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Picture Book Review – Gitty and Kvetch

GITTY AND KVETCH

Written by Caroline Kusin Pritchard

Illustrated by Ariel Landy

(Atheneum BYR; $17.99, Ages 4-8)

 

 

Gitty and Kvetch cover

 

 

Take one glass-half-full girl named Gitty and add one glass-half-empty bird named Kvetch and you’ve got the makings of one unusual and entertaining pair of pals in the new picture book, Gitty and Kvetch. Although he kvetches (complains) a lot, Kvetch is more realist than pessimist which is a quality I love and appreciate.

The story opens with Gitty painting a picture and seeking out her “unflappable friend” so he can accompany her on the “perfect day to hang the perfect painting in our perfect, purple tree house.”

 

Interior illus by Ariel Landy from GITTY AND KVETCH by Caroline Kusin Pritchard 2
Interior art from Gitty and Kvetch written by Caroline Kusin Pritchard and illustrated by Ariel Landry, Atheneum BYR ©2021.

 

A great touch is how Gitty’s dialogue is colored purple throughout the book while Kevtch’s is appropriate in blue. Yiddish words are successfully infused into the story as the friends shlep off together. No matter what Gitty sees, including cow poop, her upbeat mood cannot be brought down by Kvetch’s seemingly gloom and doom.

 

 

Interior illus by Ariel Landy from GITTY AND KVETCH by Caroline Kusin Pritchard 4
Interior spread from Gitty and Kvetch written by Caroline Kusin Pritchard and illustrated by Ariel Landry, Atheneum BYR ©2021.

 

 

Even when a storm approaches, Gitty sees “the perfect cloud covering the perfect sun on the perfect day to hang the perfect painting.” Her enthusiasm for all she encounters is infectious and a stark contrast to her friend Kvetch. That is until the delightful drizzle becomes a heavy rain. When Gitty sees her perfect painting has been ruined by the rain, she is distraught. Here the roles of the BFFs suddenly shift and it’s time for Kvetch to rise to the occasion to cheer up Gitty. That’s when an idea he has convinces his friend, in the most perfect colorful way, what perfect is really all about.

Kvetch’s Glossary of Yiddish words on the endpapers is a wonderful way for him to explain all the words used in the story. I found more and more to enjoy in this story with every read. Landy’s cheerful and energetic illustrations kept my interest, inviting me back for more. Pritchard’s prose, especially the repetition, flowed easily over the fast-reading 48 pages with lovely alliteration. The story should resonate with young readers who have likely found themselves in a similar predicament at one time or another. The dynamic of Gitty and Kvetch provides the opportunity for kids to see the power of friendship and empathy at play.

  •  Reviewed by Ronna Mandel
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