Skip to content

Picture Book Review – Sallie Bee Writes a Thank-You Note

SALLIE BEE WRITES A THANK-YOU NOTE

Written by Courtney Sheinmel & Susan Verde

Illustrated by Heather Ross

(Abrams BYR; $17.99; Ages 4-8)

Sallie Bee Writes a Thank You Note cover Sallie on scooter mailing note

 

Certified yoga and mindfulness instructor, and NY Times bestselling author, Susan Verde has done it again! As a fan of Verde’s books, I Am Peace, and I Am Yoga, I wasn’t surprised that Sallie Bee Writes A Thank-You Note, co-written with Courtney Sheinmel, would leave a smile on my face.

Illustrator Heather Ross introduces readers to the big brown-eyed main character with bee-design ponytail holders, and her constant companion cat faithfully by her side. The two are eagerly standing on the steps of her porch greeting the mail carrier who has a surprise for Sallie. “It was not Sallie’s birthday. It was not a holiday. It was just an ordinary day.” Grandma Bee knitted a stripey scarf for Sallie, (note the same bee color scheme) and surprised her with this heartfelt gift. Included with the gift, Grandma has written a note telling Sallie that the scarf was made just for her.

Sallie knows she must thank her grandma for this kind gift, and being from the cell phone generation, she tells her mom she needs to borrow her smartphone to send a quick text. Well, Dr. Bee is busy sending and receiving texts of her own, and five minutes … “And ten minutes after that, she was still on the phone.” The relatable illustrations show Sallie and the cat desperately trying to pass the time rolling on the ground with the scarf. Eventually, the cat falls asleep on her lap. Ross’s spot art perfectly and humorously plays off the text that will resonate with kids and adults.

 

Sallie Bee Writes a Thank You Note int1 Sallie composing text
Interior art from Sallie Bee Writes a Thank-You Note written by Courtney Sheinmel and Susan Verde and illustrated by Heather Ross, Abrams BYR ©2022.

 

Still needing to stay busy while waiting for the phone, Sallie decides to write down what she will put in that text (if Mom ever gets off the phone). She starts with the basic “Thanks, Grandma” but realizes she needs to tell Grandma how happy the scarf made her feel. When Mom returns dressed in her blue scrubs (it was nice to see Mom wearing a Jewish star necklace), she notices Sallie has written quite a lot and tells her that she just needs to sign her name and put it in the mail. Sallie excitedly adds squiggles to her note and walks with her mom to drop her thank you in the mailbox (with a stamp, of course).

Sallie enjoyed writing that first thank-you note so much that she waits for another package to arrive the next day, but no package arrives. When Sallie safely crosses the busy street with the crossing guard in one scene, and after she’s given an umbrella by her bus buddy in another, she realizes these gestures are thank-you note worthy. She begins to pass out thank-you notes to express her appreciation, each one ending with Love, Sallie. The smile on recipients’ faces tells the reader everything they need to know. Sallie even leaves a thank-you note for her brother, Jack, for not letting his tarantula out of his cage and into her bedroom. It’s also sweet for readers to see Sallie receive a surprise envelope in the mail. This time it’s a letter thanking her for showing all the reasons to write a thank-you note, signed Love, Mom.

 

Sallie Bee Writes a Thank You Note int2 note for lunch lady
Interior spread from Sallie Bee Writes a Thank-You Note written by Courtney Sheinmel and Susan Verde and illustrated by Heather Ross, Abrams BYR ©2022.

 

This much-needed story about one child’s thoughtfulness in acknowledging others’ kindness shows kids how something as simple as offering gratitude via a handwritten note can change a person’s day. The back matter is a letter written to the reader explaining how they too can write a letter of thanks. The letter is signed by Courtney and Susan with suggestions such as writing what you are thankful for and how it makes you feel. My brain swirled with ideas of teachers working within their curriculum using this book to help kids compose thank-you notes, practicing communication skills and handwriting too. It’s also a fun project for a child to do with a grown-up at home. Sallie Bee Writes a Thank-You Note also serves as a great reminder to adults to put down their cell phones, engage with their kids, and even pick up a pen now and then.

  • Reviewed by Ronda Einbinder

 

 

Share this:

Picture Book Review – How to Change the World in 12 Easy Steps

HOW TO CHANGE THE WORLD
IN 12 EASY STEPS

Written by Peggy Porter Tierney

Illustrated by Marie Letourneau

(Tanglewood Publishing; $15.99, Ages 4-8)

 

How to Change the World cover

 

Starred Review –Kirkus

 

Before reading How to Change the World in 12 Easy Steps, a new picture book written by Peggy Porter Tierney and illustrated by Marie Letourneau, I had not heard about Eva Mozes Kor, the inspiration for this story. I wish I’d had the opportunity to attend one of the talks that she did around the country before she passed away in 2019. If you know what she experienced as a Mengele twin in Auschwitz, yet still survived along with her twin, Miriam, you’ll want to read about and share the wisdom she imparted that has likely positively influenced thousands of school children over the decades.

What I like most about this book is its simplicity and straightforwardness. It’s always encouraging and is never didactic. Rather, it’s full of common-sense suggestions that can bring more meaning and fulfillment into a child’s life. I loved the first spread in which a little girl says she can’t find her phone (in her messy bedroom) and her friend offers to help her clean up. “Start small” is that first step, and it’s one I often use for myself and my kids. The difference in Letourneau’s before and after illustrations are as calming for a reader as being in the tidy room must feel for the two girls.

 

How to Change the World int page5
Interior art from How to Change the World in 12 Easy Steps written by Peggy Porter Tierney and illustrated by Marie Letourneau, Tanglewood Publishing ©2021.

 

Not all of the examples presented are about doing good deeds. One of them says “Just be the best you that you can be.” Letourneau’s charming art shows a boy in a still life painting class content with the smiling-faced banana he’s finished painting while his classmates are still busy at work creating their own masterpieces. Another powerful two pages are devoted to forgiveness and how doing so can rid oneself of anger allowing more space for happiness. While this might be the most difficult concept for a child to integrate, it’s definitely one of the most rewarding. It was certainly Eva Mozes Kor’s overarching philosophy and what kept her going despite all the hardship she endured.

How to Change the World int page9
Interior art from How to Change the World in 12 Easy Steps written by Peggy Porter Tierney and illustrated by Marie Letourneau, Tanglewood Publishing ©2021.

 

While a fast read, How to Change the World in 12 Easy Steps, is also an important and timely one. Parents, caregivers, and teachers can choose to read either quickly or slowly leaving room for numerous conversations. I can see elements of tikkun olam at play in Tierney’s prose. In Judaism, this is the aspiration to behave and act constructively and beneficially—improving the world essentially, something Eva Mozes Kor was deeply committed to. The caring messages Tierney conveys, coupled with Letourneau’s diverse and emotive characters would make this book a welcome addition to any bookshelf. What a wonderful book to share with and inspire children as we approach the new year.

  • Reviewed by Ronna Mandel

 

Share this:

Picture Book Review – Terrific Table Manners

 

TERRIFIC TABLE MANNERS

Written by Michelle Markel

Illustrated by Merrilee Liddiard

(Cameron Kids; $17.99, Ages 5-7)

 

 

 

 

As the busy holiday season approaches, I can’t think of a more timely book to share with your children than Terrific Table Manners, a humorous 64-page illustrated manual written by Michelle Markel with art by Merrilee Liddiard. The publisher’s blurb says, “Inspired by the classic Tiffany’s primer on manners for teens and featuring a familiar cast of characters, Terrific Table Manners is a modern take on table etiquette that follows the course of a proper dinner-party meal.”

To expand on that introduction, I’ll add how enjoyable I found this thoroughly modern approach to 21st-century manners geared for a younger reader. The primer is presented in rhyme (with a smattering of snark) and complemented by retro art with ample white space, lovely linework, and warm tones in a watercolor style. Aptly beginning with the invitation and RSVP chapters, Terrific Table Manners proceeds to the meal itself including the main course, vegetables, and dessert through to the dare-I-say dreaded and oft avoided thank you note.

 

Terrific Table Manners int1
Interior spread from Terrific Table Manners written by Michelle Markel and illustrated by Merrilee Liddiard, Cameron Kids ©2021.

 

Kids will learn about what to do and what not to do at a dinner party as they’re guided through by Mr. Faris (who went to manners school in Paris) and his co-host/teacher Prudence at the School of Manners and Etiquette. Together these instructors also cover essentials such as making conversation to which silverware to use for which course. That’s not all that matters during a meal. I was delighted to see cell phones mentioned and by mentioned I mean recommended to be shut off! “Cut the chicken off the bone. Bella, please turn off your phone.” While I did wonder how many 5-7 year-olds (the target audience) have telephones, I figured this might be a book an older tween sibling would enjoy since good manners apply to all ages.

 

 

Terrific Table Manners int2
Interior art from Terrific Table Manners written by Michelle Markel and illustrated by Merrilee Liddiard, Cameron Kids ©2021.

 

One of my favorite lines in the book happens during the main course. “Don’t hold utensils with your fists! Only cavemen eat like this!” Sound familiar? As the dinner-party class progresses, the children get more out-of-hand and the teacher/hosts become more frustrated and exhausted. Young readers and their parents may find this aspect the most relatable. Having kids sit still at a meal has often been a sore point in many families, and holiday time is no exception. Keeping chaos at bay is crucial to the etiquette pros but ultimately they don’t succeed as witnessed in the last two closing spreads.

 

 

Terrific Table Manners int3
Interior spread from Terrific Table Manners written by Michelle Markel and illustrated by Merrilee Liddiard, Cameron Kids ©2021

 

 

Perhaps all has not been for naught when readers see the lovely thank you notes at the end. Will children finish the book and admit they’ve gleaned a tip or two? We can only hope so! The two pages of back matter detail specific aspects of a dinner party, gently encouraging kids to use proper etiquette and see what a difference it makes even at home and in restaurants. 

  • Reviewed by Ronna Mandel
Share this:

Children’s Picture Book Review – A Pig in the Palace

A PIG IN THE PALACE

Written and illustrated by Ali Bahrampour

(Abrams BYR; $17.99, Ages 4-8)

 

A Pig in the Palace cvr

 

 

Have you ever received an invitation to dine with royalty? Me neither. And in these pandemic times of non-partying, I doubt one will be forthcoming any time soon. But if I did ever receive one, I’d be very surprisedand that’s exactly the situation in which Bobo the boar finds himself in A Pig in the Palace.

 

A Pig in the Palace int1
Interior spread from A Pig in the Palace written and illustrated by Ali Bahrampour, Abrams BYR ©2020.

e

The story begins with Bobo receiving an invitation to dine at the palace with the new queen whom nobody’s ever seen. Bobo is excited to go but since this is a very new experience for him, he makes several blunders while he is there which causes him to get into deep trouble with the guards who wish to throw him out. The chase is on to catch Bobo, who manages to keep eluding them until the moment the new queen is revealed in a surprising and very hilarious ending that I never even saw coming.

Readers will be rooting for Bobo throughout the story and while this humorous story is told in simple language, it is meant to be read in tandem with the illustrations. The crisp, highly detailed pictures, rendered in pen, ink, and watercolor, tell much of the story that is not told through the text, making this a wonderful book for a shared reading experience with a child as you point out and show what is going on.

 

A Pig in the Palace int2
Interior artwork from A Pig in the Palace written and illustrated by Ali Bahrampour, Abrams BYR ©2020.

e

So since going to real parties is out nowadays, instead, make yourself comfortable with your young reader and enjoy Bahrampour’s A Pig in the Palace. This picture book is perfect pandemic reading about going to a party, with all the fun and silliness of a celebration but without a touch of the preachiness about how to behave at one. It definitely delivers a much needed light-hearted diversion in these troubled times.

• Reviewed by Freidele Galya Soban Biniashvili

 

Click here to order a copy of A Pig in the Palace or visit your local indie bookstore.
e
Disclosure: Good Reads With Ronna is now a Bookshop.org affiliate and will make a small commission from the books sold via this site at no extra cost to you. If you’d like to help support this blog, its team of kidlit reviewers as well as independent bookshops nationwide, please consider purchasing your books from Bookshop.org using our affiliate links above (or below). Thanks!

Recommended Reads for the Week of 10/12/20

 

 

 

Share this:
Back To Top