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Kids Picture Book Review – Two Tough Trucks

TWO TOUGH TRUCKS
by Corey Rosen Schwartz + Rebecca J. Gomez
Illustrated by Hilary Leung
(Orchard Books; $17.99, Ages 3-5)

 

Two Tough Trucks Book Cover

 

In Two Tough Trucks by Corey Rosen Schwartz and Rebecca J. Gomez with art by Hilary Leung, Mack and Rig, two vehicles with very different personalities, are heading off for their first day of Truck School. Red Mack is confident and bold. Blue Rig is reluctant and nervous. This sentence describes them to a T: “Two trucks off to school for their first day of class. One riding the brakes. One hitting the gas.”

 

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Interior spread from Two Tough Trucks written by Corey Rosen Schwartz and Rebecca J. Gomez and illustrated by Hilary Leung, Orchard Books/Scholastic ©2019.

 

When the aptly named teacher, Miss Rhodes, pairs the two trucks for a circuit on the track, Mack takes off and doesn’t look back. Rig on the other hand finds the course daunting, facing what seems like one insurmountable challenge after the other. The next drill takes the class to a hill, one which Mack knows he can easily climb. Rig doesn’t feel so sure and comes in “dead last.” The two trucks don’t really connect, each one thinking little of the other. “My partner’s a drag,” is Mack’s take. “That hotshot,” said Rig, “He sure loves to brag.” What will your children think of the characters? It’s a great opportunity to seek their input. The repetition of VROOM! ZOOM! throughout invites sound effects and participation by the littlest readers

 

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Interior spread from Two Tough Trucks written by Corey Rosen Schwartz and Rebecca J. Gomez and illustrated by Hilary Leung, Orchard Books/Scholastic ©2019.

 

It’s not looking hopeful for these two six-wheelers. If there’s a way forward towards friendship, it’s eluding them. But then there’s light on the horizon for Rig when the class is tasked with learning how to go backward while hauling cargo. That’s when Rig excels at last! Hold on! Was that a look of doubt creeping onto blundering Mack’s face? Exasperated, the big, red truck is ready to give up. VROOM! DOOM?

With this shift in ability, Rig’s gained confidence but not a big head. He kindly helps his partner tackle the task until Mack masters it, too. Schwartz and Gomez get youngsters engaged with the colorful characters and the pace of this story. Kids’ll cheer as the vehicles bond after accomplishing what they needed to as a team. It’s wonderful to see how working together with positive attitudes yields mutual success.

 

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Interior spread from Two Tough Trucks written by Corey Rosen Schwartz and Rebecca J. Gomez and illustrated by Hilary Leung, Orchard Books/Scholastic ©2019.

 

Leung’s lively illustrations emphasize the individual vehicles. Rig wears a camouflage design bandana and Mack, a baseball cap to match his trim. I like the movement the illustrations convey and how the southwestern style art palate bleeds off the page. Of note and adorable is how, in the end, after a friendship has developed, the two pals have exchanged head ware. Have your kids also keep an eye out for the cute turtle and roadrunner who appear in multiple spreads.

Two Tough Trucks is clearly more than a first day of school picture book. It’s a super rhyming story about learning to  get along, having each other’s back and being a good sport. The title works too. Each vehicle has its strengths and weaknesses, true. It’s not letting those areas that need improvement immobilize them that makes them tough, especially together as a team. Rev up your engines and make tracks to your nearest bookstore for a copy of Two Tough Trucks today!

  • Reviewed by Ronna Mandel

Here’s a link to a review of another picture book by Corey Rosen Schwartz.
Here’s a link to a review of another picture book by Corey Rosen Schwartz + Rebecca J. Gomez.

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What About Moose? by Corey Rosen Schwartz and Rebecca J. Gomez

WHAT ABOUT MOOSE?
Written by Corey Rosen Schwartz & Rebecca J. Gomez
Illustrated by Keika Yamaguchi
(Atheneum Books for Young Readers; $17.99, Ages 4-8)

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Tonight I attended a book launch by Los Angeles illustrator, Keika Yamaguchi, at the Casa Verdugo branch of the Glendale Public Library. I not only learned about her illustration process to create the artwork for What About Moose?, but I also got to watch the reactions of dozens of children in attendance. By their response, I knew the books would fly off the shelves. 

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Interior Artwork from What About Moose? Written by Corey Rosen Schwartz & Rebecca J. Gomez, Atheneum BYR ©2015.

This recommended-for-read-aloud rhyming picture book introduces youngsters to Moose, Fox, Bear, Skunk, Frog, and Porcupine who intend to build a treehouse together, through teamwork. Moose, however, has other ideas and proclaims himself foreman. As he issues order upon order, Moose’s behavior does not endear him to his friends. In spite of this, there is humor to be found on every page both in the rhymes and illustrations. Kids’ll eat up the fact that Moose has taken to giving his “commands from a big megaphone.” His bossiness will not be lost on children as they sense the tension building between Moose and his pals as every so often one of them asks, “But what about you, Moose?” Soon your child will be asking the very same thing, quite eager to see how Moose will respond. In fact, he’s so busy ordering his friends around that he neglects to notice the treehouse built around him. It’s only once the roof is put on that Moose realizes the door is too tiny for him to fit through!!

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Interior Artwork from What About Moose? Written by Corey Rosen Schwartz & Rebecca J. Gomez, Atheneum BYR ©2015.

Luckily for Moose, his friends are a caring bunch. They hatch a plan to help him get out of the house safely because how long can the animals bear to listen to Moose’s complaints as he “groaned and he grumbled. ‘It’s squishing my butt,'” to which Fox replies, “We’ll help you … if you keep your mouth shut!” That line, incidentally is one of my favorites although far from being the only one!

The constructive ending is more than satisfactory and will give parents an opportunity to talk about the benefits of teamwork. The illustrations are adorable and, though Moose was by far the favorite character judging by hands raised when that question was posed to the attendees, Bear was a close second. I must add that in Yamaguchi’s talk this evening she explained to the audience that she had to do a lot of research on how to build a tree house before she could approach the illustrations. Well, it appears she’s learned how!


– Reviewed by Ronna Mandel

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