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Eat Your U.S. History Homework by Ann McCallum

EAT YOUR U.S. HISTORY HOMEWORK:
RECIPES FOR REVOLUTIONARY MINDS
Written by Ann McCallum
Illustrated by Leeza Hernandez
(Charlesbridge; $15.95, Ages 7-10)

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The author-illustrator team who brought us Eat Your Math Homework and Eat Your Science Homework has collaborated on another “tasty” title which explores our country’s roots. Part cookbook, part engaging informational book, Eat Your U.S. History Homework helps children understand U.S. history by providing “… edible connections to American History …” (p. 4).

A timeline of events in U.S. history from 1620-1789 helps children visualize the major events that occurred during this span of history along with a few fun facts such as Washington’s purchase of a cream machine for ice in 1784.

Following the introduction there’s the ever helpful and important “Kitchen Tips” section which emphasizes a few basic and common sense techniques: get an adult to assist you, read the directions carefully, and … wash your hands!

Now for the recipes!

The six recipes found here are “… based on original descriptions or what historians believe …” (p. 4) were used by early Americans. The recipes have thankfully been “modernized” for twenty-first century tastes: can you imagine using bear grease instead of butter?

I was intrigued by the “Lost Bread” recipe and so turned to p. 23 and read that during the French and Indian Wars, the British and American soldiers ate hardtack, similar to a cracker, but so hard that chewing it could actually result in chipped teeth! The French, however, made great use of their stale bread (pain perdu or “lost” bread) by dipping it into an egg batter and pan frying it. Sound familiar? We call it French toast. Sounds like they ate better and kept their teeth intact. Other recipes include Revolutionary Honey-Jumble Cookies and Colonial Cherry-Berry Grunt.

While the author does not provide a list of sources, she does include very helpful tools in promoting understanding of this period of U.S. history. Each recipe is preceded by an historical note on how that dish ties into America’s early history. The “Glossary” and the “Review of History” both contain brief descriptions of major events, people, places, etc. A scroll-like sidebar, entitled “Side Dish,” gets children to use their critical thinking skills by answering a question that ties into the recipe’s time period. The “Side Dish” for “Lost Bread” discusses how the name changes of contemporary Pittsburgh (a French and Indian War site) reflect the many cultures who lived or controlled that area: Shannopin (Native American), Fort Prince George (British), Fort Duquesne (French), Fort Pitt (British, then American). Students are encouraged to find out the origins of their own home town’s name.

Hernandez’s colorfully dressed young rabbits cheerfully capture McCallum’s accessible and humorous text as they prepare and consume the recipes or present information. Eat Your U.S. History Homework is a savory selection for children ages 7-10.

Click here for a downloadable teacher’s guide. And check out the fun www.eatyourmathhomework.com website for more Eat Your Homework Books activities.

  • Reviewed by Dornel Cerro

 

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The 50 States Fun Fact Blog Extravaganza!

The 50 States:
Explore the U.S.A. with 50 fact-filled maps!

Written by Gabrielle Balkan
Illustrated by Sol Linero
(Wide Eyed Editions; $30.00; Ages 7-10)

 

 THE 50 STATES FUN FACT BLOG EXTRAVAGANZA

50-States_CVRUpon reading The 50 States, a lavishly-illustrated collection of fact-filled maps, children will be inspired by the inventiveness, beauty and diversity of the United States. There are thousands of wondrous locations to be explored, hundreds of historical moments to discover, and The 50 States: Explore the U.S.A. with 50 fact-filled maps! also includes information on hundreds of people who helped make America what it is today. In addition, there’s a helpful guide to the state flags and presidents of the USA.

And we’ve got New York!!

WELCOME TO THE EMPIRE STATE New York was America’s capital before it was a nation, and still a British colony. After the Americans won their independence, George Washington—the first president—was sworn in on the steps of New York City’s Federal Hall. With a population of more than 8 million, New York City is the largest city by far in the country. In fact, “the City that Never Sleeps” has more people than 40 of the U.S.’s 50 states! This mighty metropolis is one of the only places where the price of a slice of pizza and the cost of a single ride on the subway have been equal for over 50 years! One visit is all it takes to fall in love with this historic, culture-filled state—from the jaw-dropping awesomeness of Niagara Falls or the rugged beauty of the Adirondacks to the cheesecake, hot dogs, and clam chowder of the Big Apple.

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Interior artwork from The 50 States: Explore the U.S.A. with 50 fact-filled maps! by Gabrielle Balkan with illustrations by Sol Linero, Wide Eyed Editions ©2015.

Here are some of my favorite facts about New York:

– DEREK JETER b.1974 Jeter’s 20-year baseball career with the New York Yankees included five World Series championships.

– JIMMY FALLON b.1974 Brooklyn-bred Fallon starred in Saturday Night Live and now hosts The Tonight Show.

– JULY 8, 1779: General George Washington moves his Revolutionary War headquarters to West Point, which later becomes the United States Military Academy.

– JULY 19–20, 1848: Votes for women! The first suffrage convention is held in Seneca Falls.

– MAY 24, 1883: The Brooklyn Bridge opens and 21 elephants cross to test its strength!

– AUGUST 15–18, 1969: 400,000 people come together in the name of peace at the Woodstock festival.

– New York is big on apples: it grows the most of any state after Washington.

– Dress up like comedian Lucille Ball and act out scenes from her hit show at the Desilu Studios in Jamestown.

– STATUE OF LIBERTY – This huge sculpture was completed in 1886. Representing freedom, it has become an icon of New York and the U.S. as a whole.

–  SUBWAY NYC has 722 miles of subway track!

– THE FINGER LAKES are made up of 11 long, thin lakes.

– SYRACUSE experiences the highest average snowfall of any American city.

– IROQUOIS ATHLETICS – An early form of lacrosse was played by the Iroquois nations.

Find out more by picking up a copy at your local independent bookstore today.

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