skip to Main Content

More Independence Day Reads

Some of the following books are not brand new releases, but noteworthy nonetheless as we think back this weekend to how our great nation came to be. Find out more about these interesting books at the pubisher’s websites or visit your local library or bookstore.

9781599903712-1Road To The Revolution (The Cartoon Chronicles of America) by Stan Mack and Susan Champlin – ($10.99, BloomsburyUSA, ages 10-14)

0763647039medFree? Stories About Human Rights AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL with a forward by Jacqueline Wilson – ($17.99, Candlewick Press, ages 10 and up)

63005171776: A New Look at Revolutionary Williamsburg by K.M. Kostyal with the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, photographs by Lori Epstein Renda – ($17.95, National Geographic Kids Books)

91899Unite or Die: How Thirteen States Became a Nation by Jacqueline Jules with illustrations by Jef Czekaj-  ($7.95, Charlesbridge, ages 5-9)

catalog_cover_100-1Imogene’s Last Stand by Candace Fleming with illustrations by Nancy Carpenter – ($16.99, Random House Children’s Books, ages 4-8)

Editor’s Note: Please check to make sure these books are in stock and that prices have not changed since original details were supplied to us. There may be copies available in remainders stores online if no longer available from the publishing house.

Share this:

Let’s Celebrate Independence Day! In 1776 by Jean Marzollo

IN 1776
Written by Jean Marzollo
Illustrated by Steve Björkman
(Scholastic; $ paperback prices vary, Ages 7-10)

 

 

In 1776, by Jean Marzollo and illustrated by Steve Björkman, while first published in 1994 by Scholastic, is still relevant today as we look forward to July 4th in 2017.

This paperback, part of the Scholastic Bookcase series, is a great book to bring out this holiday before all the BBQs and fireworks get started so youngsters can understand just exactly what it is we are celebrating. Told in easy to understand rhyme, “The colonists were angry, because they had no say, when the British king gave orders, three thousand miles away.” Kids will learn in simple language how, as colonists of Great Britain, Americans refused to be burdened with more taxes levied by King George III without representation. When the British marched on Lexington and Concord, fighting broke out. Soon the seeds of independence were sown, “So their leaders met in Philly, in June and in July. They picked some men to tell the king, “We must be free – here’s why!” The American Revolution or the War of Independence was bravely fought under the guidance of its leader, General George Washington and the rest as we say, is history.

“On the Fourth of July, in seventy-six, after a long and heated morn, The Declaration was approved, and the U.S.A. was born.”

Happy 4th of July everyone! 🇺🇸

  • Reviewed by Ronna Mandel
Share this:
Back To Top
%d bloggers like this: