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Kids’ Book Review – The Poisoned Apple

THE POISONED APPLE:

A Fractured Fairy Tale

Written and illustrated by Anne Lambelet

(Page Street Kids; $17.99, Ages 4-8)

 

 

PoisonedApple cover

 

THE REVIEW:

Good effortlessly thwarts evil in this reimagined Snow White story, The Poisoned Apple:  A Fractured Fairy Tale, by author/illustrator Anne Lambelet

Irritated with a princess who is much too wholesome and “sweet” for her own good (how dare she be!), a witch is on the search for rare ingredients to concoct a “single apple-poisoning spell.” Kids will get a kick out of watching the witch carefully collect these ingredients in her hopes of getting rid of the princess once and for all; some ingredients on her list include such delightfully repulsive items as the toenail of a giant monster. 

 

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Interior spread from The Poisoned Apple: A Fractured Fairy Tale written and illustrated by Anne Lambelet, Page Street Kids ©2020.

 

Readers will equally love seeing the spooky font and haunting artistry whenever the words “the poisoned apple” are repeated in the text. It adds to the humor by highlighting the seriousness of the situationthe princess does, after all, accept the apple easily. But the phrase also hints at the unlikeliness of anything dangerous from actually happening due to the ripple effect of kindness. 

Goodness has a way of growing as the princess’s compassion for her hungry friend, one of the seven dwarfs, leads her to give the apple to him. In turn, when he notices “a couple of hungry forest animals,” he passes on the snack to them. They also show pity to a “foraging squirrel” who is “desperate for something to feed her babies.” Kids will erupt with laughter when they notice the horror and disappointment in the witch’s face as her perfect plan crumbles. She follows the squirrel, climbing ever higher and higher on the tree until a hilariously illustrated double-paged spread exposes the natural consequences of her greed. (Readers will enjoy holding the book up vertically to get the full effect). Down and down she falls, and when she comes to, a special gift awaits her, given by the squirrel out of genuine concern. The adage, what comes around goes around, plays out perfectly in this last scene. 

 

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Interior spread from The Poisoned Apple: A Fractured Fairy Tale written and illustrated by Anne Lambelet, Page Street Kids ©2020.

THE ART:

Lambelet’s gorgeous illustrations, rich in texture, muted colors, and geometric shapes capture this intersection of whimsy and mystery. For those who enjoy a bit of dark humor and clever retellings of classic tales, The Poisoned Apple is an excellent choice. NOTE: Remove the jacket cover to enjoy the lovely illustration beneath.

Click here for a fantastic activity guide.

If you’d like to read more fractured fairy tales, click here for a roundup of recommendations.

 

  • Reviewed by Armineh Manookian

 

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Middle Grade Book Review – UnTwisted

UNTWISTED:
Twinchantment Series #2

Written by Elise Allen

(Disney-Hyperion; $16.99, Ages 8-12)

 

Untwisted Twinchantment2 cvr

 

 

In book one, Twinchantment, identical twins Flissa and Sara must act as one person (Princess Flissara) to escape the Kingdom of Kaloon’s Magic Eradication Act which cites twinhood as reason for removal and re-homing. Book two, UnTwisted by Elise Allen, picks up on Ascension Day as the girls officially take their individual places in line for the throne. However, the new Magical Unification Act hasn’t been a simple fix for harmonious living. A top priority in the Kaloonification was bringing together the Mages, Genpos (people without magic from the general population), and Magical Animals at a school called the Maldevon Academy. However, cooperation between the groups is easier said than done, and someone is out to destroy the unity.

Favorite characters of mine from book one continue in UnTwisted: Galric and his adorable black kitten Nitpick, evil lioness Raya, and Loriah—who I’m happy to see has a bigger role. New characters like Zinka enliven the story. Plot misdirection keeps the twins searching for who’s behind the escalating ripples of unrest while they also navigate newfound friendships and how to fit in at school.

Chapters once again alternate viewpoints between Flissa and Sara. Allen successfully extends character development across both books. In UnTwisted, the girls’ individualities take center stage and their sisterly bond fractures. I like how the books show Kaloon progressing from the Magic Eradication Act to the Magical Unification Act, and the problems of both all-or-nothing edicts.

This series will appeal to kids who like books about adventure, magic, and relationships. The delightful Twinchantment novels combine high-stakes action with relatable, dimensional tween issues. It feels there’s more to come from these dynamic twins.

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Children’s Picture Book Review – A Pig in the Palace

A PIG IN THE PALACE

Written and illustrated by Ali Bahrampour

(Abrams BYR; $17.99, Ages 4-8)

 

A Pig in the Palace cvr

 

 

Have you ever received an invitation to dine with royalty? Me neither. And in these pandemic times of non-partying, I doubt one will be forthcoming any time soon. But if I did ever receive one, I’d be very surprisedand that’s exactly the situation in which Bobo the boar finds himself in A Pig in the Palace.

 

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Interior spread from A Pig in the Palace written and illustrated by Ali Bahrampour, Abrams BYR ©2020.

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The story begins with Bobo receiving an invitation to dine at the palace with the new queen whom nobody’s ever seen. Bobo is excited to go but since this is a very new experience for him, he makes several blunders while he is there which causes him to get into deep trouble with the guards who wish to throw him out. The chase is on to catch Bobo, who manages to keep eluding them until the moment the new queen is revealed in a surprising and very hilarious ending that I never even saw coming.

Readers will be rooting for Bobo throughout the story and while this humorous story is told in simple language, it is meant to be read in tandem with the illustrations. The crisp, highly detailed pictures, rendered in pen, ink, and watercolor, tell much of the story that is not told through the text, making this a wonderful book for a shared reading experience with a child as you point out and show what is going on.

 

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Interior artwork from A Pig in the Palace written and illustrated by Ali Bahrampour, Abrams BYR ©2020.

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So since going to real parties is out nowadays, instead, make yourself comfortable with your young reader and enjoy Bahrampour’s A Pig in the Palace. This picture book is perfect pandemic reading about going to a party, with all the fun and silliness of a celebration but without a touch of the preachiness about how to behave at one. It definitely delivers a much needed light-hearted diversion in these troubled times.

• Reviewed by Freidele Galya Soban Biniashvili

 

Click here to order a copy of A Pig in the Palace or visit your local indie bookstore.
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Recommended Reads for the Week of 10/12/20

 

 

 

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