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Family Cookbooks – A Roundup

 

 

 

COOKBOOKS FOR ALL!

A Roundup of Recommended Reads

 

 

 

 

Bake Make Learn to Cook coverBAKE, MAKE & LEARN TO COOK: Fun & Healthy Recipes for Young Cooks
Written by David Atherton

Illustrated by Rachel Stubbs
(Candlewick Press; $17.99, Ages 5-9)

Bake, Make & Learn to Cook: Fun & Healthy Recipes for Young Cooks by David Atherton is an enjoyable but thorough first cookbook for elementary-schoolers. The wide range of appealing recipes is explained in easy-to-follow boxes of information. Recipes include kid-friendly foods such as pancakes, pizzas, and cake. I like how some weave in animal elements. For example, Banana Bear Pancakes, Octo-Pizzas, and Hummus Lion. It doesn’t take much extra work to elevate a seemingly standard recipe to something exciting.

Kids will enjoy exploring recipes such as Edible Chia Bowls, Happy Curry, and Zingy Cake Squares (lemon adds the “zing”). I appreciate new-to-me ideas such as making your own hot dogs (Veggie Hot Dogs) and the clever concept of serving soup from a teapot (Teapot Soup). Other personal favorites include Sweet and Spicy Dip (with sweet potato, garlic, tahini, lime, and spices) and the adorably tasty Crunchy Hedgehogs (a variation of twice-cooked potatoes with tuna, cheese, and peas coated with bread crumbs).

Care is taken throughout to convey information in a way that’s simple to grasp. The upbeat art by Rachel Stubbs helps further explain the directions and provides a pleasant, visual element. I would recommend this cookbook without hesitation for young cooks and their adult helpers

 

The Complete Cookbook for Young Scientists THE COMPLETE COOKBOOK FOR YOUNG SCIENTISTS:
70+ Recipes and Experiments for Every Young Chef (Young Chefs Series)
by America’s Test Kitchen

(America’s Test Kitchen Kids; $19.99, Ages  8+)

For science-minded kids or anyone looking to better understand the whys of cooking and baking, The Complete Cookbook for Young Scientists has the answers! It’s beautifully laid out with full-color photos throughout and fun experiments leading into recipes that put the science into delicious use. When I saw the cover (which features an unreal-looking cake with a gelatinous black, purple, and teal icing), I knew I had to get this book and learn how to make that recipe—it’s a showstopper.

Adults will enjoy this book much as kids because there’s much to learn. I’ve made berry muffins for years and didn’t realize that the addition of yogurt creates a lighter, fluffier texture, or that adding baking soda when caramelizing onions enhances the sweetness. The Edible Spheres recipe blew my mind: using gelatin plus a flavoring (even hot sauce works!) makes tiny boba-size spheres form because of the reaction between oil and water.

If you’re looking to perfect a cookie or cake recipe, this book’s tips will surely get you there. I like the experiment where you make two batches of cookies, one using white sugar and the other using brown sugar. The results clearly show how swapping out just one ingredient makes a big difference in taste, texture, and thickness.

Questions that kids would ask start out the chapters. Some examples include: Can you tell the difference between crispy and crunchy? Why do spices have so much flavor? Why do the different parts of the chicken taste and look different? Answers are provided in a way that’s easy to understand and thorough, involving hands-on experiments where kids test their theories.

This book is the fourth in the Complete Cookbook for Young Chefs series and it does not disappoint. While marketed for a middle-grade audience, the content is also relevant for elementary-schoolers who love to be in the kitchen (or the lab!) and has enough fascinating information to hold the attention of teens and adults. My copy has been well-used in the short time I’ve had it. I’m on board for America’s Test Kitchen’s upcoming Teen Chefs book (March 2022) because this series is terrific.

 

Let's Make Dumplings coverLET’S MAKE DUMPLINGS! A Comic Book Cookbook
Written by Hugh Amano

Illustrated by Sarah Becan
(Ten Speed Press; $19.99)

Let’s Make  Dumplings! is the latest comic-style cookbook from the successful duo, Hugh Amano and Sarah Becan. If you enjoyed their ramen book, this one is just as great. What sets these books apart is that they read like a graphic novel. Full-color panels that convey each recipe’s directions in a new and creative manner, making the content accessible to a wide range of readers. Varying skill levels are accommodated and the cookbook can be enjoyed by readers of all ages.

Who doesn’t love Asian dumplings?! Gyoza, potstickers, wontons, rangoon—yum! With so many shapes and fillings, the options are endless once you master the basics. After a bit of “dumpling lore,” the book begins logically with pantry, equipment, and an explanation of the different wrappers. I was excited to see a recipe for the dough since kids may just think wrappers come from the store!

Learn to make a variety of fillings (meat, vegetarian, even dessert styles) and different methods of sealing the delicious ingredients inside the wrapper. Finish by pan-frying, steaming, or even deep-drying such as for sesame balls). A new-to-me recipe that I particularly enjoyed was the Num Kom (Sweet Cambodian Rice Dumplings) which are filled with coconut and sesame seeds, then steamed in a banana leaf-lined basket.

And don’t forget about the ever-popular baozi. A comprehensive chapter explains how to make these delightful buns. Begin with the well-known steamed pork buns but be sure to move on to also try ones filled with curried beef, kung pao chicken, different kinds of pork, or savory mushrooms.

The final chapter brings it home with a wide range of fabulous sauces that complete the dumpling experience. Some are simply two ingredients: Kewpie mayonnaise and chile sauce. Others play off the sweet-and-sour elements such as the duck sauce made with apricot jam, rice vinegar, soy sauce, garlic, ginger, and cayenne. I can think of lots of foods I’d like to dip in that!

While this book focuses on Eastern dumplings, I like how the fact that food unites us is stated. A map shows where the recipes come from but the accompanying blurb explains how dumplings span the entire globe. Dumplings “transcend any imagined borders of culture and caste” and “unite us all.” Readers are encouraged to do their own research, travel, and make the recipes their own.

 

Sourdough Baking with Kids cover

SOURDOUGH BAKING WITH KIDS:
The Science Behind Baking Bread Loaves with Your Entire Family
Written by Natalya Syanova

Photography by Haas and Haas Photography
(Fair Winds Press/Quarto; $24.99, All Ages)

Natalya Syanova’s Sourdough Baking with Kids gives everyone the ability to make this beloved bread. Start at the beginning and carefully read the instructions. Time is needed—ten days or so—to create a viable starter that will then enable you to try many recipes beyond the basic loaf. The photographs by Haas and Haas Photography showcase the many delicious recipes.

Kids will marvel at how simple it all is. The starter consists of only filtered water and flour. Amazingly, it comes to life and maybe bubbles over the side of the jar in response to being fed, or becomes weak when it’s past time to feed it. Facts add to the wonder. For example, the oldest sourdough starter on record was 122 years old; starter can be lovingly passed from generation to generation.

The first recipe is basic (and very delicious) sourdough bread. A beautiful version uses purple corn flour, which gives the loaf a lovely hue. If you’ve got a sweet tooth, the Double Chocolate Sourdough Loaf may become a favorite in your household; or perhaps it will be the Sweet S’mores Sourdough Loaf. In chocolate chip cookies, sourdough makes the cookies tender and soft. The starter can also be used in brownies, babka, doughnuts, and more.

If you prefer savory dough, check out the pizza, English muffins, pretzels, bagels, and biscuits. If that’s not enough, there are also recipes for cheddar scones, tortillas, and naan. Once you get going, there really are no limits as to what you can make using your starter.

Each recipe has an enticing, full-color photo. In addition to the ingredients and directions, you’re given helpful notes and a sample schedule so you can plan out the time needed. I like the “fun part” sections because they speak directly to the young bakers. Even if they may not be able to follow a recipe (yet!), they certainly can mix and knead dough, divide dough, press it down, and roll it out.

For more independent baking, this book is best suited for tweens, teens, or adults who possess patience and the ability to follow recipes involving precise measurements and timetables. The investment of time and effort is worthwhile; helping something grow from almost nothing is remarkable. This book bestows a solid foundation to launch readers on their journeys of baking with sourdough.

 

Easy Vegan Home Cooking coverEASY VEGAN HOME COOKING
Written by Laura Theodore

(Hatherleigh Press; $25)

Popular host of TV’s Jazzy Vegetarian, Laura Theodore, shares delicious recipes and thoughtful advice in Easy Vegan Home Cooking: Over 125 Plant-Based and Gluten-Free Recipes for Wholesome Family Meals. In addition to recipes, you’ll find helpful tips. For example, oat flour can be quickly made from rolled oats creating fresh flour. (Use it in breads, cookies, or other baked goods.) Or, soaked, drained, and blended raw cashews add a clever creaminess.

My favorite recipes included Pecan-Crusted Zucchini Filets. Squash is a go-to in our house; this version adds loads of flavor from the quick dip in mustard and maple syrup and the yummy nut and cornflake coating. Though we love broccoli and tofu, they feel boring at times—but not with this smoky sauce that accompanies Broccoli-Tofu Szechuan Sauté. For dessert, Petite Apple Ramekins with Coconut-Oat Crunch provide a new twist using items I often have on hand. Your family will feel special digging into their individual servings that smell and taste divine.

Beyond useful advice and wonderful recipes (many with accompanying full-color photos), I appreciate Theodore’s heartfelt sentiments about how she chooses a plant-based way of eating because of her compassion for animals, desire for better health, and aim to become more environmentally responsible. She believes that “we can all help save the world—one recipe at a time!”

 

 

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Three Family-Friendly Cookbooks for National Baking Month

A ROUNDUP

OF FAMILY-FRIENDLY COOKBOOKS

FOR NATIONAL BAKING MONTH

Baking Free Clipart

 

 

Forget the sourdough bread for now. This scrumptious roundup of family-friendly cookbooks for National Baking Month is meant to tempt you and your children to get cooking together! Start with recipes from Chef Junior, move onto Clean Treats for Everyone and then delight in the deliciousness of Now for Something Sweet.

 

ChefJunior coverCHEF JUNIOR:
100 Super Delicious Recipes by Kids for Kids!
*Anthony Spears, Abigail Langford, Paul Kimball, Katie Dessinger, Will Bartlet
(Sterling Epicure; $19.95, Ages 9-12)   

Five young authors prove that kid’s food doesn’t have to be bland and boring in Chef Junior: 100 Super Delicious Recipes by Kids for Kids! And they cover it all: breakfast, lunch, dinner, snacks, desserts, and drinks. The creators range in age from twelve to fifteen, however, the cookbook is suitable for middle graders on up—adults, you will learn from this too! The authors’ definition of “real food” is awesome: “An easy rule of thumb is that if something doesn’t have ingredients, but IS an ingredient (one thing), it is generally healthy for you.”

After some “how-to” instruction, tasty recipes follow, thoughtfully flagged with skill level (easy, moderate, advanced). Because chocolate happens in our household, Mug Brownies were our eleven-year-old daughter’s first choice. Dark chocolate, cashew butter, honey, apricot preserves (or more honey), unsweetened cocoa powder, eggs, vanilla, salt, and baking soda come together, producing yummy brownies baked in six oven-safe coffee mugs. Thoughtful ingredients such as the preserves and cashew butter elevate this brownie to something special.

The second recipe tried was Strawberry Cheesecake. Both the crust and filling have only four ingredients each, making this recipe a snap. It received another thumbs-up from the family.

Savory recipes we want to try include Oven Pancake (one-container cooking = less dishes!), Egg-Drop Soup (why have we never made this?), Super-Quick Gravy (because my gravy skills are lacking), and gluten-free Blender Bread. There are also plenty of recipes that use meat, so browse and let your young chef spoil you with a delicious dish.

*The authors are between the age of 12 and 15 and hail from various states in the US (California, Florida, and Michigan), as well as Canada.

 

Clean Treats coverCLEAN TREATS FOR EVERYONE:
Healthy Desserts and Snacks Made with Simple, Real Food Ingredients
by Laura Fuentes
(Quarto/Fair Winds Press; $ 24.99) 

Laura Fuentes’s delicious cookbook, Clean Treats for Everyone, gives parents a way to provide healthy snacks for kids using real-food ingredients. Known for her successful MOMables.com and her Family Kickstart Program, Fuentes is a pro at focusing on whole-food family nutrition. This cookbook contains over-fresh and no-bake treats, plus warm drinks, smoothies, and frozen drinks. Clear coding shows which recipes are vegan and which ones omit gluten, dairy, eggs, or nuts. What’s never omitted is kid-approved deliciousness.

While there were many baked treats I couldn’t wait to try, I wanted a quick fix and dove right into making a Matcha Green Tea Frappuccino because I’m all about frozen drinks, no matter the weather. Creamy coconut milk perfectly balanced the matcha’s vegetal notes.

I also made the Coffee Popsicles using coconut milk, instant espresso powder, dates, vanilla extract, and salt. They tasted like a latte on a stick—only better! For kids, swap in decaf.

A two-ingredient recipe that quickly became a must-have in our household was the Homemade Magic Shell. Dark chocolate chips and coconut oil make this magical because it’s no hassle and you know exactly what’s in it. If you’re a label-reader, you’ll know how I feel about the “why are they in there?” list of ingredients found in many foods. This cookbook demonstrates that simple and clean can’t be beat!

 

NowForSomethingSweet cvrNOW FOR SOMETHING SWEET:
Monday Morning Cooking Club

(HarperCollins; $35.00)

The four fabulous women behind Monday Morning Cooking Club have a delectable new Jewish cookbook out called Now for Something Sweet—a title that called to the sweet tooth in me. If you don’t know these ladies, the sisterhood (formed in 2006) is comprised of Lisa Goldberg, Merelyn Frank Chalmers. Natanya Eskin, and Jacqui Israel. Their mission is “to uncover, to persistently test and tweak, and to preserve the many sweet recipes entrusted” to them over their years of collecting. And the results are awesome!

Though I have a long list of recipes I want to try, the one I started with was Hanna Geller Goldsmith’s Chocolate Meringues. Five simple ingredients—dark chocolate, egg whites, salt, caster (superfine) sugar, and vanilla extract—transform into you-can’t-eat-just-one meringue mounds. Bite through the crisp crust for a fudgy middle. These meringues are a step above and will become a welcome addition to my lineup of recipes. Next on my list? Debbie Levi’s Romanian Malai (Polenta Cheesecake), then, for a savory break Leah Koenig’s Onion Pletzels, described as a cross between an onion roll or bialy and a focaccia

I appreciate the specificity of the recipes, reminding me that much of baking is a science. Technical sections like Kitchen Notes (why they use unsalted butter or how to melt chocolate) are balanced with a lovely information about many of the people who contributed the recipes. At the end, in addition to the alphabetically organized index is one sorted into categories: dairy free, gluten free, and for Passover. This at-a-glance reference is truly a time-saver.

 

Click here for another cookbook review.

 

   • Reviewed by Christine Van Zandt (www.ChristineVanZandt.com), Write for Success (www.Write-for-Success.com), @ChristineVZ and @WFSediting, Christine@Write-for-Success.com

 

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