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Picture Book Review – Barn in Winter

 

 

 

BARN IN WINTER:
SAFE AND WARM ON THE FARM

Written by Chambrae Griffith

Illustrated by Taia Morley

(Cottage Door Press; $9.99; Ages 1-4)

 

 

Barn in Winter cover barn as snow falls

 

 

From the publisher:

“Winter has come to the farm and covered everything in a blanket of icy snow. But where is the cow? Where are the pig and the goat? They are snuggly and snoozy, dozy and dreaming, tucked in all toasty, safe, dry and warm inside the cozy barn. Celebrate winter with this beautiful keepsake book that any farm-loving toddler is sure to love!”

 

Review:

Chambrae Griffith and Taia Morely deliver Barn in Winter, a gorgeous book introducing preschoolers to a farm in winter and its personified barn. With adorable farm animals filling the pages, this sturdy board book is sure to charm little ones.

 

Barn in Winter int1 barn feels a chill
Interior spread from Barn in Winter written by Chambrae Griffith and illustrated by Taia Morely, Cottage Door Press ©2023.

 

Griffith’s rhyming text feels hushed and snuggly—almost reverent—like the quiet that comes before a storm. Morely’s art is the perfect complement, with warm, saturated colors and a blanket-like texture that begs to be printed and hung on a nursery room wall.

 

 

Barn in Winter int2 out of the storm cuddly and cozy cow
Interior art from Barn in Winter written by Chambrae Griffith and illustrated by Taia Morely, Cottage Door Press ©2023.

 

A perfect read-aloud before a long winter’s nap. Barn in Spring will be available in spring 2024

  • Reviewed by Roxanne Troup

 

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Picture Book Review – Since the Baby Came

SINCE THE BABY CAME:
A Sibling’s Learning-to-Love Story in 16 Poems

Written by Kathleen Long Bostrom

Illustrated by Janet Samuel

(WaterBrook; $12.99, Ages 3-7)

 

Since the Baby Came cover sibling and baby and gear piled on parents

 

The variety of the 16 thoughtfully crafted poems in Since the Baby Came written by Kathleen Long Bostrom coupled with the adorable, soft-focus illustrations by Janet Samuel merits multiple reads. If a new sibling is coming into your life, or maybe a relative or friend’s life, this book delivers!

It begins with “Surprise,” a seemingly simple, yet emotionally-packed three-line Haiku poem called a Senryu – “Surprise!” Mama says./”We are having a baby!”/Nobody asked me. And the poems continue to deliver page after page. My favorite things about Since the Baby Came is the inclusivity of the biracial main characters, and the natural trajectory the story takes as the soon-to-be older sister and then actual older sister confronts her emotions. The ups and downs portrayed feel genuine, something young readers in the same or similar boat will relate to. In “Mama is Having a Baby” the little girl notes how her toys are pushed aside to make room for the crib. She also points out, “Nobody says when he’s coming./And nobody wants to say how.”

 

Since the Baby Came int art1 When Will This Baby Go Away
Interior spread from Since the Baby Came written by Kathleen Long Bostrom and illustrated by Janet Samuel, WaterBrook ©2023.

 

The balanced blend of seriousness and humor also kept me engaged. In “Look at Me!” the child insists she’s fun to be with when the grownups are devoting all their time to “oohing” and “ahhing” at her baby brother. The cute family dog, who appears in many spreads, is sporting snazzy sunglasses in the poem. Parents can suggest their children look out for the dog as they follow along. And “Diaper Volcano” is a poop-centric poem about, you guessed it, baby bro’s overflowing diapers. It’s hilarious, unapologetic, and will crack kids up. “Suppertime” is a funny limerick, a type of poem I’ve always adored, about the baby’s unbecoming mealtime behavior. I could rave about all the other poems, but you really need to read these on your own to find your faves!

 

Interior spread from Since the Baby Came written by Kathleen Long Bostrom and illustrated by Janet Samuel, WaterBrook ©2023.

 

As the little girl’s moods ebb and flow, she experiences anger, fascination, remorse, discovery, and ultimately love, all while readers watch Baby Brother grow along with his sister’s sentiment. Sister’s emotional growth is a rewarding highlight.

A sweet “Surprise – Part 2” bookends this charming story that’s easy to read aloud and return to again and again. WaterBrook is a publisher committed to uplifting Christian voices but this book does not feel overly religious at all. G-d is mentioned several times in meaningful ways and one poem mentions Jesus. Since the Baby Came is an easy book to recommend. It exudes warmth and thoughtfulness and will no doubt encourage conversations on the subject with new older siblings. Two pages of backmatter in the 40-page picture book explain the types of poems used, making it useful for the classroom as well as at home.

Download comprehensive parent resources here.

  • Reviewed by Ronna Mandel
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Picture Book Review – The Snowman Waltz

 

THE SNOWMAN WALTZ

Written by Karen Konnerth

Illustrated by Emily Neilson

(Sleeping Bear Press; $17.99, Ages 4-8)

 

 

The Snowman Waltz cover snowmen waltzing on frozen river

 

Cold and snowy weather may wreak havoc across the U.S., but The Snowman Waltz written by Karen Konnerth and illustrated by Emily Neilson makes good use of such frosty conditions. Set against a beautiful backdrop of a winter woodland glen, this picture book invites young readers to glide across their own floors and follow in the footsteps of the snowmen and penguin characters.

 

The Snowman Waltz int1 snowmen dancing in top hats
Interior spread from The Snowman Waltz written by Karen Konnerth and illustrated by Emily Neilson, Sleeping Bear Press ©2022.

 

Konnerth has created a friendly battle of the beats in that a jovial snowman community’s waltzing activity is described in a 1, 2, 3 rhythm until they are surprised by penguins whose marching movements are then written in a 1,2, 3, 4 beat. I loved this idea! I eagerly turned the pages to see how the two different groups and dance patterns, not to mention the text, would come together.

While clearly no ill will was intended, the penguins did barge in on the snowmen’s ball. The chaos that ensued is one of my favorite spreads. Under the starlit sky, we see a profusion of confusion as white and black and white bodies are tossed about!

 

The Snowman Waltz int2 snowmen and penguins shout and fall
Interior spread from The Snowman Waltz written by Karen Konnerth and illustrated by Emily Neilson, Sleeping Bear Press ©2022.

 

While at first, it seemed that penguins and snowmen got pretty badly bent out of shape, the chaos soon turned into a solution as the youngest of the penguins and the youngest of the snowmen gravitated to each other. Then they demonstrated a smart new approach. Working together!

 

The Snowman Waltz int3 snowmen and penguins dancing together
Interior spread from The Snowman Waltz written by Karen Konnerth and illustrated by Emily Neilson, Sleeping Bear Press ©2022.

 

Before long a line forms, greetings take place, and then magically … Back and forth they bump and waddle./Having fun they slip and slide./Then the snowmen show the penguins/Something that they never tried.

The rhyme is delightful and, motivated by Neilson’s visually appealing illustrations—icy cold never looked so good, I could easily have taken the book in hand as my partner and twirled across my kitchen floor! So it’s no surprise that  backmatter includes sheet music and a finger dance activity. This charming tale of cooperation would make a great story time selection and conversation starter.

  • Reviewed by Ronna Mandel

 

Stay in a winter mood with this snowflake-themed picture book.

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Children’s Picture Book Review – The Winter Bird

 

THE WINTER BIRD

Written by Kate Banks

Illustrated by Suzie Mason

(Candlewick Press; $18.99, Ages 3-7)

 

 

The Winter Bird cover

 

 

Written by Kate Banks and illustrated by Suzie Mason, The Winter Bird is a comforting and heartwarming story of friendship and perseverance, helping readers discover the quiet strength of patience and hope. 

During the time of year “when the sun [goes] to bed early,” brown bear and hedgehog prepare for their annual winter routines. Nestled in a thicket and nursing a broken wing, the nightingale watches the geese, starlings, and swallows fly away. “‘What will happen to me?’” the nightingale asks. As a spring bird, it “‘knows nothing of winter.’” 

 

The Winter Bird int1 injured nightingale watches geese fly
THE WINTER BIRD. Text Copyright © 2022 Kate Banks. Illustrations Copyright © 2022 by Suzie Mason. Reproduced by permission of the publisher, Candlewick Press, Somerville, MA.

 

“‘You will learn … You will learn,’” hoots the owl who, along with other friendly animals like the rabbit and gray squirrel, provide food and shelter, helping the nightingale survive its new icy surroundings. 

Adapting to the slow, winter rhythm of nesting, waiting, and wondering, the nightingale learns the beauty in both the harshness and brilliance of the season. In lovely, lyrical language, we watch the landscape change as “the cold cre[eps] in on icy feet” and “the waltz of winter” begins. Beautiful illustrations in soft browns and grays, rounded edges, and spots of bright color let readers know:  though the storm is coming, all will be well.

 

 

The Winter Bird int2 forest animals in snow
THE WINTER BIRD. Text Copyright © 2022 Kate Banks. Illustrations Copyright © 2022 by Suzie Mason. Reproduced by permission of the publisher, Candlewick Press, Somerville, MA.

 

Throughout it all, the nightingale does what it knows how to do–sing. Whether singing of “winter’s woes” or “winter’s wonders,” it brings comfort to both itself and the other animals around it. A spring bird, the nightingale patiently learns how to “become a winter bird, too.” 

A soothing picture book for bedtime or quiet time, The Winter Bird invites readers to bundle up, settle in, and enjoy the wonder of winter.  

  • Reviewed by Armineh Manookian

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Picture Book Review by Ronda Einbinder – The Smallest Snowflake

 

 

THE SMALLEST SNOWFLAKE

Written and illustrated by Bernadette Watts

(NorthSouth Books; $17.95, Ages 4-8)

 

 

 

English author and illustrator Bernadette Watts brings her inspiration for nature into The Smallest Snowflake, a heartfelt story about a little snowflake who journeys to earth with the other snowflakes while holding her dreams quietly in her heart.

Watts’ writing brings life to the small pieces of ice each sharing their excitement about their winter voyage. Flowing from the clouds, they see “fields and the orchards, the red roofs of farms, and the lovely city standing at the end of the glacial lake.” The verses read as human characters with each snowflake declaring where they wish to travel. The snowflakes feel relatable as if they are people sharing their dreams.

 

The Smallest Snowflake int1 looking up at snowflakes
Interior spread from The Smallest Snowflake written and illustrated by Bernadette Watts, NorthSouth Books ©2022.

 

Watts empowers the snowflakes with personalities that flow through the story like beloved friends. We meet a snowflake who chooses to travel to a different land and settle on a tree branch, and another snowflake wishing to “watch the caribou and bear, the lynx and raccoon, and even the red squirrel who sleeps in that very tree.” The soft palette of brown, green, and orange are spread across two pages with a bear gazing at the tiny animals gathered on the tree. A blue sky covers another page overlooking the sea. It’s beautifully sprinkled with white snow flowing over the battlement of castle walls.

Each page turn takes the reader to a new location. The snowflakes flow from jeweled domes to the golden pinnacles of St. Basil’s Cathedral, while people are huddled together in the streets trying to stay warm from the frost. Many of the snowflakes keep traveling on.

“The littlest snowflake did not have such a wide education as the others and knew very little about the world.” Watts’ white mountains are topped with snowflakes and birds flying through the pages. “I just want to be warm.”

 

The Smallest Snowflake int2 snowflakes less in number
Interior illustrations from The Smallest Snowflake written and illustrated by Bernadette Watts, NorthSouth Books ©2022.

 

It isn’t often that you think of a snowflake as wanting to be warm, but this earnest piece of snow is determined to find its place. When most of the snowflakes come to rest, the littlest snowflake continues to travel. She eventually lands on a windowsill and finds a home in a window box filled with earth outside a tiny cottage. It was here the little snowflake took her place.

The little snowflake sees the burning logs and a kettle standing on the hearth. The home is warm and friendly. Watts’ words and drawings fill this story with joy and comfort, whether reading beside a crackling fireplace or tucked warmly in a bed. The yellow sun and blue sky are drawn on the final page as spring nears. The closing words read, “loved filled her heart with such warmth that she melted away with joy.” A perfect sentence to end with. This is a lovely read teaching kids to follow their destiny, even if their destiny is different from others.

  • Reviewed by Ronda Einbinder

 

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Six Kids Books for National Poetry Month

CELEBRATE NATIONAL POETRY MONTH

WITH THESE GREAT KIDS BOOKS

 

 

 

TheBonYourThumb coverTHE B ON YOUR THUMB:
60 Poems to Boost Reading and Spelling
Written by Colette Hiller
Illustrated by Tor Freeman
(Frances Lincoln Children’s Books; $19.99, Ages 3-8)

The title and cover pulled me in and I could not wait to read this hilarious poetry book meant for children and parent, caregiver or any adult to experience together. It’s done so well that kids will laugh while learning some unusual things about the English language that grown-ups may now take for granted. “The illustrated rhymes and delightful ditties” will definitely boost early reading “as each poem teaches a specific sound, spelling, or rule.” There is clever wordplay and just so much to enjoy. I found it hard to narrow down the poems that I wanted to share here, but I’ll try with this one about sounds.

 

The Man in the Moon
The Man in the moon
dropped into our school,
just yesterday morning
round about noon.
You may not believe me
but I have the proof:
there’s a man-in-the_moon
shaped hole in the roof!

 

Some poems in the section on silent letters that I loved include The K on Your Knee, Answer This, Why is That?, A Secret Number, and Christmas at the Castle. In the spellings sections, I’m sure kids will LOL at A Clue, Separate, and A Lot. And in the homophones section, Two, Too, and To is a great one to share as is Which Witch, and A Whole Donut. Especially helpful is the backmatter with exercises and activities to do with children. Tor Freeman’s personified letters and cheerful art bring the poems to life with their quirky charm and vibrant colors. As adults we may have forgotten how hard the peculiarities of our English language are for youngsters to grasp. This book makes it not only educational and entertaining but utterly irresistible! 

 

Catch the Sky coverCATCH THE SKY:
Playful Poems on the Air We Share
Written by Robert Heidbreder
Illustrated by Emily Dove
(Greystone Kids; $17.95, Ages 3-8)

All around the world, one thing there’s no denying, is we all can look up and see the moon in the night’s sky because, in addition to sharing the air we breathe, we also share the sky and all its treasures. Heidbreder captures the marvel of nature and more in bite-sized poems filling 40 pages of pure delight. In his opening poem, Catch The Sky he writes

Look up! Gaze round!
Cast eyes to air.
Catch the sky
that we all share.

Two-page spreads with poems on opposite pages cleverly take readers around the world to meet diverse characters finding so much wonder everywhere. Whether that’s a squirrel walking a power line or crows heading for home in the evening, there’s always something to enjoy with every page turn. One particular spread I like is a city buildings scape with the first poem showing people on rooftops flying kites. In the foreground of the same spread is a birthday celebration and the poem is about balloons. With the story moving from sunrise throughout the day to nightfall, Catch the Sky can also be an ideal bedtime read that, with the lovely and calming art, should inspire beautiful and sweet dreams.

 

A Poem is a Firefly cvrA POEM IS A FIREFLY
Written by Charles Ghigna
Illustrated by Michelle Hazelwood Hyde
(Schiffer Kids; $16.99, Ages 5-8)

This gentle introduction to poetry is a rhyming tale that tips its hat to nature when describing all the things a poem can be. What perfect inspiration for the littlest poets in your family! A bear and his forest friends share their impressions about what makes a poem which teachers can use as a jumping-off point for creative writing prompts.

A poem is a wild rose,
a promise just begun,
a blossom new
with fragrant dew
unfurling in the sun.

Even without the vibrant art, Ghigna’s words are easy to imagine. Yet Hyde’s illustrations are not only cheerful and packed with adorable animals—the moose is my fave—they’re lush with a jewel-toned palette that complements the rich colors of all the animals. Kids will love how poems can be found everywhere, from a laugh to a sigh or in the stars in the sky. Talk about poetry at your fingertips! 

 

This Poem is a Nest coverTHIS POEM IS A NEST
Written by Irene Latham
Illustrated by Johanna Wright
(Wordsong; $17.99, Ages 7 and up)

A Kirkus Reviews Best Book
An NCTE Notable Poetry Book

I have never read a poetry book quite like This Poem is a Nest. Its brilliance will stay with you long after you’ve finished your first reading. I want to emphasize first because you will want to return to it again and again, especially as your moods change. I could not put it down, eager to see how Latham would take her original 37-line, four-part poem, “Nest,” then create what she calls nestlings, 161 smaller poems within it on topics as broad as the seasons, space, the alphabet, relationships and emotions. I read in awe how she took the nest concept and then soared. It begins in 1. Spring 

This poem has twigs in it, and little bits of feather-fluff.
It’s got wings and birdsong stitched together with ribbons of hope. 

Consider this book a key to an alchemist’s lab. It will take children to magical places they have never imagined words could take them, places where they will definitely create gold. Using the concepts of found poems or blackout poetry that Latham explains in the beginning of the book, she makes it all look so easy. But clearly it was not effortless. It obviously takes patience and commitment. This Poem is a Nest resonated with me because I could feel the love and devotion she put into each and every nestling. Latham includes tips in her conclusion to set readers off to find their own nests of inspiration. Wright’s simple black and white spot art is a treat, full of children dreaming, birds flying, and animals playing. I’ll leave you with this beautiful one called Parent Poem: this poem has endless faith in you. ENJOY!

ICE!PoemsAboutPolarLife cvrICE! POEMS ABOUT POLAR LIFE
Written and illustrated by Douglas Florian
(Holiday House; $17.99, Ages 7-10)

Kirkus Reviews Best Book of the Year

Author-illustrator Douglas Florian deftly tackles those two remote places on our planet known as the Arctic and Antarctica in the most whimsical and unexpected ways in his poetry and art. At the same time he adds important factual information below each poem making this a must-read picture book. In other words, kids can come for the verse, but they’ll stay for the info since there is so much to learn, especially since these areas and their flora and fauna are threatened by climate change. There are 21 poems ranging from those about animals such as the polar bear, blue whale, the Arctic hare, and musk ox to ones about the polar regions, the tundra and climate change. Florian’s included clever wordplay and makes every poem a joy to read aloud especially the one about a ptimid bird called the Ptarmigan whose home is the rocky tundra. I pfound this one about krill especially pfunny:

Fish and penguins, squids and seals,
all find krill make splendid meals.
Blue whales eat krill by the millions:
Millions! Billions! Trillions! Krillions!

Describing his original artwork, The Poetry Foundation said, “Florian’s illustrated poetry books for children often incorporate elements of collage, watercolor, and gouache on a surface of primed paper bags.” Kids will find the humor in the art pairs perfectly with the characteristics of the animals presented whether it’s the Arctic Hare toting an umbrella on a bad hare day or with the menace to small creatures, the very TALONted Snowy Owl. Backmatter includes info about Florian, his interest in natural science, and his engaging art style.

 

Spiku coverSPI-KU:
A Clutter of Short Verse on Eight Legs

Written by Leslie Bulion
Illustrated by Robert Meganck
(Peachtree Publishing; $16.99, Ages 8-12)

Starred Review – Kirkus

If you have a child that loves to learn while enjoying all different kinds of poems, Spi-Ku is the book for you to share with them. As wonderful as the poems are, so too is the variety of factual information included.

Middle-grade readers quickly learn that “all spiders are arachnids, but some arachnids mite not be spiders.” I always thought a daddy long legs was a spider, but it’s not. I also had no idea that a mite and a tick are part of the arachnid family. For some reason, I thought spiders have antennae but they don’t. What they do have are two main body regions and are “the only arachnids that have a narrow waist called a pedicel connecting the two main body parts.” How closely do you look at spiders? I honestly don’t take the time. At home, when I see a spider, I usually grab a plastic container to catch them and set them free outside.

Bulion breaks down different aspects of spiders. In Spiders on the Move this funny poem says it all.

 

Fishing Spider
Row, row, row my legs,
Pairs two and three are oars,
My first legs feel the way ahead,
Which do no work? My fours!

One of my favorite sections details in poems and prose how clever spiders are. Masters of disguise and creating ploys to catch their prey, these eight-legged creatures are not to be underestimated. There are sections on Spider Mamas, Spider Enemies and topics you might not ever have considered when thinking about spiders such as senses or their interesting courting rituals.

The plethora of poems are presented alongside descriptive paragraphs, and illustrations that are both whimsical, and scientifically accurate. Each one is so distinct and full of character. I applaud Meganck for not creeping me out with his spider art, and I think even mild arachnophobes will likely agree. Readers will find limericks, concrete poems, haiku, free verse, cinquains throughout the book with explanations about these and other poetic forms used in the comprehensive backmatter. Teachers can take advantage of the glossary of common and scientific names, a relative size chart, and more. Here’s a link to a teacher’s guide.

 

 

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Picture Book Review – In The Woods

IN THE WOODS

Written by David Elliott

Illustrated by Rob Dunlavey

(Candlewick Press; $17.99, Ages 3-7)

 

In The Woods cover

 

Starred Reviews – Booklist, Horn, Kirkus

 

New York Times best-selling author David Elliott’s latest picture book feels like a classic. In the Woods spotlights fourteen woodland animals, capturing their essence in verse. I appreciate the inclusion of favorites such as the bear, fox, and raccoon but even more so the animals we may not know much about. My favorite of these outliers was the fisher cat: “Does not like fish. / Is not a cat. / I don’t know what / to make of that. / But when you are / as fierce as she, / there’s no need for /consistency.” This seeming puzzle is explained in the back matter where relevant and interesting facts elaborate on the poems. For example, it takes five to six sprays to deplete a skunk’s scent, then about ten days to produce a new batch.

 

In The Woods int1
IN THE WOODS. Text copyright © 2020 by David Elliott. Illustrations copyright © 2020 by Rob Dunlavey. Reproduced by permission of the publisher, Candlewick Press, Somerville, MA.

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The poems are easy to approach for young readers, using simple ideas plus humor. Kids may be surprised a poem can be two words. “The Moose”: “Ungainly, / mainly.” Or that the words in poems can be manipulated, adding to their depth. The millipede poem has a blank space running down the middle; some words are broken to create effect. As kids in this book’s age range are beginning to learn about verse in school and tasked with writing some themselves, Elliott’s poems introduce poetry in a fun, playful manner.

 

In The Woods int2
IN THE WOODS. Text copyright © 2020 by David Elliott. Illustrations copyright © 2020 by Rob Dunlavey. Reproduced by permission of the publisher, Candlewick Press, Somerville, MA.

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Rob Dunlavey’s accompanying art, done in watercolor and mixed media, adds another level to each glimpse. Echoing the woodland theme, the pictures speak of nature yet cleverly placed highlights or splashes of color guide your eye to what’s important: the flight of the scarlet tanager, the inquisitive muzzle of a raccoon, or the dangerous headlights that will just miss the porcupine crossing the road. The illustrations are big, memorable, and beautiful.

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  • Click here to order a copy of In The Woods.
    e
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  • Recommended Reads for the Week of 11/2/20

 

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Picture Book Review – Just Like Me

JUST LIKE ME

Written and illustrated by Vanessa Brantley-Newton

(Knopf BFYR; $17.99, Ages 4-8)

 

Just Like Me cover

 

 

Beautifully written and illustrated by Vanessa Brantley-Newton, Just like Me is a book of poems honoring, encouraging, and shining a light on little girls everywhere.

The poems celebrate diversity, not only in terms of race and ethnicity, but in experience. Brantley-Newton welcomes all kinds of girls with differing hobbies, interests, likes, and dislikes. Girls can be an “Explorer,” a “Negotiator,” “Shy,” or just plain “Weird.” Each type of girl is recognized and validated.

Biblical principles weave throughout the poems. They call for making change in the world through kindness, grace, and “fight[ing] the good fight of love.” As “The Day I Decided to Become Sunshine,” “Warrior,” and “Girl Fight” emphasize, participating in this change is a willful decision girls can make. “I decided to be a light/ by holding a door/ open for others to come through.” “Respectfully/ with humanity/ and lovingly,” girls can empower the world by “fighting for … what [they] believe.”

 

Just Like Me interior
Interior spread from Just Like Me written and illustrated by Vanessa Brantley-Newton, Knopf BYR ©2020.

 

Just as important, girls can empower themselves. Poems such as “I Love My Body,” “Gumbo Me,” and  “My Crown” send positive body messages and celebrate the uniqueness of each girl. Each one is enough just for being herself.  ”[T]o be the me/that I’m supposed to be” is one of the most life-giving statements a little girl can hear.

Framing Brantley-Newton’s reassuring words are her captivating illustrations. Layers of pattern, color, and texture overlap to energize and uplift, placing each girl in center stage so that every reader can see herself in these pages.

This book is like a blanket of love. It would make a wonderful gift for that upcoming (virtual?) baby shower, birthday party, first day of school, or any occasion caregivers want to send a clear message of appreciation to the little girl in their life.

  •Reviewed by Armineh Manookian

 

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Kids Picture Book Review – Snowy Farm

SNOWY FARM

Written by Calvin Shaw

Illustrated by Oamul Lu

(Paula Wiseman Books; $17.99; Ages 4-8)

 

Snowy Farm cover

 

It may be April, but some parts of the country are blanketed in snow. While those places eagerly await spring’s arrival, we thought we’d share a story about the magic of snow.

 

Bundled-up horses and bundled-up hens living on water more than living on land in Snowy Farm, written by author and songwriter Calvin Shaw with illustrations by Oamul Lu, takes the reader on a family’s lyrical journey one day on their farm.

The story opens with snow-capped mountains and frost covered trees as a lone wind mill sits behind the frosty old house. “There’s a snowy white windmill on a snowy white farm, with a frosty old house and a snow-covered barn.” Lu paints a tall farmer with only eyes and a mustache shown on his face as he’s bundled from the top of his head to the bottom of his feet in warm clothing. Standing beside him is his sweet faced horse with red ear muffs and a scarf protecting him from the harsh winter. And his friend the hen has matching red ear muffs!

 

 

snowy farm int
Interior spread from Snowy Farm written by Calvin Shaw and illustrated by Oamul Lu, Paula Wiseman Books ©2019.

 

 

Turning the page, we are introduced to two children with smiles on their faces. “They’re living on ice with no grass at hand. They’re living on water more than living on land.” Shaw introduces us to life on an icy farm. The children help their father pick the apples, but they also take time to make snow angels with the chickens and goats. Lu outlines angels underneath the boy, chicken and goat and the cold doesn’t seem to bother any of them.

The traditional roles are kept as mom is cooking while “outside of her window, her kids work the field. The chickens are fed and the apples are peeled.” When dinner is ready the family runs inside and Lu paints warm colors of  a family gathering together on a cold winter night. This is a sweet story of a close knit family that work and spend time together talking about their day by the fire. When the day comes to an end “with the starlight appearing, they’re warm and at ease, while falling asleep to a cold winter breeze.” The page turns to dark and the stars are seen in the night. We know the family is peaceful and happy on the farm.

In the Author’s Note, Shaw explains how Antarctica is the coldest place on earth. He tells the reader about the peak summer months and gives a lesson on how daylight lasts for twenty-four hours. This is a great family bedtime story that teaches kids who live in a snowy part of the world, and teaches those who have never experienced snow. Shaw himself has never traveled to Antarctica, but is able to give the reader great insight and, as he says, until we visit, this book can be our imagined journey there together. I imagined that journey, too, and maybe one day I’ll visit Antarctica, but until then I have Snowy Farm to read and re-read.

• Reviewed by Ronda Einbinder

Click here to read a review of another snow-themed picture book.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Kids Book Reviews – Christmas Board Books Roundup 2019

CHRISTMAS BOARD BOOKS

– A Roundup –

 

Merry Christmas Transparent Clip Art

 

 

christmas puppy book coverCHRISTMAS PUPPY:
A Wag My Tail Book
By Salina Yoon
(Little Simon; $7.99, All Ages)

The 12-page, pull-the-tab board book, Christmas Puppy, begs to be read and enjoyed by parents and youngsters alike. Who can resist a furry tail that either parents or children can pull each time there’s a puppy pal sound effect?

Puppy knows there’s a gift waiting for him under the tree, but which one will it be? Each time he thinks he’s found it, that particular present is actually intended for either Mouse, Hamster or Cat. Readers can imitate the accompanying animal squeaks, chirps and meows while pulling the wagging tail tab to their hearts’ content. Yoon’s sweet story with its four adorable animals concludes with Puppy finding and unwrapping his special gift. Have fun with Puppy and friends and enjoy a wag-ful Christmas.

grandmas christmas wish coverGRANDMA’S CHRISTMAS WISH
Written by Helen Foster James
Illustrated by Petra Brown
(Sleeping Bear Press; $8.99, Ages 0-4)

Now available in board book, Grandma’s Christmas Wish celebrates the unique bond between a grandmother bunny and her grandbunny. It’s a gentle reminder that multi-generational relationships mean so much and can bring such joy.

I love how this grandma bunny expresses herself so beautifully in her rhyming couplets. As the pair frolic in the burrow and the snow covered woods, Grandma shares her wishes which are so much more than material ones. Instead they’re about spending time together and her feeling of unconditional love for her grandbunny. “But, you with your grin and all of your charms, you’re my best present, just wrapped in my arms.” Be prepared to smile with every lovely page turn in this heartwarming story just perfect for any little one’s first Christmas.

christmas is awesome coverCHRISTMAS IS AWESOME!
A Hello!Lucky Book

Written by Sabrina Moyle
Illustrated by Eunice Moyle
(Abrams Appleseed; $7.99, Ages 0-3)

The merry, colorful illustrations and simple rhyming text of Christmas is Awesome! convey exactly what children think of when describing Christmas. “… Twinkling Lights, Silent Nights, Busy Elves, Jingle Bells!” Joy jumps off every page of this charming new board book from the sisters who founded Hello!Lucky, “the award-winning letterpress greeting card and design studio committed to using creativity to spread joy, fun, and kindness.” They succeed.

In addition to the festive feel of this 24-page board book, there are many laughs in store. Inside readers will find humorous spreads—I’m partial to the “Ugly Sweaters” one—that are study-worthy to see what surprises have been included. For example, a lump of coal gets up to all sorts of antics and experiences all sorts of emotions in every spread. I discovered new things with every read and children will enjoy doing the same. Kids will love the variety of animals featured throughout the book such as an elephant, a mole, a penguin, a cat, a squirrel, a dog, a mouse and lots more. Easy to memorize, this terrific read-aloud is recommended for little ones who like the fun and funny side of Christmas.

santas cookie is missing cvrSANTA’S COOKIE IS MISSING!
Written by Chris Ayala-Kronos
Illustrated by Anne Passchier
(HMH Books; $8.99, Ages 0-3)

Die-cut board books are always popular with toddlers and Santa’s Cookie is Missing! is no exception. I like the premise of this story; after a family’s Christmas Even dinner has ended, the narrator (a young girl) notices that the cookie usually saved for Santa has disappeared. The child sets off to solve the mystery first at home, then outdoors, and then inside again.

Every new die-cut reveals something related to the narrator’s search in a circle shape that will hopefully lead to the missing snack. Whether it’s a plate, a Christmas tree ornament, a snowball, the hollow of an old oak tree or even a mug of hot cocoa, there are lots of places to look and several possible suspects. Make note of the cat and dog in the artwork and see if your kids can anticipate who might be the culprit. I’ll admit I was surprised, but maybe that’s because I was too busy checking out all the pretty die-cuts. The tree-ornament and the present with their respective sparkly and shiny designs were my faves. What will be your youngsters’ faves? Don’t miss picking up a copy of this book to gift or to enjoy at home.

The little winter book of gnomes cvrTHE LITTLE WINTER BOOK OF GNOMES
By Kirsten Sevig
(The Countryman Press; $12.95; All Ages)

This compact book (not really a board book, but the same size) makes a wonderful gift to bring to family and friends for the holiday season. It’s packed with playful gnomes in watercolor illustrations coupled with proverbs inspired by author illustrator Sevig’s Norwegian family and her childhood. Though raised in America, Sevig explains that she and her sister were brought up “in the only Norwegian speaking household on the block.” Clearly her fond memories have influenced the warm upbeat tone of this collection.

Early on, Sevig points out how the meaning of the word gnome actually has a double meaning that’s depicted in every illustration. Not only is a gnome a small woodland creature, it’s also a “wise, pithy saying” and The Little Winter Book of Gnomes is filled with them. I knew the majority of the sayings, but the way they’re lovingly paired with assorted gnomes is the true pleasure that’s to be taken away from any reading. Read just several at a time or sit back, have a cup of warm tea and delight in all 128 cheerful pages. Some noteworthy gnomes include “A tree with strong roots laughs at the storm,” “A warm drink is a hug in a mug,” and “Don’t waste time looking back. You aren’t going that way.” Marzipan and Rice Cream with Berry Sauce are just a few of the recipes that are also included, making this book a go-to read when the weather turns cold and party plans get underway.

  • Reviewed by Ronna Mandel

Have you read IF ANIMALS CELEBRATED CHRISTMAS by Ann Whitford Paul?
Illustrated by David Walker, Paul’s book is now out in board book format.
Read my review of the picture book from last year here.

Looking for more Christmas book reviews? Click here.

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Kids Book Reviews – Five Holiday Picture Books 2019

 

WINTER HOLIDAY PICTURE BOOKS 2019

∼A ROUNDUP∼

happy holidays clip art

 

vegetables in holiday underwear coverVEGETABLES IN HOLIDAY UNDERWEAR
Written and illustrated by Jared Chapman
(Abrams Appleseed; $14.99, ages 3-7)

Vegetables in Holiday Underwear is a laugh-out-of-your-undies classroom (or anywhere) read-aloud! Our little narrator Pea explains to a skeptical Broccoli in pants that there’s all kinds of underwear, and underwear is for everyone. I was thrilled when my students wanted to dissect each page, ever eager to discuss each type of veggie sporting colorful, fancy, and silly underpants. This story also manages to invoke the holiday spirit about giving to others. Even baby vegetables can have underwear as gifts, although they may not quite be ready to wear them yet. The details in Chapman’s vibrant artwork and the expressions on each lovingly crafted vegetable are a delight for all.

 

one wild christmas book coverONE WILD CHRISTMAS (Life in the Wild series)
Written and illustrated by Nicholas Oldland
(Kids Can Press; $16.99, ages 4-8)

Bear, Moose and Beaver love nothing more than Christmas, and their favorite part about it is decorating of course. The cartoon-like style of the illustrations adds to the fun and excitement with every page turn. Filled with festive ideas, Bear, Moose and Beaver busily prepare their home with lights, stockings, presents and more. In all of the hullabaloo, the three friends realize they don’t have a Christmas tree! In One Wild Christmas, Beaver and Moose dash out into the night with Bear close behind. When they all agree on just the right tree, things take an unexpected turn, and it’s up to Bear to save the day. Don’t miss this beautiful twist on trimming a Christmas tree.

 

peanut butter and santa claus coverPEANUT BUTTER & SANTA CLAUS:
A ZOMBIE CULINARY TALE

Written by Joe McGee
Illustrated by Charles Santoso
(Abrams BYR; $16.99, ages 3-7)

What do peanut butter and Santa Claus have in common? That was my first thought too, and after reading this story I now find that they pair up perfectly. In Peanut Butter & Santa Claus, this jam-packed, exploding with pictures book, we follow Abigail Zink (a human), Reginald (her zombie friend) and and her pal Zarfon, a peanut butter loving space alien. The style of illustrations and words conjured up “Calvin and Hobbes” comics from my youth, while we journey along with the story’s heroes, Abigail, Reginald and Zarfon. They set out to discover why their town mayor has declared, “Christmas is canceled!” The three clever friends discover that Santa is, quite literally, stuck at the North Pole and it will take some brains, ingenuity and gooey luck to save Christmas!

snow globe wishes book coverSNOW GLOBE WISHES
Written by Erin Dealey
Illustrated by Claire Shorrock
(Sleeping Bear Press; $16.99, ages 4-8)

There is a reason snow globes are a cherished gift around the world. Lift a snow globe up, give a little shake, watch the snow fall and all of a sudden you are momentarily transported from our fast paced, action packed world. In that brief respite an opportunity exists to slow our breathing and our busy minds. Snow Globe Wishes reminded me to take a pause during this season, and focus on the true gifts of my loved ones right in front of me. In this upbeat rhyming read-aloud that’s beautifully illustrated, a heavy snowstorm causes a power outage in the community. Families huddle together to make the most of a dark and quiet holiday. Forts are built, candles lit, and families snuggle together for the night. In the light of day all the neighbors come out to play in the brilliance of freshly fallen snow. Wouldn’t it be wonderful to take advantage of unexpected time like this with our own neighbors and communities? A I hope to make an extra effort to do just that this yearwith or without a power outage.

the teddy bears christmas surprise cvrTHE TEDDY BEARS’ CHRISTMAS SURPRISE
Written by Bruno Hächler
Illustrated by Anastasia Arkhipova
(Mineedition; $17.99, ages 5-6)

I was intrigued by the front and back cover flaps for The Teddy Bears’ Christmas Surprise. Several plush bears carry toys out into the night, and on the back flap it reads, “Christmas is about knowing the right kind of gift to give.” Don’t we all wonder and worry about what the ‘right’ kind of gift to give is for the holidays?

Following the teddy bears through the rich illustrations, I was captivated by the idea that the reader was being led on a serious mission. Bears from all corners of the town come together for a secret meeting. Just as quickly as they meet, one bear gives a nod, and they all depart again. The bears succeed in their crafty plan to replace all the gifts under Christmas trees with handwritten notes. When the townspeople find notes instead of sparkly packages they are distraught to say the least. As they calm down to read what the notes say they are moved in unexpected ways to connect with loved ones. Will the beloved or long forgotten teddy bears with such big hearts return the original gifts under the trees? You’ll have to pick up the book yourself to find out.

  • Reviewed by Ozma Bryant

 

Read about last year’s picks here.

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Creative Chaos Links Two Terrific Tales – Teach Your Giraffe to Ski and Scarlet’s Magic Paintbrush

TEACH YOUR GIRAFFE TO SKI
Written by Viviane Elbee,
Illustrated by Danni Gowdy
(Albert Whitman & Company, $16.99, Ages 3-7)

&

SCARLET’S MAGIC PAINTBRUSH
Written by Melissa Stoller 
Illustrated by Sandie Sonke
(Spork/Clear Fork Press, $16.99, Ages 3-7)

 

 

are reviewed today by Cathy Ballou Mealey.

 

Teach Your Giraffe to Ski.Teach Your Giraffe to Ski book cover illustration Although the chalet is cozy, nothing will deter Giraffe from donning skis and gliding with ease. A cautious child protagonist sticks close by, offering emotional support and practical advice to the novice skier.

Elbee adeptly mixes humor with tips on safety, etiquette and introductory ski technique. Giraffe grins through the typical goofs and gaffes associated with learning something new. Eager and fearless, Giraffe’s enthusiasm is tempered by the child’s caution and protective concern. Once she’s mastered the basics, they head to The Big Scary Slope! Readers will cling to the edge of their lift seats anticipating a slick, speedy, swerving conclusion to this snowy, sporting tale.

Gowdy’s cartoon-like illustrations are bright and colorful, incorporating a playful menagerie of unlikely skiers. The gleeful expressions of Giraffe and timid trepidation of the child are counterbalanced between spots and full page spreads. Slipping, sliding and gliding are conveyed via whipping scarf tails, swerving ski trails and exuberant snowy splatters. Whether you are bunny slope bound, black diamond material, or even a lodge loafer, Teach Your Giraffe to Ski is tons of fun.

 

cover art from Scarlet's Magic PaintbrushCreative determination also threads through Scarlet’s Magic Paintbrush, the story of a young artist who learns to appreciate the power of a hands-on, personal touch. This is a sweet debut book from author Melissa Stoller and illustrator Sandie Sonke.

Scarlet finds a magic paintbrush that does her bidding, creating fairies, unicorns and princesses that are perfect masterpieces. But losing the magic brush creates a dilemma for Scarlet. After she searches high and low for the magic brush, she tries painting with regular, non-magical brushes. While the results disappoint her, she doesn’t give up. In a clever twist, Stoller makes her protagonist get creative; painting with her left hand, trying a homemade brush and even using her fingers.

Sonke fills the pages with soft blue clouds and sparkling stars, framing Scarlet and her range of canvases with colorful detail. The magic paintbrush has emotional, animated expressions, and observant readers will enjoy following a faithful pooch that trails Scarlet throughout her artistic quest.

Scarlet’s Magic Paintbrush is an open invitation for young artists to explore ideas of perfection and frustration when it comes to mastering technique and finding a personal style. The magical paintbrush element will appeal to many, while the celebration of self-expression and creativity ultimately shine as the most important aspect of original work. A perfect book to pair with paint and canvas for budding artists!

 

  • Reviewed by Cathy Ballou Mealey

 

Where obtained:  I reviewed either an advanced reader’s copy from the publisher or a library edition and received no other compensation. The opinions expressed here are my own.

 

Find another recent Epic18 debut review here.

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World Make Way – Art Inspired Poetry Edited by Lee Bennett Hopkins

WORLD MAKE WAY:
New Poems Inspired by Art
from The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Edited by Lee Bennett Hopkins
(Abrams BYR; $16.99, Ages 5-9)

 

World Make Way cover image of Cat Watching a Spider by Ōide Tōkō

 

A curious, crouching cat on the book’s cover immediately drew me into World Make Way: New Poems Inspired by Art from The Metropolitan Museum of Art edited by Lee Bennett Hopkins. Eighteen thoughtful and evocative poems and the accompanying works of art that prompted their creation kept me turning the pages. This beautiful collection is everything a poetry anthology for children should be: diverse, original and, as the title suggests, inspiring. In the book’s back matter I learned that Lee Bennett Hopkins, the editor of World Make Way, holds the Guinness Book of World Records citation for compiling the most anthologies for children, making him more than well-suited to spearhead this satisfying project in conjunction with the Met.

I appreciate the breadth of art that was selected and the variety of poems that were commissioned for World Make Way. There is something that will appeal to every reader who dives in, whether they like short, simple poems or those more complex and layered. There are serious poems and those that have fun with the reader like Marilyn Singer’s poem, Paint Me, the first in the book. In it the teen subject of Gustav Klimt’s portrait, Mäda Primavesi, bids the artist to make haste and finish up the painting because she’s such a busy person, hence the book’s title World Make Way, a line she utters in desperation! She has places to go. People to see. After all, if her family can afford to have Klimt paint her, she’s likely a socialite. Ultimately the book will show children how to look at art with fresh eyes and take from it something unique to them. Art evokes something different in each person who beholds it and the poems included perfectly capture that.

One particular poem that stayed with me was Young Ashoka Sundari by Amy Ludwig Vanderwater inspired by Shiva and Parvati Playing Chaupar: Folio from a Rasamanjari Series, 1694-95 by Devidasa of Nurpur. Her poem introduces readers to Ashoka who secretly observes her parents: I stand behind this neem tree / to watch my parents play / a game of chaupar / on a tiger rug / beneath bright mango sky. Offering a child’s perspective in her poem, Vanderwater helped me to have a lightbulb moment with the artwork. It’s not always about what we see when observing art, it’s also about what or who the artist left out, or where the scene is set. What a wonderful conversation starter! What does this art say to you? What do you think is happening here now? How does this picture make you feel? What might happen now that the child has witnessed this scene?

In my multiple readings I found myself wondering what I’d write about a certain piece of art such as Henri Rousseau’s The Repast of the Lion, but if I ever see the painting again, I’ll forever associate J. Patrick Lewis’s poem with it. Now that he’s fed and jaguar-full— / Finally his appetite is dull— And of Joan Bransfield Graham’s Great Indian Fruit Bat, a poem about a painting of the same name attributed to Bhawani Das or a follower, 1777-82  I marveled at her internal rhyme and alliteration. As my wings whisk me, swooping through / this black velvet night, who will admire / my elegant attire, the intricacy …  A bat’s point of view, fantastic!

Other featured poets are: Alma Flor Ada, Cynthia S. Cotten, Rebecca Kai Dotlich, Julie Fogliano, Charles Ghigna, Lee Bennett Hopkins, Irene Latham, Elaine Magliaro, Guadalupe Garcia McCall, Marilyn Nelson, Naomi Shihab Nye, Ann Whitford Paul, Carole Boston Weatherford and Janet Wong. Other featured artists are: Rosa Bonheur, Fernando Botero, Mary Cassatt, Liberale Da Verona, Leonardo Da Vinci, Han Gan, Martin Johnson Heade, Frank Henderson, Utagawa Hiroshige, Winslow Homer, Kerry James Marshall, José Guadalupe Posada and Ōide Tōkō.

While I can definitely see educators enjoying the book for its varying forms of poetry and the individual interpretations of the poets to accompany the magnificent works of art, I can also easily see a parent sharing the book before any museum visit or simply as a way to spark a child’s imagination. It certainly sparked mine.

  • Reviewed by Ronna Mandel

Read a review of another poetry collection here.

 

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H is For Haiku – For Mother’s Day, Give the Gift of Poetry

H IS FOR HAIKU:
A TREASURY OF HAIKU FROM A TO Z
Written by Sydell Rosenberg
Illustrations and lettering by Sawsan Chalabi
With a forward by Amy Losak
(Penny Candy Books; $16.95, ages 4 and up)

H is For Haiku cover illustration

I cannot think of a more fitting tribute for Mother’s Day than to share this moving and thoughtful collection of haiku that Amy Losak, daughter of late poet Sydell Rosenberg, assembled and submitted for publication. The release in April of Rosenberg’s picture book, H is For Haiku, was ” … the culmination of a decades-long dream,” says Losak. I’m so glad that Losak was determined to share her mother’s gift with children and that Penny Candy Books made that dream a reality. Now we get to reap the rewards—reading them! Over and over again.

 

Int. artwork by Sawsan Chalabi from H is For Haiku by Sydell Rosenberg PCB
Interior spread from H is For Haiku: A Treasury of Haiku From A to Z written by Sydell Rosenberg with illustrations and lettering by Sawsan Chalabi, Penny Candy Books ©2018.

 

It’s easy to tell when haiku comes from the heart as is the case for this New York inspired alphabetic haiku journey. Rosenberg’s homage to her city jumps off the pages and transcends time. Nothing escaped her observant eye, whether it was a bird, a parked car, a squirrel, an umbrella or a watering can. Having grown up in New York, I found so many favorites but I’ll try to pick out just a few. The rest will rely on you. No doubt you’ll agree that three simple lines of poetry can be oh so powerful.

With each letter comes a new delight, an awakening of the senses. Feel the wind blow alongside the gentle touch of petals in Plunging downhill/Petals falling in her hair/Girl on a bike or imagine your favorite ice cream flavor as you claim your spot on a long line in Queuing for ice cream/Sweat-sprinkled office workers/On Queens Boulevard. How amazing that in just 17 or so syllables (Rosenberg wasn’t a stickler) I could be transported instantly to my commuter days from decades ago when I took the subway daily to work! I recalled the heaviness of the humidity on my face, the barrage of assorted smells and the oppressiveness of the heat culminating with the need for a cool scoop of chocolate chip in a sugar cone. Rosenberg’s masterful haiku crafting shines yet again in Jumping Quietly/The cat follows a peach pit/Tossed from the terrace. Can you picture the fire escape or the cat jumping high to catch the pit before it hits the pavement?

 

Interior artwork by Sawsan Chalabi from H is For Haiku by Sydell Rosenberg PCB
Interior spread from H is For Haiku: A Treasury of Haiku From A to Z written by Sydell Rosenberg with illustrations and lettering by Sawsan Chalabi, Penny Candy Books ©2018.

 

The treasury includes imaginative and colorful artwork from Sawsan Chalabi. A particular favorite is letter D where she created a concrete poem in that she gives the haiku raindrop shapes adding to the sensation the language creates. The illustrations have an upbeat and retro feel at the same time and are not only pleasing to the eye but wonderful interpretations of Rosenberg’s words.

Treat yourself, your kids, friends and family to the joy that is H is For Haiku and see which ones resonate with you. Most importantly, listen to your mother, and your heart. Happy Mother’s Day!

  • Review by Ronna Mandel

Amy Losak’s comments:

“Years after Syd died in 1996, I took up her goal of publishing one of her kids’ manuscripts from the 1970’s/1980’s. She was a charter member of the Haiku Society of America in 1968, which was “born” in NYC. It turns 50 years old this year. (I am a member now too.) Many of mom’s “city haiku” reflect her urban surroundings and sensibility, but they are universal and timeless, as well.

Haiku are brief (they make perfect “pocket poetry”) but they impel readers to slow down and linger over something they may ordinarily overlook. As I say in my introduction, haiku help make so-called “small moments” big. Haiku is a way to enter with awareness into the world around us. Children and adults alike will relate to these evocative ‘word-pictures.'”

To order the book:
https://www.pennycandybooks.com/shop/haiku

Read more here:

https://www.pennycandybooks.com/blog-1/losak

http://readlearnandbehappy.blogspot.com/2017/04/happy-international-haiku-day-national.html

About the publisher:
PCB is dedicated to diversity in children’s literature. It’s a small, traditional press having “big conversations.”
Check them out at www.pennycandybooks.com or on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter

 

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Snow Sisters! Written by Kerri Kokias

SNOW SISTERS!
Written by Kerri Kokias

Illustrated by Teagan White
(Knopf BYR; $17.99, Ages 3-7)

is reviewed today by Cathy Ballou Mealey.

 

Cover image from SNOW SISTERS! Written by Kerri Kokias with art by Teagan White

 

When swirling snowflakes fill the morning sky, two creative, independent Snow Sisters! react in unique and complementary ways throughout author Kerri Kokias’s debut picture book.

The title page, a peek into their cozy shared bedroom, hints at the distinctive personalities of each sister. One girl lies sprawled across her bed with toys and clothes strewn about, while the other sleeps tucked in tight with toys in a row and an alarm clock nearby. After they wake, the first sister, on left hand pages, dresses in snow gear and rushes outside. She throws, builds, and tracks alongside a fluffy squirrel. Her sister, on right hand pages, opts for indoor comforts. She keeps busy with books, baking and snowflake making.

 

Snow Sisters! by Kerri Kokias Interior artwork by Teagan White
Interior spread from Snow Sisters! Written by Kerri Kokias, illustrated by Teagan White, Knopf BYR ©2017.

 

Kokias’s clever parallel text draws us into their individual worlds right up until an exciting mid-book switcheroo. When the outdoors becomes too cold and wet for one sister, the second is drawn outside after spotting a chubby bunny from the window. “Bye!” the sisters greet one another as they trade indoor and outdoor delights. Each embarks on re-visiting fresh interpretations of the words we heard in the beginning: baking, making, throwing, building, etc. The short, simple, active verbs make this book a reading experience that is very accessible for young ears and eyes.

 

Interior artwork from Snow Sisters! by Kerri Kokias illustrated by Teagan White
Interior spread from Snow Sisters! Written by Kerri Kokias, illustrated by Teagan White, Knopf BYR ©2017.

 

White’s homey illustrations utilize a purple-pink palette for one sister, and orange-peach tones for the other, complementing their respective brunette and auburn hair colors. Interior scenes are accented with mellow teal greens, contrasting with the beautiful outdoor images glowing with purple and pale grey snow. Young readers will enjoy discovering amusing repeated details from scene to scene, whether it be favorite stuffed toys or paper snowflakes.

 

Interior spread from Snow Sisters! by Kerri Kokias illustrated by Teagan White
Interior spread from Snow Sisters! Written by Kerri Kokias with illustrations by Teagan White, Knopf BYR ©2017.

 

The final spread repeats the book title, Snow Sisters!, and shows us how the two have found a time and place to come together and share their snowy fun. Readers young and old, with or without siblings, will appreciate the abundant and inclusive approaches for having fun and celebrating snow in this delightful, cheery debut.

Click here for author tour dates.

  • Reviewed by Cathy Ballou Mealey

 

Where obtained: I reviewed a copy from my local library and received no other compensation. The opinions expressed here are my own.

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