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The Star Festival or Tanabata Matsuri – A Guest Post by Moni Ritchie Hadley

FIND OUT IN THIS GUEST POST

WHY DEBUT AUTHOR MONI RITCHIE HADLEY

CHOSE TO WRITE ABOUT THE STAR FESTIVAL 

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StarFestival CVR

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Starred Review – School Library Journal

THE STAR FESTIVAL, also known as the Tanabata Matsuri, takes place in Japan on the seventh day of the seventh month. It is celebrated on July 7th in regions following the gregorian calendar and August 7th of the lunar calendar.

I researched many beautiful landscapes and images, knowing that one would eventually become the backdrop of my story. Which were my top choices, and how did I choose?

Hanami Matsuri, the Cherry Blossom Festival, takes place in the Spring determined by the sakura, or cherry blossom, forecast in particular regions. Sometimes performances and tea ceremonies are performed under the trees, but the main activity is to picnic under the pink-blossomed sky.

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Hanami Festival
“Hanami Festival” by dvdhaven 🙂 is licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

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Hina Matsuri has many names, the Japanese Doll Festival, Girl’s Day, and the Peach Festival, due to the time of year that it’s held-March 3rd. Originally, dolls made of paper and straw were sent down a river to set misfortunes adrift. In modern times, fancier dolls displayed inside homes invite prosperity and happiness.

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 Hinamatsuri Japanese Doll Festival or Girls' Day
“Japanese Doll Festival, Girls’ Day: Hinamatsuri, Kyoto; ひな祭り、ひな人形、京都” by Nullumayulife is licensed under CC BY 2.0
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Yuki Matsuri, the Sapporo Snow Festival, is celebrated in Hokkaido, a colder region of Japan. Famous for its ice sculptures, this modern-day festival began in 1950 when a group of high school students sculpted snow figures in Odori Park. Contests are held every February and attract visitors from all over the world.
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Yuki Matsuri Japanese Ice Temple photo by Aaron Quigley
“Yuki-Matsuri Japanese Ice temple” by Aaron Quigley is licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0
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The festival that became the backdrop to my story is equally beautiful to all of these mentioned. It was the folklore behind the Star Festival that drew me in. Orihime and Hikoboshi, two star-crossed lovers, forbidden to see each other but once a year, cross the Milky Way bridge and meet on the day of the Tanabata, offering a parallel to Keiko, my main character, crossing a sea of celebration to find her Oba or grandmother.

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Keiko's bridge The Star Festival
Interior spread from The Star Festival written by Moni Ritchie Hadley and illustrated by Mizuho Fujisawa, Albert Whitman & Company ©2021.
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In a few days, you can celebrate the Tanabata Matsuri in your home or town. Gaze at the stars and make a tanzaku (paper wish) to hang on a tree.

Wishes come true at the Star Festival!

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             • Guest Post by Moni Ritchie Hadley
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Author Website: MoniRitchie.com
On Twitter and Instagram – @bookthreader
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Illustrator Website: Mizuho Fujisawa
On Instagram @mizuhofujisawa
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Three Halloween Books for Little Ones

NEW CHILDREN’S BOOKS FOR HALLOWEEN

PART TWO

A ROUNDUP

 

 

This year there were so many fun new Halloween and Halloween season books to choose from, especially for the littlest trick-or-treaters, that we decided to share one more roundup to cover them all. If your new faves weren’t included, please let us know in the comments what other books you’d recommend.

 

One Black Cat coverONE BLACK CAT
Written by Robie Rogge

Illustrated by August Ro
(Little Simon; $7.99, Ages 1-5)

This die-cut novelty book is so cute! Shaped like a black cat (it even stands up!), you undo a notch at the collar to reach the rhyming story within. “Black Cat sets out on Halloween / in the dark, without being seen.” Robie Rogge’s 12-page board book, One Black Cat, follows a kitty and trick-or-treaters as they enjoy Halloween. The adorable illustrations by August Ro are in fall-toned colors. I especially like the way Black Cat’s friend (at the end) is drawn.

 

IN A SPOOKY HAUNTED HOUSE:
 A Pop-Up Adventure

Written by Joel Stern
From an idea by Nancy Hall

Illustrated by Christopher Lee
(Little Simon; $12.99, Ages 3-5)

In a Spooky Haunted House by Joel Stern is a beautifully made 14-page pop-up board book. We’re welcomed in for a funny tour through the rooms. “Now here’s a hallway where young witches learn to fly a broom. / This one’s flown right through a hole and found a secret tomb.” Just about every kind of (not-very-spooky) ghoul is depicted. My favorite scene reveals ghosts making pancakes; detail shows the other items in the kitchen, including a silly vampire bat. The well-constructed rhymes and fun art by Christopher Lee make this book a winning Halloween adventure.

 

UNICORNS ARE THE WORST!
Written and illustrated by Alex Willan
(Simon & Schuster BYR; 17.,99, Ages 4-8)

Unicorns Are the Worst! by Alex Willan is the Halloween book for kids who aren’t that into Halloween. This funny story features a goblin who, of course, thinks unicorns are the worst—a clever twist on the ever-popular unicorn tales. Willan’s art contrasts the goblin’s world with that of the unicorns, building the pace. The variety in the illustrations really works. For example, a sepia-toned scene spotlights super-secret goblin magic, and panels throughout give sections of the book a graphic feel. There are also LOL images, such as where the goblin’s trying to wash that all that annoying unicorn glitter out of his smock.

 

 

 

  • Disclosure: Good Reads With Ronna is now a Bookshop.org affiliate and will make a small commission from the books sold via this site at no extra cost to you. If you’d like to help support this blog, its team of kidlit reviewers as well as independent bookshops nationwide, please consider purchasing your books from Bookshop.org using our affiliate links above (or below). Thanks!
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    Recommended Reads for the Week of 10/26/20
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Kids Book Review – There Was An Old Gator Who Swallowed a Moth

THERE WAS AN OLD GATOR WHO SWALLOWED A MOTH
Written by B. J. Lee
Illustrated by David Opie
(Pelican Publishing; $16.99, Ages 0-5)

 

There Was an Old Gator Who Swallowed a Moth book cover art

 

You know that fab feeling you get when you hear a good joke and notice the corners of your mouth pushing out a huge smile? Well that’s also the feeling you and your children will get when reading B. J. Lee’s boisterous new book, There Was An Old Gator Who Swallowed a Moth with illustrations by David Opie. Yes, all it takes is one hungry alligator to get the action going in this Florida-animals-themed variation of the beloved cumulative rhyme There Was an Old Woman Who Swallowed a Fly and reminiscent of kidlit fave, A Fly Went By.

Soaking up the sun and minding his own business, the titular gator finds a winged visitor has landed on his snout. You can guess what happens but still be teased to read on.

“There was an old gator who swallowed a moth.
I don’t know why he swallowed the moth.
It made him cough.”

 

int illustration from There Was an Old Gator Who Swallowed a Moth
Interior illustration from There Was an Old Gator Who Swallowed a Moth written by B. J. Lee and illustrated by David Opie, Pelican Publishing ©2019.

 

int art of pelican from There Was an Old Gator Who Swallowed a Moth
Interior illustration from There Was an Old Gator Who Swallowed a Moth written by B. J. Lee and illustrated by David Opie, Pelican Publishing ©2019.

 

Gator then goes on to swallow a crab (I mean it did give him a jab!) And the slew of Sunshine State creatures eventually eaten also includes an eel, a ray, a pelican (see above), a panther, and a manatee. Opie’s illustration of ALL the animals squished inside gator’s stomach is spot on and one of my faves, but the one above where there’s still some room gives you a good idea of the vibe going on. While reading the book, be sure to take note of the expressions and body language depicting how no one wants to be anywhere near crab’s pinching claws.

 

int illustration from There Was An Old Gator Who Swallowed a Moth
Interior illustration from There Was an Old Gator Who Swallowed a Moth written by B. J. Lee and illustrated by David Opie, Pelican Publishing ©2019.

 

You may think that when the gator swallows the shark his tummy will be full, but no, he and Lee don’t stop there and that’s exactly why the (belly) laughs will linger with every page turn. What a humorous way to learn about survival of the fittest in a Florida setting!

 

interior illustr from There Was an Old Gator Who Swallowed a Moth
Interior illustration from There Was an Old Gator Who Swallowed a Moth written by B. J. Lee and illustrated by David Opie, Pelican Publishing ©2019.

 

This guy’s just greedy enough and silly enough to gulp down the entire lagoon which pushes him beyond capacity if you get my drift. In a series of hysterical illustrations that work wonderfully together with Lee’s terrific tale, it’s conveyed how totally stunned and slightly repulsed the ejected animals are. And if the above artwork doesn’t hint at a whopping “Get ready! I’m about to go gator-wild!” I don’t know what will!

Share this fun story with anyone you know who loves a rip-roaring read aloud and watch the grins grow along with the gator’s gut.

  • Reviewed by Ronna Mandel

 

 

 

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