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Picture Book Review – The Wall and the Wild Blog Tour

THE WALL AND THE WILD

Written by Christina Dendy

Illustrated by Katie Rewse

(Lantana Publishing; $17.99, Ages 4-8) 

 

 

 

 

Welcome to Day Four of The Wall and the Wild Blog Tour!

Scroll up or down for the full tour graphic.

 

 

The Wall and the Wild, the debut picture book from Christina Dendy with vibrant art by Katie Rewse is in its own lovely way, a call of the wild. Lured in by the cover illustration, I was beckoned on by the gratifying marriage of language and illustrations.

As the story opens, readers see a treetop view of a young girl, Ana, creating a garden. However, she’s overly picky about what she selects. There can be no flaws in what seeds she plants and her face shows when she is dissatisfied. “YOU, stay out THERE” Ana warns the disorderly WILD which, like nature, is really all around her. What doesn’t appear perfect she “throws into the untidy WILD.” With the WILD presented early on by Dendy as a character, my curiosity was piqued.

 

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Interior spread from The Wall and the Wild written by Christina Dendy and illustrated by Katie Rewse, Lantana Publishing ©2021.

 

Intent on keeping her plot pristine, Ana constructs a stone wall, and soon her garden bursts with color and an abundance of beautiful flowers, fruits, and vegetables. Not only do friends come by to admire Ana’s garden, but so do creatures big and small. This feast for the eyes might please others, but Ana seems to only focus on the negative. I love how the author has added another important layer for children in this story about how limiting perfectionism can be. Ana finds and plucks plant intruders from the WILD whose presence mars the overall neat appearance. These weeds weren’t something Ana could tolerate. So, once again, along with more imperfect seeds, she tosses them all away.

 

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Interior art from The Wall and the Wild written by Christina Dendy and illustrated by Katie Rewse, Lantana Publishing ©2021.

 

Now Ana is more determined than ever. She adds onto her stone wall to prevent the WILD from coming in. Yet, rather than thrive in these conditions, Ana’s perfectly tidy garden seems to wither. The illustrations convey a quality of dullness. When visitors dwindle along with the plants’ health, Ana begins to question her intentions. Perhaps she was too controlling? Maybe it’s time to see what’s out in the WILD where all her discards have gone. “On the other side, voices babble, footsteps patter, and sunlight beams.” There’s a lightness to the prose and a hint at what’s to come.

 

 

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Interior art from The Wall and the Wild written by Christina Dendy and illustrated by Katie Rewse, Lantana Publishing ©2021.

 

To her surprise, a world of remarkable beauty awaits Ana beyond her wall. Here I grew excited to see Ana grow along with the WILD garden that’s flourished in spite of her efforts to thwart it. Seeing her realize that, as Dendy mentions in her back matter on ecosystems, “Seeds don’t need to look the same or ‘perfect’ to grow into perfectly beautiful, healthy plants,” is a rewarding moment in the story.

This lovely message of caring for all and how there’s room for everyone at the table or in the garden is as rich as the soil that Ana first tended. Something I missed on the first reading, but noted later on and truly appreciated as someone coming from a family with hearing loss is that Rewse has included the main character wearing hearing aids in her art. I can easily see this charming picture book included in classrooms’ STEM curriculums and as a great way to encourage outdoor, nature-based learning.

  •  Reviewed by Ronna Mandel

 

 

 

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Picture Book Review – Gwendolyn’s Pet Garden

GWENDOLYN’S PET GARDEN

Written by Anne Renaud

Illustrated by Rashin Kheiriyeh

(Nancy Paulsen Books; $17.99, Ages 4-8)

 

 

In the picture book, Gwendolyn’s Pet Garden by Anne Renaud, we know the problem from the opening line: “Gwendolyn Newberry-Fretz wanted a pet.” A very relatable problem indeed. Yet, Gwendolyn’s parents are not on board with the pet idea and, instead, get her some dirt which “smells of possibilities” to them. Gwendolyn thinks it smells like a swamp! Yet, once the garden gets underway, she reconsiders how she feels about this compromise.

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Interior spread from Gwendolyn’s Pet Garden written by Anne Renaud and illustrated by Rashin Kheiriyeh, Penguin BYR ©2021.

 

Rashin Kheiriyeh’s illustrations peppered with bright accents pull you into Gwendolyn’s world, whether she’s suggesting various pets or plotting her planter. I feel the joys of gardening including the excitement of watching plants grow from seed.

 

Gwendolyn's Pet Garden int2
Interior art from Gwendolyn’s Pet Garden written by Anne Renaud and illustrated by Rashin Kheiriyeh, Penguin BYR ©2021.

 

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I like how the back matter ties it all together, explaining what’s needed for kids to start their own gardens. Seed-lending libraries are explained and encouraged—a concept I hope catches on as well as the book-lending libraries we have in many neighborhoods. The idea of repurposing no-longer-needed library card catalog cabinets to house seeds brilliant!

 

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