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Best New Children’s Books for Father’s Day 2023

FATHER’S DAY BOOKS

~ A ROUNDUP ~

 

 

 

REVIEWS:

Dads Can Do It All Cover dads doing many activitiesDADS CAN DO IT ALL!
Written by Ted Maass
Illustrated by Ekaterina Trukhan

(Grosset & Dunlap; 8.99, Ages 0-3)

I reviewed Moms Can Do It All! last month and am happy to share its equally charming companion, Dads Can Do It All! with you.

Maass and Trukhan engage children with their easy rhyme and vibrant art in this 18-page board book. “There are dads who sing songs and write music with words, and there are dads who take care of dogs, cats, and birds.” Little ones are encouraged to believe in themselves and in what they might be one day. Dads are shown role modeling in myriad jobs from mail carriers, farmers, construction workers, chefs, and nurses to firefighters, clerks, hairstylists, astronauts, and homemakers. The variety of occupations depicted can open the door for discussing all kinds of positions people have at an age when children love to dress up and play pretend. 

Like the companion board book, here readers are treated to bold colors and simply shaped characters that will capture and hold young ones’ attention. With its convenient bookplate for personalization, this book can be gifted to new dads by anyone including baby! • Reviewed by Ronna Mandel

 

Papá’s Magical Water-Jug ClockPapas Magical Water-Jug Clock cover boy giving out water
Written by  Jesús Trejoa
Illustrated by Eliza Kinkz
(Minerva; $18.99, Ages 3-6)

If you enjoy picture books that entertain on many levels and are more than a Father’s Day book, that’s what you’ll get with this delightful debut from Jesús Trejoa, a popular Mexican American comedian. The multiple hooks of this father-son tale such as humor, gardening and equipment, animals and nature, diversity, and grown-up jobs, will pull in young readers. The family closeness and joyful illustrations will keep them reading.

Is Papá’s water-jug clock truly magical? That’s what children will find out as little Jesús joins his father on a hot and busy Saturday to help out in the family landscaping business. “Remember to drink lots of agua,” his mama reminds him with some innocent foreshadowing before her son starts loading up the van. Papá has already told Jesús that when the water runs out the work day is over meaning the water jug serves as a clock as well as a much-needed source of hydration. That is if Jesús didn’t give away so much water at each home they visited!

Jesús encounters animals every place they go. First cats, then a dog, and even peacocks. Kids should note the ever-present purple skateboard throughout that whimsically provides rides for these creatures along the way. Is the lad deliberately being mischievous by offering water to the animals because he wants to use it up and end the day early or because he genuinely is concerned about the animals’ welfare and doesn’t realize the repercussions of his actions? It’s magical, right?

Then there’s Jesús’s hard labor on such a hot day. Readers see him frequently splash water on his face to cool off. It is fun watching what Jesús gets up to because of Kinkz’s childlike, loose-lined art, created using multimedia including pencil, ink, watercolor, gouache, crayons, and queso. In addition to the magical water jug, I always find it magical when the art and prose pair so harmoniously as they do here.

When eventually Jesús tells Papá that the jug is empty, Papá explains that the jug is not really magical and there are many more stops before they can go home. Beyond surprised at this revelation, the little boy worries he’ll be fired, unaware of the simple solution – request water at the next stop. Once reality sets in, the father and son team must make tracks to finish up all the while having laughs along the way. Now Jesús can appreciate that “Time and water are precious. We don’t want to waste them.” The sweet love between father and son is palpable on every page, and the gentle life lesson conveyed makes this a “read again” story. Don’t miss the comical endpapers too! Also available in Spanish – El Barrilito Mágico de Papá. • Reviewed by Ronna Mandel.

 

Ramen for Everyone cover boy with bowl of ramenRAMEN FOR EVERYONE
Written by Patricia Tanumihardja
Illustrated by Shiho Pate
(Atheneum BYR; $18.99; Ages 4-8)

A March/April 2023 Indie Next Pick
A Junior Library Guild Selection

Another great father/son bonding book is Patricia Tanumihardja’s Ramen For Everyone with illustrations rendered in sumi ink, pencil, and digital media by Shiho Pate. The main character, Hiro, has been studying Dad’s technique of cooking the perfect bowl of ramen every Sunday night for as long as he can remember. But when his seventh birthday arrives, Hiro decides he’s ready to make ramen for the family.

With illustrations of Dad chopping the meat, seasoning the broth, and cutting the vegetables it’s hard not to want to run out and get a bowl of ramen—or better yet make it yourself. Let’s make ramen! Hiro says standing beside Dad at the cooking block. Yes, chef! Dad responds with his arms poised straight by his side. The roles have now been reversed! Hiro’s hair is pulled back in a grey cap as he Thwacks, Thumps, and Bumps his way into the kitchen attempting to make the noodles soft and springy. You got this! His dad says supporting him from the side.

Mom, sister Mia, Dad, and dog Sushi watch as the eggs slip through Hiro’s fingers and the pork falls apart. Shiho Pate perfectly depicts anger on Hiro’s face as Dinner is ruined! He throws the food in the trash. Dad sits crossed-legged on the kitchen floor with his hand on Hiro’s head. It isn’t perfect like yours, Hiro says. Ramen doesn’t have to be perfect, Dad replies.

Hiro and Dad return to the kitchen together to create a meal that both Mom and Mia will enjoy. Cheesy ramen for Mom, Asian Pears for Mia, and for Dad, who loves Hawaiian pizza, pieces of pineapple are a delight in his bowl.

The back matter tells how Ramen is a popular Japanese noodle of Chinese origin and how it has been popularized over the last few years in the United States. Tanumihardja also lists Kitchen Rules telling kids that cooking is fun but you need to wash your hands. Great cooking also takes time. Reading Ramen for Everyone together is a terrific way to get a father and son (or daughter) into the kitchen to create dishes. An Easy Miso Ramen recipe is included and introduces new dishes to add to the family menu. So, if you don’t feel like cooking, you can always bring in ramen bowls this Father’s Day.
• Reviewed by Ronda Einbinder.

 

When Daddy Tucks Me In cover girl hugging father WHEN DADDY TUCKS ME IN
Written by Sacha Cotter
Illustrated by Josh Morgan
(Sourcebooks Jabberwocky; $18.99, Ages 4+)

The little girl narrator of this charming picture book rushes out of bed to greet her daddy after he returns home from his medical job that involves working late. Early on we’re clued into the important role of keys in this imaginative story when the girl notes the “jingle, jangle, jingle in the lock of our door.”

From here on in, readers are treated to a slew of fun-sounding, made-up words such as when the little girl proclaims her dad is the “… best tucker-in-er-er in the whole wide world.” On top of that, onomatopeia is peppered throughout the story adding to its read-aloud appeal. We quickly realize how Dad’s packed keychain unlocks the heart of this tale as the narrator inquires about what each key is used for. Is she stalling for time with her dad? It doesn’t matter because we are curious too!

The lumpy, bumpy key leads to Dad’s yarn about a fantastical Zippenburger that takes him zippling off to work with a “Zippeny, zappeny, zippen …” A tiny key unlocks a treasure chest that’s hidden away and only he can find using his
“pirate’s map.” Morgan has filled every spread with whimsical details that one look will not suffice. His art, created in Adobe Photoshop using digital painting and found textures, will hold your child’s attention and delight them. In this particular illustration, there’s a swinging monkey in a pearl necklace, a chest filled with gold, a spider, a snake, and even the little girl’s cat who manages to insert himself into every humorous scene. As a cookie lover, my favorite key is the curly, curvy one that opens the door at her dad’s workplace to a cookie-making machine and conveyor belt. There Dad sits stuffing his face. With each key’s purpose conjuring up wild tales such as the one to a corral where Dad’s woolly mammoth Stanley lives or the one that opens a rocket so Dad can collect space noodles, threads of your child’s dreams are being sewn.

As the story and your child wind down, Cotter brings readers back to the key that started us off, the simple metal one that opens the front door to the narrator’s house and to her! What a satisfying way to end When Daddy Tucks Me In and send your little one off to sleep. • Reviewed by Ronna Mandel.

 

Daddy Dressed Me cover girl hugging dad who sewsDADDY DRESSED ME
Written by Michael Gardner and Ava Gardner
Illustrated by Nadia Fisher
(Aladdin BYR; $18.99; Ages 4-8)

Daddy Dressed Me is co-written by thirty-nine-year-old fashion blogger, Michael Gardner, and his confident and thoughtful young daughter, Ava Gardner, who loves pink, getting manicures, and modeling her dad’s unique creations. That alone should fill your heart and give you a reason to read this book with your own child.

The digitally rendered illustrations by Nadia Fisher open to Dad and Ava back to back with Dad wearing an apron for cooking, standing next to a toolbox for building, and cans of paint on the floor for decorating. He’s good at making things.

We see him cooking and painting a mural but what Daddy was best at was sewing. He makes dresses for Ava every year for the holidays and a dress for the Daddy-Daughter dance. When Daddy drops Ava off for Kindergarten, Ava chooses to make a picture frame for Daddy during arts and crafts. But when Miss Sydney announces that everyone should dress in their best clothes for Move Up Day (saying goodbye to Kindergarten and hello to first grade) Ava begins to worry. Would they still make crafts? What about story time?

During dinner, Daddy asks Ava how school was and she tells him about Move Up Day and that she is worried about reciting a poem. Maybe I can make you a special dress, Daddy suggests to Ava who melts into his hug. We see drawings of different dress choices for Ava to choose from. Together they go to the store to find the perfect fabric and Ava finds one that a real princess would wear. She draws a picture of her dream dress. Daddy is a bit worried that it may be complicated but he agrees. Together they practice the poem while Ava helps Daddy with the dress. Ava’s words flowed with more confidence and Daddy’s sewing machine began to whir faster than ever before. When Miss Sydney called Ava’s name she recited the poem perfectly wrapped in the dress that Daddy designed.

The back matter explains the story behind the story of how Michael Gardner used creativity as a way to process his internal struggles. He says, “God turned my pain into power.” Gardner dedicates this book to the memory of his firstborn daughter, Madison-Sole, whose blessed memory he honors in all that he does. This story beautifully highlights what determination, patience, and love can do. • Reviewed by Ronda Einbinder.

 

SOON TO BE RELEASED:

The Coolest Beard cover boy helping dad shaveTHE COOLEST BEARD
Written by Betty Tekle
Illustrated by Nicholas Alexander
(Albert Whitman; $18.99; Ages 4-8, Preorder now, releasing 6/22)

Tenderness and empathy abound in storyteller Betty Tekle’s picture book The Coolest Beard, in which a boy goes with his father to the barbershop and sees the kindness that is shown between his dad and the men who talk about ‘grown folks’ business while getting haircuts and beard trims.

The adults are seated talking on a couch, a cane leaning on Mr. Williams’ knee, but when young Isaac asks, when I grow a beard, I can talk and listen to grown folks’ business? His dad responds, By the time you get a beard, you’ll be one of the grown folks. Nicolas Alexander’s colorful detailed drawings illustrate the Black cultural tradition of the barbershop as a community and family space. And his drawings of the father’s long furry beard are the envy of young Isaac. Some of my favorite illustrations are the humorous spot art pictures of Isaac imagining himself with a beard.

Isaac does not have the patience to wait for a beard to grow, so he rubs Dad’s beard oil all over his face to speed up the process. The adorable illustrations of father and son in the bathroom with Dad rubbing the oil on his beard are made sweeter when we see Isaac doing the same.

Week 1: Nothing yet; Week 2: Still nothing. His cute little dog is intently staring at him and waiting for the beard to grow. By the time he reaches Week 6, Dad’s beard oil has been used up and he wonders if olive oil may do the trick.

When Saturday morning barbershop time comes around, Isaac and his doggy see that his face is as soft and empty as the day before. Isaac feels awful about using up the beard oil and confesses to Mom and Dad. Dad says that going with him to the barbershop will make him feel better.

That’s when Cliff the barber has a plan and places Isaac in the barber chair. When Isaac opens his eyes, he sees that Cliff has rubbed shaving cream all over his cheeks and chin resembling Santa Claus. Now that he has his version of a beard, Isaac is invited over to talk with the grown folks learning that Mr. Williams has broken his hip and that Dad has offered to run errands for him. Other guys offer to help as well. I didn’t realize that grown folks’ business is just adults helping each other, Isaac thinks when Dad offers Mr. Williams money to pay his bills since he’s unable to work. Isaac now sees that it’s not just the beard that makes his dad cool, but his care and generosity toward his friends.

Though not out yet, The Coolest Beard celebrates this unique aspect of fatherhood while honoring the men in children’s lives who teach their kids about acts of loving-kindness. Preorder today. • Reviewed by Ronda Einbinder.

 

MORE RECOMMENDED READS FOR FATHER’S DAY

Daddy and Me cover multiple dads kidsDADDY AND ME
Written by Gary Urda
Illustrated by Rosie Butcher
(Little Bee Books; $8.99, Ages 0-3)

 

 

 

A Bed of Stars cover dad son in truck stargazingA BED OF STARS
Written and illustrated by Jessica Love
(Candlewick Press; $18.99, Ages 4-8)

 

 

 

How To Catch a Daddysaurus cover assorted toolsHOW TO CATCH A DADDYSAURUS
Written by Alice Walstead
Illustrated by Andy Elkerton
(Sourcebooks Wonderland; $10.99, Ages 4-8)

 

 

 

Daddy & Me Side by Side cover father son walking in woodsDADDY & ME, SIDE BY SIDE
Written by Pierce Freelon and Nadia Fisher 
Illustrated by Nadia Fisher
(Little, Brown BYR; $18.99, Ages 4-8)

 

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Picture Book Review – The Path

THE PATH

Written and illustrated by Bob Staake

(mineditionUS; $18.99, Ages 4-8)

The Path cover

 

This is the time of year when many people attend graduations. And not just high school and college graduations. They go to all kinds of graduations from kindergarten to massage school and lots more in between. But the road taken may have been long and winding with obstacles and indecisiveness. And what of the road ahead? That’s why it’s so lovely to have a book such as The Path by Bob Staake that celebrates the journey as much as the accomplishment. In other words, this book is ideal not just for the graduate, but for celebrating individuality as well.

 

The Path int1
Interior spread from The Path written and illustrated by Bob Staake, mineditionUS/Astra Publishing ©2022.

 

Acclaimed New Yorker cover artist and author and/or illustrator of more than 50 books, Bob Staake brings readers both young and old a picture book that simply and gorgeously addresses the highs and lows of life’s pathways. They are not always straightforward.

 

The Path int2
Interior spread from The Path written and illustrated by Bob Staake, mineditionUS/Astra Publishing ©2022.

 

Written in second person, the prose does not always promise that things will be easy and that’s the honesty that appeals to me. It’s also how Staake’s stunning illustrations and color palette convey this message. The path doesn’t always lead to ribbons and rainbows. But as things begin looking up for the traveler, the colors begin to lighten up, too.

 

The Path int3
Interior spread from The Path written and illustrated by Bob Staake, mineditionUS/Astra Publishing ©2022.

 

This is a picture book about possibilities. It’s not just about the path we choose but about our outlook, and our perspective. I think reading The Path together with kids can help them not only look at what choices exist but it can also help them understand what taking each one will mean, and how to forge their own unique way in the world. What a super conversation starter for parents, caregivers, and teachers about self-reliance at an age when children are beginning to assert their independence.

Find an exclusive bonus print from Bob Staake inside the jacket.

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Early Graphic Novel – Burt the Beetle Doesn’t Bite!

BURT THE BEETLE DOESN’T BITE!

Written and illustrated by Ashley Spires

(Kids Can Press; $12.99, Ages 5-8)

 

 

burt the beetle doesnt bite cover

 

 

Sticky Burt is a bug who hugs!

 

Burt the Beetle Doesn’t Bite! is the first in a new series by Ashley Spires, the author and illustrator of The Most Magnificent Thing and the Binky adventure series.

Meet Burt, he’s a ten-lined June (or watermelon) beetle. Burt has feathered antennae, a large body, a sticky abdomen, and can flail his legs when he falls on his back (but needs assistance flipping over). He notices that other insects have special or “super” abilities. A bumblebee is a “super hard worker” and ants can carry heavy loads. So what makes Burt special? Well, he’s trying to figure this out. As Burt meets more insects and learns about their amazing features, he wonders what his “super” ability is. Would winking count? How about hanging out around porch lights? Trying to imitate other insects’ super abilities doesn’t work either and Burt continually ends up on his back.

 

Burt The Beetle int2-3
Interior artwork from Burt the Beetle Doesn’t Bite! written and illustrated by Ashley Spires, Kids Can Press ©2021.

 

When Burt discovers a spider web with insects trapped in it, he’s amazed to find that their super abilities cannot free them from the web. As the venomous spider taunts Burt, he realizes he does have some super abilities. Burt’s a hugger and he happens to be sticky, too. Furthermore, he’s big and heavy enough to tear up the spider’s web when he falls on it, saving the other insects–and landing on his back once again. This time he has very grateful friends to help him flip over!

Burt The Beetle int4-5
Interior artwork from Burt the Beetle Doesn’t Bite! written and illustrated by Ashley Spires, Kids Can Press ©2021.

 

Cheerful and upbeat humor shines in this book. Commenting on his feathery antennae, Burt notes “it’s a style choice.” Gentle quips are exchanged between characters. When the spider, firmly stuck to Burt’s abdomen, asks “is this ever going to end?” Burt replies “I guess you’re stuck with me. Get it?” Exaggerated bodies and expressive faces, especially “bug” eyes, add to the enjoyment. 

 

Burt The Beetle int18-19
Interior artwork from Burt the Beetle Doesn’t Bite! written and illustrated by Ashley Spires, Kids Can Press ©2021.

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Spires has created a graphic novel designed for younger readers, especially those new to the graphic novel format. The panels are clean and well organized, without a lot of distractions. The number of characters and speech bubbles in a panel are kept to a minimum and the print is bold and slightly larger than usual.  This book is appropriate for independent readers or as a read-aloud for emerging readers.  

The book includes some themes which could be used to invite children to discuss character and friendship. Burt’s search for what makes him unique is something children also explore for themselves. Perseverance is a challenge for children, but Burt’s positive “can do” type of behavior in the face of repeated failures may encourage them to keep trying. He takes care of his friends and “doesn’t bite because that’s not how you make friends.”

Lastly, this graphic novel engages children in the natural world around them, weaving in factual information about insects and including “awesome insect super facts” in the back matter. Hopefully, it will inspire children to continue exploring the world of insects and their “super” abilities. 

  • Reviewed by Dornel Cerro
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Kids Picture Book Review – Jacob’s Fantastic Flight

JACOB’S FANTASTIC FLIGHT

Written and illustrated by Philip Waechter

Translated by Elisabeth Lauffer

(Blue Dot Kids Press; $17.95; Ages 3-8)

 

 

Jacobs Fantastic Flight cvr

 

Starred Reviews – Booklist, Kirkus, and Publishers Weekly

 

What better way to travel to the sea than to fly, and I don’t mean by airplane! Jacob’s Fantastic Flight, by German author illustrator Philip Waechter, and translated by Elisabeth Lauffer, takes the reader on Jacob’s family vacation where he foregoes flying by plane with mom and dad, and instead sets off with courage to fly solo.

Waechter begins his whimsical tale by introducing readers to baby Jacob, flying before walking and surrounded by his parents, mouths agape, as their baby takes flight from his carriage to beyond the treetops. Each page pulls the reader in with colorful illustrations and intricate detail. Waechter’s vision of the story is beautifully expressed in his uplifting art.

At first his parents were pretty concerned because having a kid like that was a little weird. But they soon got used to him flying and figured, “So be it—he’s our son, and he’s perfect just the way he is!” And he’s quite helpful when he flies to the top of a tree to pick the big red apple!

 

Jacobs Fantastic Flight
Interior spread from Jacob’s Fantastic Flight written and illustrated by Philip Waechter, Blue Dot Kids Press ©2020.

 

As Jacob grows bigger, the family decides it’s time to take a vacation to the sea. After accompanying his parents to the airport, Jacob then waves goodbye and takes off flying on his own. Here begins the real adventure for the boy as he befriends birds, a flock of 83, while admiring the scenery along the way. He saw blue mountain lakes and golden wheat fields and smelled meadows full of flowers—beautiful!

Soon a notorious new character is introduced, Mr. Mortar, the evil birdcatcher. It wasn’t long before a little bird blundered into his net. When Jacob and the birds realize their count is off they work together to devise a plan and save their bird pal Hubert, with Jacob taking the lead.

 

Jacobs Fantastic Flight 2
Interior spread from Jacob’s Fantastic Flight written and illustrated by Philip Waechter, Blue Dot Kids Press ©2020.

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Jacob finally catches up with his very happy parents who welcome him with hugs and kisses. I can only imagine the worry they must have felt thinking their son was flying alone. The family of three turned into a family of four as Hubert the rescued bird was now included in the family trip.

For all those kids who have imagined themselves flying, this is a wonderful adventure. It is also a heartwarming and much needed story about a boy whose difference is also his special power, one that gives him confidence, self-esteem and courage. This is a great conversation starter about helping others in need.

 

  •  Reviewed by Ronda Skernick Einbinder

 

Click here to read another picture book review by Ronda.

 

 

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Picture Book Review – The Arabic Quilt by Aya Khalil

THE ARABIC QUILT:
An Immigrant Story

Written by Aya Khalil

Illustrated by Anait Semirdzhyan

(Tilbury House Publishers; $17.95, Ages 5-9)

 

 

 

Starred Review – School Library Journal

The Arabic Quilt, written by Aya Khalil with art by Anait Semirdzhyan, is a thoughtful picture book that sensitively conveys the experience and emotions of any child who has ever felt uncomfortable with or ashamed of a second language spoken, or other customs practiced and foods eaten, at home whether a recent immigrant or not. When my husband’s family moved to America from Israel in 1955 they chose to speak only English and, while I understand their motivation of wanting to fit in, it’s sad my husband never learned Hebrew, or Yiddish and German for that matter, all the languages of his parents.

The main character in this story is Kanzi whose family is newish to America, hence the sub-title. When she later introduces herself in class at her new school she says “I am Egyptian-American. I love to swim. I love to write poetry.” But also on her first day of third grade she deliberately leaves behind a kofta (meatball) sandwich so that her somewhat less typical meal wouldn’t stand out. Much to her dismay, Kanzi’s mother shows up at school with the forgotten lunch and embarrasses her daughter in front of classmates when calling her an affectionate name in Arabic. This part resonated with me even though I never had that exact experience. But who cannot relate to that awful feeling of being ‘the other’ in some situation during their school years whether it was from being teased for crying, being un-athletic, wearing glasses, or having an uncommon background?

The Arabic Quilt interior1
Interior spread from The Arabic Quilt: An Immigrant Story written by Aya Khalil and illustrated by Anait Semirdzhyan, Tilbury House ©2020.

 

The theme of Khalil’s story feels current and fresh. No one apologizes for their differences and should not have to. The Arabic Quilt honors Kanzi’s family’s history and language which is empowering, and no one does it better than Kanzi’s teacher. I love how Mrs. Haugen knows just what to say and do to comfort her upset student after being teased, “Oh Kanzi, being bilingual is beautiful.” In fact, the story not only features Arabic words throughout, but Khalil’s included a helpful glossary at the end.

Mrs. Haugen suggests Kanzi bring the handmade quilt into school and, following the positive response, announces a special project. Kanzi and her mother will write the students’ names in Arabic and then Kanzi’s classmates can design their own paper quilt pieces. Even the class across the hall is inspired by Mrs. Haugen’s project that celebrates Kanzi’s Arabic language. The book aptly ends with Kanzi composing a poem to her parents where she thanks her parents for encouraging her to be proud of her unique language and how, like the assorted pieces of her teita’s quilt, language can actually bring us together.

The Arabic Quit int2
Interior art from The Arabic Quilt: An Immigrant Story written by Aya Khalil and illustrated by Anait Semirdzhyan, Tilbury House ©2020.

 

One of my favorite Semirdzhyan illustrations depicts Kanzi writing poetry following her difficult first day while reassuringly wrapped in her cherished quilt from her teita (grandma) far away in Cairo. Another is the happy faces of the children admiring the finished paper quilt, the look of contentment on Mrs. Haugen’s face, and the pure joy on Kanzi’s face. The book’s art brings added warmth to this already meaningful story, and the ample white space allows the focus to be on the students, their interaction, and ultimately their own collage quilt that binds the kids in class together. Kanzi’s individual story is now woven into theirs, separate yet together. Between its important message of accepting differences, and being proud of one’s culture and language, The Arabic Quilt would make a welcome gift for Eid or for anyone eager to expand their child’s multicultural horizons. I recommend this lovely debut from Aya Khalil and hope you get a copy for yourself or for your child’s school from your local indie bookseller today.

  •Reviewed by Ronna Mandel

Click here for a classroom guide.

Also recommended for Eid is Once Upon an Eid: Stories of Hope and Joy by 15 Muslim Voices, edited by S. K. Ali and Aisha Saeed, with illustrations by Sara Alfageeh, Amulet Books.

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Picture Book Review – Just Like Me

JUST LIKE ME

Written and illustrated by Vanessa Brantley-Newton

(Knopf BFYR; $17.99, Ages 4-8)

 

Just Like Me cover

 

 

Beautifully written and illustrated by Vanessa Brantley-Newton, Just like Me is a book of poems honoring, encouraging, and shining a light on little girls everywhere.

The poems celebrate diversity, not only in terms of race and ethnicity, but in experience. Brantley-Newton welcomes all kinds of girls with differing hobbies, interests, likes, and dislikes. Girls can be an “Explorer,” a “Negotiator,” “Shy,” or just plain “Weird.” Each type of girl is recognized and validated.

Biblical principles weave throughout the poems. They call for making change in the world through kindness, grace, and “fight[ing] the good fight of love.” As “The Day I Decided to Become Sunshine,” “Warrior,” and “Girl Fight” emphasize, participating in this change is a willful decision girls can make. “I decided to be a light/ by holding a door/ open for others to come through.” “Respectfully/ with humanity/ and lovingly,” girls can empower the world by “fighting for … what [they] believe.”

 

Just Like Me interior
Interior spread from Just Like Me written and illustrated by Vanessa Brantley-Newton, Knopf BYR ©2020.

 

Just as important, girls can empower themselves. Poems such as “I Love My Body,” “Gumbo Me,” and  “My Crown” send positive body messages and celebrate the uniqueness of each girl. Each one is enough just for being herself.  ”[T]o be the me/that I’m supposed to be” is one of the most life-giving statements a little girl can hear.

Framing Brantley-Newton’s reassuring words are her captivating illustrations. Layers of pattern, color, and texture overlap to energize and uplift, placing each girl in center stage so that every reader can see herself in these pages.

This book is like a blanket of love. It would make a wonderful gift for that upcoming (virtual?) baby shower, birthday party, first day of school, or any occasion caregivers want to send a clear message of appreciation to the little girl in their life.

  •Reviewed by Armineh Manookian

 

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Kids Emotions – I’m Happy-Sad Today Author Lory Britain

AN ENLIGHTENING GUEST POST
ABOUT KIDS AND MOODS
WITH LORY BRITAIN, PhD

I’M HAPPY-SAD TODAY:
Making Sense of Mixed-Together Feelings
Written by Lory Britain, PhD
Illustrated by Matthew Rivera
(Free Spirit Publishing; $15.99, Ages 3-8)

 

cover art by Matthew Rivera from Im Happy Sad Today by Lory Britain PhD
Images from I’m Happy-Sad Today by Lory Britain © 2019. Used with permission of Free Spirit Publishing Inc., Minneapolis, MN; 1-800-735-7323; www.freespirit.com. All rights reserved.

 

“Grandma, I am so SA-MAD!”

 Oh … why, Momo?” I asked my 8-year-old granddaughter.

“I’m SAD that my parents won’t let me do what I want today and I am so MAD at them!” she replied passionately.

Thus began my journey to explore children’s complex feelings and to write I’m Happy-Sad Today: Making Sense of Mixed-Together Feelings. Most books and early childhood materials focus on children selecting one feeling that represents how they feel. Yet, “mixed-together” feelings are common in childhood and throughout adulthood. Exploring the emotional life of children through this lens enriches our understanding and support of children.

 

int spread by Matthew Rivera from Im Happy-Sad Today by Lory Britain
Images from I’m Happy-Sad Today by Lory Britain © 2019. Used with permission of Free Spirit Publishing Inc., Minneapolis, MN; 1-800-735-7323; www.freespirit.com. All rights reserved.

 

All children are faced with confusing, conflicted and ambivalent feelings during situations ranging from the “every day” such as their first sleepover to confusing and devastating situations involving abuse from a known adult. Often when children are struggling with coping skills, unrecognized mixed-together emotions are present. Children’s ability to understand both their own emotions and the emotions of others improves their inner emotional life, coping skills (self-regulation) and contributes to healthy relationships with those around them.

We can help children recognize all of their feelings, validate how they are feeling, and give them the lifelong tools to accept and express these feelings in developmentally appropriate ways.  And to quote my book, I’m Happy-Sad Today,  “When I’m older, sometimes I’ll still have different feelings mixed together inside of me. And that’s okay!”

 

back cover artwork by Matthew Rivera from Im Happy-Sad Today by Lory Britain
Images from I’m Happy-Sad Today by Lory Britain © 2019. Used with permission of Free Spirit Publishing Inc., Minneapolis, MN; 1-800-735-7323; www.freespirit.com. All rights reserved.

 

I’m grateful to Lory for sharing her insightful thoughts with us about children and their complex emotions. This important children’s book was just released yesterday so don’t miss your opportunity to learn more about I’m Happy-Sad Today: Making Sense of Mixed-Together Feelings by Lory Britain and illustrated by Matthew Rivera.  Visit https://www.freespirit.com/early-childhood/im-happy-sad-today-lory-britain-matthew-rivera for invaluable resources for adults, buying options, and a glimpse inside.

This guest post was written by Lory Britain, PhD
www.lorybritain.com

 

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Valuable Lessons of Self-Worth and Acceptance for Children by Jodi Mays

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We’re delighted to share the following enlightening guest post
by author Jodi Mays.

How do you teach a feeling or emotion? For some parents this is as difficult as asking what a color smells like, and yet kids today are bombarded with messages and imagery that does just that. From television, to magazines and social media, kids are picking up these impressions from an early age. So, how do you make sure the right messages are getting through to them? This was a question that plagued me when my son was young. How do I teach my son about emotions and self-esteem?

It was easy for me to say, “Treat others the way you want to be treated.” Or to remind him to be aware of others feelings but, as most parents may agree, it is not always what you say that imparts the best lessons. As a family, we have always been drawn to reading; turning to books to pass the time and getting lost in worlds both big and small. Reading became a way for us to tackle many of these tough ideas, which led to some incredible conversations about everything from self-esteem to compassion and kindness; conversations that may have been too difficult to broach on their own, without the help of books. It was these conversations that led me to write my first children’s book with the hope that I could pass along some of the same valuable lessons of self-worth and acceptance. After all, building a strong foundation of confidence and self-esteem is important for everyone and the basis that I hope will carry my child confidently into the future.

It is with this in mind that I want to share some of my favorite books on acceptance and self-esteem.

For Pre-Schoolers

The Sneetches by Dr. Seuss: You can’t really go wrong with this classic book. In The Sneetches, Dr Seuss weaves a story that teaches self-worth and acceptance, which is extremely fun to read. The Sneetches are born either with or without a star on their tummies, which leads an unscrupulous monkey to take advantage of their differences. In time the Sneetches learn to accept and embrace each other’s differences.

Spaghetti in a Hot Dog Bun by Maria Dismondy: In this book Lucy is the subject of ridicule for her favorite food, spaghetti in a hot dog bun. Lucy stands by her choice even when others are mean and mock her for being one-of-a-kind. When these same friends need help, Lucy has the courage to make the right choice. This story is truly empowering for any child who has ever felt different from the crowd.

For School Agers

Have You Filled A Bucket Today? by Carol McCloud: This book contains beautiful illustrations that pair easily with simple prose to help younger children learn how to be “bucket fillers.” It teaches children to show their appreciation with simple acts of kindness and love, which will not only boost the self-worth of those who get their buckets filled but also those who do the filling as well. It reminds children that a little kindness and acceptance can make the world a better place.

Unstoppable Me; 10 Ways to Soar Through Life by Dr. Wayne W. Dyer: This book builds on Dr. Dyer’s first book, Incredible You, and the ideas of “no limit thinking.” Kids are encouraged to embrace what makes them unique instead of simply trying to fit in. It embraces all of the wonderful quirks and qualities that every child is born with and teaches them to use these special traits to navigate stressful situations and enjoy life’s wonderful moments.

For Pre-Teens:

Freckle Juice by Judy Blume: No one defined a generation of young readers, struggling to navigate through life’s challenges better than Judy Blume. In her book Freckle Juice, she weaves the story of a young boy who simply wants to look different than he does. As young people sometimes do, he trusts the wrong person to help “fix” his problem with her secret recipe for freckles. This book is a classic for anyone who ever felt like they were missing a key feature to make them perfect.

Tween You and Me by Deb Dunham: Switching gears, Tween You and Me is a non-fiction book for tweens and parents living with tweens. It is a thoughtful and practical guide to navigating changing bodies, relationships and feelings in a way that encourages both self-expression and responsibility as well as lessons in respect for the young reader. Growing up is hard enough. Nurturing healthy self-esteem only adds to the challenge. Tween You and Me acts as a road map for the journey ahead.

For Young Adults:

The Creative Journal For Teens, Making Friends With Yourself by Lucia Capacchione: A combination of journal and how-to, this book offers teens a safe way to work through some of the complex challenges they face in everyday life. Written by a registered art therapist, this book can help teens to clarify their goals while strengthening their self-confidence by giving them a safe place to write down their feelings in a somewhat structured environment. For any teen that has difficulty expressing their emotions, this book can be a valuable tool.

The Skin I’m In by Sharon G Flake: This book is geared toward more mature, young adult readers and touches on race and class as well as self-esteem. It follows a young girl, Maleeka Madison, as she and her mother struggle with the death of her father. In her attempts to become more popular she finds herself the target of bullies. Throughout the story Maleeka has an internal battle to discover who she really is and who her real friends are. The Skin I’m In weaves a story about self-confidence, friendship and the consequences of trying too hard to fit in.

 

– By Jodi Mays

 

TheDayWeRodeTheRainbowJodi Mays is a free-lance writer. She divides her bi-coastal living between Malibu, CA and Longboat Key, FL. She moved with her family to Innsbruck, Austria with 5 English-German dictionaries and 15 duffle bags at a young age and still resides there at times throughout the year. She has one son with whom she traveled the world while he competed in International Junior Tennis Tournaments. She uses her colorful adventures as a modern-day gypsy as inspiration for her writing.
THE DAY WE RODE THE RAINBOW is the first book of an interactive and fun series called
‘The Book Series with a Purpose.’  She is a member of
the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators.

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