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Chapter Book Review – Detective Gordon: A Case with a Bang

 

DETECTIVE GORDON:
A Case with a Bang

Written by Ulf Nilsson

Illustrated by Gitte Spee

Translated by Julia Marshall

(Gecko Press; $18.99, Ages 5-11)

 

 

Detective_Gordon_A_Case_with_a_bang_cover_toad_mouse_squirrel_troll Detective Gordon A Case with a bang cover toad mouse squirrel troll

 

 

Originally written in Swedish, A Case with a Bang is the final installment in late author Ulf Nilsson’s Detective Gordon series. The story centers on the mouse and toad duo of Chief Detective Buffy and retired police Chief Detective Gordon. This time around they are joined by their young squirrel friend Helmer who wishes to learn all there is about being a police officer. And they certainly do have a case to solve as someone has been making noise with Badger’s trash can in the middle of the night and this must be investigated.

 

A Case with a Bang int1 Chap5 Buffy Becomes Flat
Interior illustration from Detective Gordon: A Case with a Bang written by Ulf Nilsson and illustrated by Gitte Spee, Gecko Press ©2023.

 

Illustrator Gitte Spee has captured the gentleness of the story with colorful drawings that young readers will enjoy. A two-page spread of a map of Chief Detective Buffy’s police district shows all the landmarks that are important to the plot: Badger’s cottage (the scene of the original offense), the police station (where Buffy and Gordon live), the bakery, the kindergarten, the cave and so forth. That it is young Helmer who plays an integral part in solving the case in the end, will resonate with the intended audience, who will see themselves portrayed in the success of their contemporary whereas the adults in the story initially failed.

Divided into twelve chapters, translator Julia Marshall does a fine job of making it accessible to the American market, while still retaining the original flavor of its European roots.

 

A Case with a Bang int2 Map of Chief Detective Buffy's Police District
Interior illustration from Detective Gordon: A Case with a Bang written by Ulf Nilsson and illustrated by Gitte Spee, Gecko Press ©2023.

 

More than just a mystery, this book contains simple nuggets of wisdom and life lessons interspersed throughout. These gems are not alluded to; they are stated outright in bolded, centered text as every case that has been solved has important notes written about them, before being stamped and tucked away in a drawer for future reference. Some of this reviewer’s favorites are: If it doesn’t work one way, it will work another; Always ask someone who knows; Everyone thinks differently: listen carefully to all; and the final one of the book, which is, appropriately: There is always a good ending. In every story. And in real life. If one is open to everything.

This intelligent book is equally recommended for the advanced younger reader to read independently or for adults to read aloud to young charges who appreciate a story told with both subtle humor and depth.

  • Reviewed by Freidele Galya Soban Biniashvili

 

 

Here’s a sneak peek video:

 

 

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Children’s Picture Book Review – The Winter Bird

 

THE WINTER BIRD

Written by Kate Banks

Illustrated by Suzie Mason

(Candlewick Press; $18.99, Ages 3-7)

 

 

The Winter Bird cover

 

 

Written by Kate Banks and illustrated by Suzie Mason, The Winter Bird is a comforting and heartwarming story of friendship and perseverance, helping readers discover the quiet strength of patience and hope. 

During the time of year “when the sun [goes] to bed early,” brown bear and hedgehog prepare for their annual winter routines. Nestled in a thicket and nursing a broken wing, the nightingale watches the geese, starlings, and swallows fly away. “‘What will happen to me?’” the nightingale asks. As a spring bird, it “‘knows nothing of winter.’” 

 

The Winter Bird int1 injured nightingale watches geese fly
THE WINTER BIRD. Text Copyright © 2022 Kate Banks. Illustrations Copyright © 2022 by Suzie Mason. Reproduced by permission of the publisher, Candlewick Press, Somerville, MA.

 

“‘You will learn … You will learn,’” hoots the owl who, along with other friendly animals like the rabbit and gray squirrel, provide food and shelter, helping the nightingale survive its new icy surroundings. 

Adapting to the slow, winter rhythm of nesting, waiting, and wondering, the nightingale learns the beauty in both the harshness and brilliance of the season. In lovely, lyrical language, we watch the landscape change as “the cold cre[eps] in on icy feet” and “the waltz of winter” begins. Beautiful illustrations in soft browns and grays, rounded edges, and spots of bright color let readers know:  though the storm is coming, all will be well.

 

 

The Winter Bird int2 forest animals in snow
THE WINTER BIRD. Text Copyright © 2022 Kate Banks. Illustrations Copyright © 2022 by Suzie Mason. Reproduced by permission of the publisher, Candlewick Press, Somerville, MA.

 

Throughout it all, the nightingale does what it knows how to do–sing. Whether singing of “winter’s woes” or “winter’s wonders,” it brings comfort to both itself and the other animals around it. A spring bird, the nightingale patiently learns how to “become a winter bird, too.” 

A soothing picture book for bedtime or quiet time, The Winter Bird invites readers to bundle up, settle in, and enjoy the wonder of winter.  

  • Reviewed by Armineh Manookian

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Christmas Books for Children Part 2

CHILDREN’S CHRISTMAS BOOKS 2020

A ROUNDUP PART 2

 

 

Free Clipart ivy ornament

 

 

 

 

TheTwelveBirdiesofChristmas cvrTHE TWELVE BIRDIES OF CHRISTMAS
Written and illustrated by Jennifer Sattler
(Sleeping Bear Press; $8.99, Ages Birth and up)

If you’re looking for a board book that’s full of feathered fun this holiday season, look no further than 24 pages of The Twelve Birdies of Christmas. Little ones will want to see the pictures again and again as a bunch of birdies recreate their own version of the beloved Christmas carol while getting up to all sorts of silliness across the pages. The 3 French hens illustration is my favorite and I also laughed at the 7 swans-a-swimming, but I’m sure your children will choose their own while singing along to Sattler’s new lyrics. If you want some context, the original version is included in the back of the book.

 

DINOSAUR CHRISTMAS
Written and illustrated by Penny Dale
(Nosy Crow; $16.99, Ages 2-5)

Calling all dino and transportation fans. The winning combination of dinosaurs and heavy-duty utility vehicles featured in Dinosaur Christmas will entertain the youngest revelers in your household. The premise is a simple one that will be satisfying to children. Santa’s stuck in the Northpole on Christmas Eve and only his dino pals have the brawn required to set his sleigh free. But the best part is the variety of transportation modes they use to get through the stormy weather to mount their rescue. There’s lots of repetition and onomatopoeia to add to the read-aloud experience of this sweetly illustrated picture book. “Team Dinosaur arriving. Arriving and starting to dig. Starting to dig out Santa’s sleigh. Scoop! Scoop! Scoop!” My son and daughter used to memorize books like this when they were little and no doubt your children will too. Kids can search the art for hidden polar bears and study both the front and back endpapers for pictures and names of all the dinosaurs and vehicles included in the story. 

 

LatkesforSantaClaus coverLATKES FOR SANTA CLAUS
Written by Janie Emaus
Illustrated by Bryan Langdo
(Sky Pony Press; $16.99, Ages 3-6)

Ideal for blended families, but definitely delightful for anyone to read, Laktes for Santa Claus is a clever Hanukkah meets Christmas spin on leaving cookies out for Santa on Christmas Eve. Even if it’s not Chrismukkah (when Christmas and Hanukkah overlap), this picture book still shows a way for Jewish children living with a non-Jewish step-sibling and/or step-parent how fun it is to share a bit of their Jewish holiday traditions during Christmastime. Emaus introduces readers to Anna, who is Jewish, as she emails Santa who she guesses must be tired of the same old cookies every year. She promises to leave him a special treat and then sets about to make that happen. Anna just has to figure out what Jewish food will work. Her step-brother Michael, intent on baking cookies, points out how most of Anna’s ideas will require a utensil which Santa will not have after coming down a chimney, hands full of presents. What can she offer that won’t make a massive mess? When she realizes that latkes can be noshed as finger-food, she’s excited to put them out along with Michael’s cookies. When the siblings discover all the food gone on Christmas morning, Michael is eager to work together with Anna to plan something unique for the next Christmas. The back matter includes recipes for both the latkes and the cookies so kids can try their hand at baking with an adult. I love how the cover features a menorah on the mantle as well as a Christmas tree welcoming readers of all faiths to dive into this fun story. There is some rhyme and onomatopoeia for reading aloud enjoyment and at 40 pages, the story flows quickly complemented by the colorful, comic-style art. Despite the title giveaway, young readers will want to see the process as Anna narrows down her choices for Santa. I enjoyed every page of this charming new picture book because it showed how there is not only room for compromise in every family, but how easily a new tradition can be created bringing everyone closer.

 

LittleMolesChristmasGift cvrLITTLE MOLE’S CHRISTMAS GIFT
Written by Glenys Nellist
Illustrated by Sally Garland
(Beaming Books; $17.99, Ages 4-8)

This story brought to mind the classic, Big Bird Brings Spring to Sesame Street. That story, about Big Bird buying a bouquet of flowers but ultimately giving them all away to his pals on his way home, is about the joy of sharing. The beauty in Nellist’s Little Mole’s Christmas Gift is the selfless generosity of the main character which exemplifies the true spirit of the holiday. Little Mole finds the perfect, “biggest, most beautiful” mushroom to bring home for his mother’s Christmas gift but along the way encounters forest friends in need of food, a pillow, an umbrella for protection. Mole knows his mushroom can make a difference, so rather than ignoring the cries for help, he offers part of the gift to each animal. He presents what remains of the mushroom to his grateful mother. Mama Mole understands and appreciates the kind-hearted gesture her child has made and that is indeed the greatest gift a mother could ask for. Garland’s charming illustrations bring a warmth and richness of color to the winter setting and will make kids want to read her other book in the series. A free Little Mole activity pack is available for download on the website too.

Santa.com coverSANTA.COM
Written by Russell Hicks & Matt Cubberly
Illustrated by Ryley Garcia
(Familius; $17.99, Ages 4-8)

Santa.com is a picture book that feels like an episode from children’s television and is certain to engage youngsters who might ordinarily prefer TV over books. Authors Hicks and Cubberly have come up with a neat storyline for a 21st century Christmas. At Santa.com gifts get handled robotically and are “delivered by peppermint drones.” Things run smoothly until the system gets hacked by a cyber Scrooge. Luckily Yo-Yo the elf knows from his Grandpa’s stories that Santa still exists and, with the help of his elf pals, might be coaxed out of retirement to solve the problem. I found the ending really the only slightly ambivalent part and leave it up to readers to come to their own conclusion about how Christmas got saved. I enjoyed the energy and movement Garcia’s art conveyed and the adorable characters he’s imagined. For tech-loving kids, this modern take on Christmas is an original read for the holidays.

  •  Reviewed by Ronna Mandel

Read Christine Van Zandt’s roundup of seven new Christmas books she loves by clicking here.

 

 

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