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Middle-Grade Novel Review – The Elephant in the Room

THE ELEPHANT IN THE ROOM

By Holly Goldberg Sloan

(Dial Books; 17.99 Ages 10-14)

 

The Elephant in the Room cvr

 

Starred Review – School Library Journal

In The Elephant in the Room, when middle-schooler, Sila Tekin’s mother is stuck in Turkey trying to get her immigration paperwork in order, the loneliness is almost unbearable for her and her father, Alp. Sila’s newly withdrawn demeanor prompts her school to pair her with autistic classmate Mateo Lopez in a special program that has the kids spending time together at the end of each school day. The point is to help both kids socialize more and, after a slow, silent start, they eventually begin getting to know each other.

Life changes dramatically for Sila and Mateo when Alp is hired to fix an old truck owned by widower, Gio, who lives on a non-working farm on the outskirts of town. Sila and Gio seem to form an immediate bond, even before they discover that Gio’s late wife was Sila’s beloved second-grade teacher. When an odd string of coincidences leads to Gio rescuing a young elephant named Veda from a failing circus, Sila and Mateo wind up with the most awesome summer job ever—caring for Veda. Sila connects to the young pachyderm on a deep level, realizing that, like her, Veda must really miss her mother. A reunion of either mother-daughter pair feels out of reach, but with a team of caring friends—maybe it’s not.

Author Holly Goldberg Sloan has another deeply heartfelt hit on her hands. Again employing the multi-POV device she uses so brilliantly, she lets readers see and feel the unfolding of these extraordinary events through various characters’ eyes. Veda’s POV is used sparingly but impactfully, and even the supporting animal characters—a flock of undisciplined flamingos, a ravenous bear, and a loyal dog—whose POVs we’re not privy to, are well-drawn, quirky, and fun.

Both kids are battling quiet storms within, which makes them interesting and empathetic. Gio is wonderfully complex. His desire to rediscover meaning in life, coupled with voluminous lottery winnings, propel him to take on caring for Veda, somehow feeling it’s something he has to do. His connection with Sila seems similarly fated, and their special bond serves as the glue for all of the characters. A story of hope, longing, love, and action, The Elephant in the Room will show middle-grade readers that things—people, animals, situations—are not always what they seem and that they’re not always as powerless over circumstances as they sometimes feel.

 

Click here to read Ronna’s review of Karol’s debut YA novel, Cursed.

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Can Somebody Please Scratch My Back? by Jory John

CAN SOMEBODY PLEASE SCRATCH MY BACK?
Written by Jory John
Illustrated by Liz Climo
(Dial BYR; $16.99, Ages 4-8)

 

Cover illustration from Can Somebody Please Scratch My Back?

 

Can Somebody Please Scratch My Back?  by Jory John is a great rainy day read aloud for energized kids swinging rain boots and in need of a good giggle while they’re more than likely required to sit, sit, sit in the classroom.

In this story we meet a delightfully frustrated and itchy Elephant desperate for a good back scratch. We all know how good that feels! Elephant groans every time a new friend tries to help. But the bumps, tickles, fangs and other animals’ offerings are far from what our poor pachyderm protagonist needs. When he’s reached his limit and sits down to sob over his situation, a friendly hedgehog comes by.

Hedgehog would love to help, and his body is the perfect level of pokey-ness for the task at hand. Elephant lifts Hedgehog by the trunk and uses him as a back scratcher, gaining immediate relief. So much relief, in fact, that he sighs in utter euphoria and absentmindedly flings Hedgehog away by the trunk.

And now poor Hedgehog is stuck—belly up—in the ground by the very pokey part of his body that previously helped the Elephant. Not only is he stuck, but his belly starts to itch. Won’t anyone help him out? In the bright of day, Sloth notices Hedgehog’s dilemma and offers to help.

Climo’s cartoon illustrations and bubbled read-aloud thoughts of each animal attempting to help the itchy Elephant are silly, fun and perfect for the intended audience. What a great LOL combination!

Read Can Somebody Please Scratch My Back? to find out if Sloth can make it in time to deliver Hedgehog from his agony.

Read a review of Jory John’s Bad Seed.

  • Reviewed by Ozma Bryant

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Making Three Square Meals A Lot of Fun

You Are What You Eat: And Other Mealtime Hazards

41eiew22lul_sl500_aa300_I’ve reviewed a few of Serge Bloch’s books before, and I have loved them all. The cuteness factor of You Are What You Eat: And Other Mealtime Hazards (Sterling, $12.95, ages 4 and up) is off the charts.

This clever little book is basically a list of clichés about food paired with adorable, literal illustrations and photographs to introduce young children to nutrition and also to thoroughly entertain parents. Sometimes the simplest books are the best, and this is certainly one of them! You’ll enjoy reading this with your children. I know I’m going to share my copy with someone very special to me.

debbieglade1Debbie Glade, today’s guest reviewer, is the author, illustrator and voice talent of the award-winning children’s picture book The Travel Adventures of Lilly P Badilly: Costa Rica, published by Smart Poodle Publishing. She visits South Florida schools with her reading, writing and geography programs. For years, Debbie was a travel writer for luxury cruise lines. She writes parenting articles for various websites and is the Geography Awareness Editor for WanderingEducators.com. She blogs daily at smartpoodlepublishing.com.

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