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Picture Book Review – Where’s My Cow?

WHERE’S MY COW?

Written by Susan Blackaby

Illustrated by Scott Brundage

(Sleeping Bear Press; $16.99; Ages 5-8)

 

 

Where's My Cow cover

 

Anxious Egret is afraid to fly beyond the pasture which means leaving his constant companion Cow. That is until Cow devises a way to stand out in a crowd so Egret will know where to fly and find her in Where’s My Cow? a heart-warming story by Susan Blackaby with illustrations by Scott Brundage.

A bucolic setting forms the calm backdrop for this charming picture book. The reader opens the book to sunrise with the herd of cows wandering the pasture, a flock of birds heading off to explore, and one egret in particular perfectly content perched on his friend cow’s head. Why not just remain when there is so much that can go wrong if one goes too far?

 

Where's My Cow int1
Interior spread from Where’s My Cow? written by Susan Blackaby and illustrated by Scott Brundage, Sleeping Bear Press ©2021.

 

The worldly cow with so many stories to tell is the perfect pal for the apprehensive egret. Riding on the cow’s rump, Egret enjoys tales about all the places Cow has been. “She knew about ukuleles and picnics. She discussed kites and kayaks. She had once tasted a toasted marshmallow. The cow’s stories gave the egret ideas.”

Brundage draws uncertainty in the egret’s eyes as he announces one sunny morning that he might be ready to fly. Cow listens with the facial expressions a concerned mom might give to a child whom she knows suffers from a bit of separation anxiety. Cow encourages the bird to see the beach, reinforcing the idea that Cow will be waiting the whole time. The dialogue between the two is so relatable for any child wanting to venture beyond their comfort zone but worried to leave a parent behind.

The problem is realized when the egret flies above the pasture only to look down and see the large herd, uncertain which one is his friend. Egret is so nervous he Ker-thumps to the ground to the surprised cow. “’I didn’t go,” said the egret. “How would I ever find you again?’”

 

Where's My Cow? int2
Interior spread from Where’s My Cow? written by Susan Blackaby and illustrated by Scott Brundage, Sleeping Bear Press ©2021.

 

Blackaby’s creativity is demonstrated with how best an anxious egret could locate his cow friend amongst the herd. The cow wags his ears but that is hard to see. “The cow thought about it. Next time I’ll switch my tail.” Great idea but all the “…tails switched and hitched every which way. Where’s my cow? WHERE’S MY COW?”

The illustrations of sea and sand take the reader along on the journey with Egret looking for ways to make the cow stand out. And with every bit of confidence he gains knowing he can now locate the cow, the egret creates his own adventures. The patient cow goes along with ribbons, seashells, and sticks tied to his body never complaining like any parent would do. “And at the end of the day, when the rosy sky is full of birds and the pasture is full of cows, the little egret wonders, Where’s my cow? And there she is.”

This book is recommended for any child wanting to explore the world but worried that their parent will not be there upon their return. This is a relatable story and a reassuring read to share before a young child goes off to their first birthday party, playdate, or any event that will separate them from those with whom they feel comfortable and safe.

  • Reviewed by Ronda Einbinder

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Kids Book Review – Carl and the Meaning of Life by Deborah Freedman

CARL AND THE MEANING OF LIFE
Written and Illustrated by Deborah Freedman
(Viking BYR; $17.99, Ages 3-5)

 

Carl and the Meaning of Life book cvr art

 

 

Starred Reviews – Booklist, School Library Connection, School Library Journal

Have you or your children ever questioned why you do what you do? Have you ever wondered about your purpose in life? Sigh, I’m guessing we all have! In this sweet and heartwarming story, the reader walks the path with Carl the earthworm as he searches for answers to these deep questions. Author and illustrator Deborah Freedman introduces us to her seventh picture book, Carl and the Meaning of Life, which tells the tale of the little orange earthworm as he wanders through the water colored painted countryside. The cover introduces the reader to Carl slithering through the letter “C” as he happily roams underground. Meanwhile the fox, mouse, squirrel and rabbit explore the land up above, and the title addresses that big philosophical question.

 

CarI Interior Image 3
Interior illustration from Carl and the Meaning of Life written and illustrated by Deborah Freedman, Viking BYR ©2019.

 

Carl is not the typical main character we find in animal stories. He is an earthworm. And as an earthworm, he is perfectly content tunneling through the soil below our feet. Carl is turning hard dirt into fluffy soil, day after day ….

 

Carl Interior Image 4
Interior illustration from Carl and the Meaning of Life written and illustrated by Deborah Freedman, Viking BYR ©2019.

 

Perching his head up to the service one day, Carl is confronted by a field mouse who asks the question, Why? Why do you do that? And this is where Carl begins his journey. Our innocent main character stops making fluffy soil and does what many of us do when we are in search of an answer; searches out others to seek their knowledge.

 

Carl Interior Image 5
Interior illustrations from Carl and the Meaning of Life written and illustrated by Deborah Freedman, Viking BYR ©2019.

 

When Carl asks the rabbit why she does what she does the rabbit replies, “I do not know. I do what I do for my babies!”  Carl does not have babies so continues to search for an answer throughout the forest.

 

Carl Interior Image 6
Interior illustration from Carl and the Meaning of Life written and illustrated by Deborah Freedman, Viking BYR ©2019.

 

Deborah Freedman’s lush green countryside is inhabited by the fox who likes to hunt; the squirrel who likes to plant trees for sleep; and the bear who searches for berries. But as the reader turns the page, the luscious green grass turns to brown and no one is left for Carl to talk to.  Carl is now confronted with a sad beetle and soil that is not so fluffy. It is that moment for Carl when he realizes he needs to go back underground to do what he does best, so the other animals can do what they do best. How? Well, why not ask Carl?

 

Carl Interior Image 7
Interior illustration from Carl and the Meaning of Life written and illustrated by Deborah Freedman, Viking BYR ©2019.

 

This thought provoking story is a wonderful conversation opener with students in a classroom, or kids at home, by reminding them that everyone has a purpose, no matter how big or small; even the smallest creatures actions can touch us all. So the next time you are sitting outdoors and a squirrel runs by and you wonder, “What is he doing?” Think of Carl and every creature in this book, and remember that we are all connected because all creatures have an important job. I know I will not look at an earthworm the same again!

  • Reviewed by Ronda Einbinder
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