skip to Main Content

The 50 States Fun Fact Blog Extravaganza!

The 50 States:
Explore the U.S.A. with 50 fact-filled maps!

Written by Gabrielle Balkan
Illustrated by Sol Linero
(Wide Eyed Editions; $30.00; Ages 7-10)

 

 THE 50 STATES FUN FACT BLOG EXTRAVAGANZA

50-States_CVRUpon reading The 50 States, a lavishly-illustrated collection of fact-filled maps, children will be inspired by the inventiveness, beauty and diversity of the United States. There are thousands of wondrous locations to be explored, hundreds of historical moments to discover, and The 50 States: Explore the U.S.A. with 50 fact-filled maps! also includes information on hundreds of people who helped make America what it is today. In addition, there’s a helpful guide to the state flags and presidents of the USA.

And we’ve got New York!!

WELCOME TO THE EMPIRE STATE New York was America’s capital before it was a nation, and still a British colony. After the Americans won their independence, George Washington—the first president—was sworn in on the steps of New York City’s Federal Hall. With a population of more than 8 million, New York City is the largest city by far in the country. In fact, “the City that Never Sleeps” has more people than 40 of the U.S.’s 50 states! This mighty metropolis is one of the only places where the price of a slice of pizza and the cost of a single ride on the subway have been equal for over 50 years! One visit is all it takes to fall in love with this historic, culture-filled state—from the jaw-dropping awesomeness of Niagara Falls or the rugged beauty of the Adirondacks to the cheesecake, hot dogs, and clam chowder of the Big Apple.

50 States_New York copy

Interior artwork from The 50 States: Explore the U.S.A. with 50 fact-filled maps! by Gabrielle Balkan with illustrations by Sol Linero, Wide Eyed Editions ©2015.

Here are some of my favorite facts about New York:

– DEREK JETER b.1974 Jeter’s 20-year baseball career with the New York Yankees included five World Series championships.

– JIMMY FALLON b.1974 Brooklyn-bred Fallon starred in Saturday Night Live and now hosts The Tonight Show.

– JULY 8, 1779: General George Washington moves his Revolutionary War headquarters to West Point, which later becomes the United States Military Academy.

– JULY 19–20, 1848: Votes for women! The first suffrage convention is held in Seneca Falls.

– MAY 24, 1883: The Brooklyn Bridge opens and 21 elephants cross to test its strength!

– AUGUST 15–18, 1969: 400,000 people come together in the name of peace at the Woodstock festival.

– New York is big on apples: it grows the most of any state after Washington.

– Dress up like comedian Lucille Ball and act out scenes from her hit show at the Desilu Studios in Jamestown.

– STATUE OF LIBERTY – This huge sculpture was completed in 1886. Representing freedom, it has become an icon of New York and the U.S. as a whole.

–  SUBWAY NYC has 722 miles of subway track!

– THE FINGER LAKES are made up of 11 long, thin lakes.

– SYRACUSE experiences the highest average snowfall of any American city.

– IROQUOIS ATHLETICS – An early form of lacrosse was played by the Iroquois nations.

Find out more by picking up a copy at your local independent bookstore today.

Share this:

Lost in NYC: A Subway Adventure by Nadja Spiegelman & Sergio Garcia Sanchez

Lost in NYC: A Subway Adventure
Written by Nadja Spiegelman
Illustrated by Sergio Garcia Sanchez
(Toon Books; $16.95, Ages 8-12)
Also available in Spanish

LostinNYCcvr.jpg

 

A Junior Library Guild Selection
Starred Reviews – Kirkus Reviews, School Library Journal & Booklist

Ever gotten lost on a subway? In New York? I have and I’m from New York! But once you’ve navigated your way around and feel you’ve got the hang of the subway, it’s like you’re on top of the world, not 35 feet underground (like at the 42nd St. Station). You might never take the bus again.

intimageLostinNYC.jpgI’ll start this review by pointing out that a purchase of Lost in NYC: A Subway Adventure, is like getting multiple books in one! First there’s the graphic novel adventure featuring Pablo, a boy new to both his school and to the city. Alicia, a classmate, volunteers to partner with him on a field trip to the Empire State Building using public transportation. At the uptown Manhattan subway station (96th St.), the pair get separated from their class and have to find their way alone. Eventually even Alicia and Pablo get separated which may seem frightening, but it’s never presented that way. In fact, it’s empowering for kids to see their peers commuting this way successfully. Demonstrating common sense, the two make tracks individually to the Empire State Building, one on foot, the other using a cross town train. Ultimately, across a crowded lobby, Pablo and Alicia are reunited in time to join the tour, running towards each other like in a scene from a film. They’re clearly overjoyed, but Mr. Bartles, their teacher, is not as impressed.

intspreadLostinNYC.jpg

Interior image from Lost in NYC: A Subway Adventure by Nadja Spiegelman with illustrations by Sergio Garcia Sanchez, Toon Books ©2015.

In addition to the adventure, there’s the budding friendship story. As the bungled journey evolves, Pablo eventually comes to appreciate Alicia’s gesture of kindness to buddy up on the field trip which he so vehemently rejected at the beginning of the book.

“I was only trying help.” – Alicia
“Help?” – Pablo
“What makes you think I need help! I don’t need anything.” – Pablo
“I thought maybe you wanted a friend…” – Alicia

It’s through this friendship that Pablo is able to  look at New York with new eyes and begin to feel at home.

731540

Interior image from Lost in NYC: A Subway Adventure by Nadja Spiegelman with illustrations by Sergio Garcia Sanchez, Toon Books ©2015.

Another draw is the NYC subway system, like an extra character, with its express and local lines, the colorful maps, and the various stops or stations in the city. I was delighted to see my old subway stop in Queens even made it into the book! Fans of transportation trivia will enjoy the enlightening repartee between Mr. Bartle and his students as he educates them on their subway knowledge. I lived in New York for 30 years and had no idea why the Y and U letters were never used. After reading the fact-filled end pages I learned it’s because the MTA (Metropolitan Transportation Authority) worried the public would be confused thinking they sounded too much like “why” and “you.”

Last but not least is the inclusion of archival photographs from old New York taking readers back in time to the 1800s and into the 20th century for a glimpse of what early subway stations and construction on them looked like. There are also more details about the Empire State Building and a Further Reading & Resources for those who, like me, cannot resist finding out more about the Big Apple’s history. Author Spiegelman has packed a plethora of interesting information into this engaging and extremely original book. I had no idea that the Empire State Building, where my uncle once worked, has its own zip code (10118) and had its grand opening on May 1, 1931, 84 years ago today! Lost in NYC closes with Tips for Parents, Teachers, and Librarians to make young readers’ experience of diving into a TOON graphic novel more pleasurable.

I have to give a shout out to the amazingly detailed illustrations by Garcia Sanchez. My favorite is the angled perspective of the Empire State Building as the school children zoom up to the observation deck in one of seventy-three elevators. Early on I noticed a man taking photos in almost every scene, but I didn’t notice the policeman watching him. Sanchez, while on a reconnaissance mission for the book, must have aroused suspicion. In a humorous touch, the artist has cleverly inserted himself and the cop who followed him into the story so be on the lookout!  Between the diverse cast of characters, the compelling storyline and the excellent artwork, I have to say I am very happy to have found Lost in NYC: A Subway Adventure. 

Click here to download a guide for teachers.

– Reviewed by Ronna Mandel

Share this:

Little Humans by Brandon Stanton

Celebrating Children
Little Humans by Brandon Stanton

 

✩Starred Review – Publishers Weekly
Los Angeles Times Holiday Books Guide
Amazon.com Best Books of the Year

Little-Humans-cvr.jpgI am utterly charmed by Brandon Stanton’s new nonfiction picture book, Little Humans (Farrar, Straus and Giroux Books for Young Readers, $17.99, Ages 2-6) and am singing its praises to all who’ll listen. Most of you know Stanton from his blog, and #1 New York Times Bestseller, Humans of New York. In this adorable picture book he’s collected a wonderful, diverse array of photographs of the children of New York. The accompanying text is affirming to all “little humans” everywhere that they are capable of doing big things! Of course they may need to ask for help, they may just need a hug or two, but by and large they can accomplish many things on their own. For example, as the book states they can, “Put on a show, to make you proud of what they know!” I’m a big fan of books that affirm that children should be credited for knowing as much as they do. They know a lot!

Little humans int_REVFINAL hires 6

Interior images from Little Humans by Brandon Stanton, Farrar, Straus and Giroux ©2014.

The photographs of the children take up nearly each entire page. Many of them are taken on the eye level of the child or children in the photograph. This means there was some considerable time that Brandon Stanton had to spend on his knees or, as the dust jacket on the inside flap shows, actually on the ground to get such great shots! These large as life photos help to remind the reader that these little humans may be small, but they are so much more than that. They’re full of life, and are being met by Stanton literally on their own level on every page. In these photos Stanton helps to bridge the gap of space that exists between children and adults.

Little humans int_REVFINAL hires 19

Interior images from Little Humans by Brandon Stanton, Farrar, Straus and Giroux ©2014.

So many colorful personalities present themselves, and each child has his or her own unique style of awesome! The smile inducing photos range from one child in particular being singled out, to groups of many children. The photos of children of different ethnic and religious backgrounds are especially important for me to see, as I continue to try to support diverse children’s books. I very much appreciate the diversity of personality type, too. However, it’s the sweet face of every child featured in this book that pleases me most. Every child is warmly celebrated. Little Humans is a perfect book for a holiday gift for a little human you might know, and would definitely be a great present for a teacher. Well done, Brandon Stanton! Once again, you show us the beauty of all humanity.

– Reviewed by Hilary Taber

Share this:
Back To Top
%d bloggers like this: