAPPY! Forget about it! Forget the teddy bear Monkey’s willing to swap. Or the sunflower. Or for that matter, the robot or the hand drawn picture of ten balloons. No. No. No. Not a ball or a pin. But something about the sock with a star and a perfectly shaped hole seems to suck Owl in. Suddenly the play potential of this single sock is just so appealing that the tides turn. Following creative, circular prose, readers end up at a similar point from where the drama of this delightful book began.

From the playful book jacket flap copy spoiler alert of: This is NOT a book about sharing to Bernstein’s spot on prose pitting Owl and his special, it’s mine and I’m not sharing it red balloon vibe to Monkey’s earnest desire to possess said balloon, I couldn’t read this book fast enough to find out what happens. From Magoon’s subtle yet oh so successful depictions of the the pair’s interaction (check out Owl’s expressive eyes!) to the perfect (and sweet) finish, I Have a Balloon is wonderfully entertaining. In fact I can’t think of a parent, teacher, caregiver or relative who hasn’t encountered this exact situation. Tightly told, tongue-in-cheek, and relatable, I Have a Balloon is guaranteed to garner grins when shared with kids. A truly treat of a read!

Starred Review – Kirkus Reviews, Publishers Weekly

  • Reviewed by Ronna Mandel

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Opposites Attract

Debbie Glade reviews a book about a big mean dog named, Mike and some, fuzzy little irresistible bunnies.

Too bad you can’t see the smile on my face. I just read Big Mean Mike ($15.99, Candlewick Press, Ages 4 and up), and it’s  a really charming book with a terrific message for kids. Big Mean Mike is an intimidating dog with a big, mean car, a scary bark and a macho personality. He likes to rev his car engine and go to monster truck shows where other big, mean dogs go. And he loves the fact that everyone else is terrified of him.

One day Mike discovers a fuzzy white bunny in his car. Naturally he removes the bunny from his car and tells him to get lost. But the next day there are two fuzzy, white bunnies in his car, and each day there are more, until there are four fuzzy, white bunnies in his car. Since he can’t seem to get rid of them, one day Mean Mike decides to hide those bunnies in his bag and sneak them to the monster truck show. He was sure no one would see them. But he was wrong. What do you suppose happened when his mean friends saw him with four fuzzy bunnies?

What I love about Big Mean Mike is that teaches kids the ultimate message that you can still be cool if you are kind. Author Michelle Knudsen did a fantastic job of presenting Mike’s fearless, bully-like character in stark contrast with four darling helpless bunnies. Scott Magoon’s colorful cartoon-like illustrations work beautifully with the story and are a delight to look at. This is a perfect book any young child and for elementary teachers to keep in their classrooms. Big Mean Mike gives us all hope that behind every tough guy is a gentle dude with a big, kind heart.

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