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Two New Picture Books for Eid al-Fitr

EID AL-FITR PICTURE BOOKS

 

 

 

Noura's Crescent Moon cover girl look up at colorful crescent moonNOURA’S CRESCENT MOON
Written by Zainab Khan
Illustrated by Nabila Adani
(Candlewick Press; $18.99, Ages 4-8)

Starred Review – Kirkus

In Zainab Khan’s picture book debut, readers meet Noura as Ramadan, a lunar holiday observed by Muslims, is ending. As the story begins she’s eager to see the Eid moon. Her father explains that in “… all the years I went with my parents to find the new moon, I only saw it once: a tiny sliver.” Readers soon see the beautiful dress Noura’s mother has made for Eid (the end of Ramadan) prayer and also find out that “Ramadan can’t be more than 30 days, so Eid has to start tonight or tomorrow night.” The daytime fasting ends and three special days of celebrations begin.

Some Muslims head to nearby mountains or the highest point around to watch for the Eid moon which is exactly what Noura’s family plans to do. Noura hopes the clouds will not obstruct her view. “Moon, please come out. I’d like to see you on my first fast.” On the hilltop, families gather for picnics and to await the moonrise. If it doesn’t appear, that means one more day of fasting. At sunset, that day’s fasting is over, and Noura enjoys a delicious picnic iftar of potato pakoras, dates, tamarind chutney, and her favorite, pink (rose) milk. Just when everyone thinks there will still be one more day of Ramadan, the clouds part, revealing a beaming crescent moon. This is also one of my favorite spreads in the book. The gradient purple sky leads our eyes to the far right where the crescent moon glows.

There’s a glossary in the backmatter but the context of the story along with the lovely illustration clues help make this picture book easy to understand and such a delight to share with children. Eid Mubarak! Happy Eid!

 

Looking for the Eid Moon cover two little girls under starry sky one holding binoculars.LOOKING FOR THE EID MOON
Written by Sahtinay Abaza
Illustrated by Sandra Eide
(Sleeping Bear Press; $18.99, Ages 4-8)

From the beginning of this charming picture book, sisters Sara and Lulu begin looking for the moon. Of course, later there would be a party with family and friends where Sara could wear her star-themed dress but “For years, the moon marked important Muslim holidays and dates. And Eid wouldn’t begin until the crescent moon was spotted.”

Sara and Lulu head out to the backyard equipped with a blanket, binoculars, and a flashlight. They search and search the sky with no luck. If there is a moon out, it’s blocked by clouds. The girls get scared on their own and, as the big sister, Sara takes it upon herself to help allay Lulu’s fears. Her thoughtfulness is a lovely element in this story. When their mother eventually says it’s time to go back indoors she tells them the moon has been spotted. Lulu cries. She wanted to be the first to see the Eid moon. To quell Lulu’s disappointment, Sara devises a creative and secret plan: crafting glowing moon rocks filled with coins courtesy of the Eid moon accompanied by a rhyming poem.

Eide’s artwork is cheerful and readers will get a sense of the sisters’ emotions in every illustration. I liked the spread where the girls’ mom flashes her flashlight. “Look! A moonbeam!” Lulu’s excitement is precious.

Not only was this picture book inspired by the author’s family tradition, Looking for the Eid Moon also conveys a caring sibling relationship and a great role model for young readers. The author’s note in the backmatter explains the two Eid holidays that occur annually. “Eid al-Fitr is a three-day holiday that celebrates the end of Ramadan (the month of fast). Eid al-Adha is a four-day holiday that begins at the end of pilgrimage, in which Muslims travel to the city of Mecca for worship.”

 

Other Recommended Reads:

Ramadan and Eid al-Fitr cover family celebrating holidayRAMADAN AND EID AL-FITR
Written by Sara Khan
Illustrated by Nadiyah Suyatna
(words & pictures; $14.99, Ages 5-10)

“Assalaamu alaykum!
Peace be upon you!”

Opening this joyful-looking picture book, I was greeted by a message of peace. The narrator, a young girl named Raya tells readers that she’s excited to share info about Ramadan and Eid al-Fitr, the holiday celebrated when Ramadan ends as you’ve learned from the reviews above. We’re introduced to her parents whom she calls Mama and Aba as well as her sweet little kitty.

One illustration shows Raya gifted with a special calendar with “a good deed suggestion for each day of the month.” Raya explains how one feature of Ramadan is daylight fasting, but she is too young to partake. I like that Khan has shared Raya’s introspection as she wonders what it will be like to abstain from eating and drinking when she is older. Readers learn that in addition to fasting, it’s important to be on one’s best behavior to please Allah or God.

As noted in the other picture books, the meal to end the fast is called iftar and always features a date. Rayah points out how her family is culturally diverse so there is no one traditional meal making it an opportunity to try lots of different foods. And since Ramadan is a time of giving to those less fortunate, Raya tells readers how members of her family help out in a food kitchen or by donating toys and clothes to charity. Selfless giving is a way to get closer to Allah. This also includes praying and reading “the Qur’an—the holy book of Islam.”

When Ramadan ends it’s time to celebrate breaking the fast or Eid al-Fitr. Muslims spend quality family time and also come together as a community to have fun, decorate their homes, eat delicious meals, and continue performing acts of kindness. Rayah, like most children, describes how she enjoys getting and giving gifts and buying new clothes for the holiday. One tradition for girls and women, Rayah explains is: “Getting pretty henna patterns applied to my hands.”The book’s backmatter includes eight pages packed with facts, a quiz, a recipe, and a card-making activity providing an excellent introduction to anyone eager to learn about Ramadan and Eid al-Fitr. With its colorful art, accessible text, and multicultural characters this new picture book would be an ideal addition to any home, school, or public library’s collection.

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Picture Book Review – Bing Bang Pling

 

BING BANG PLING

Written by Deb Adamson

Illustrated by Candice Hartsough

(McSea Books; $16.95, Ages 4-8)

 

Bing Bang Pling cover girl and building tools.

 

Do you have a budding builder in your home? Since I’ve never constructed anything more involved than a Lego set, I vicariously enjoyed all the measuring, sawing, and hammering in Bing Bang Pling, a rhyming read-aloud written by Deb Adamson and illustrated by Candice Hartsough.

From the upbeat first sentence, “So excited! Today’s the day. First we work, then we play,” readers are pulled into the main character’s activity helping her parents build a swing set.

 

Bing_Bang_Pling_int1_truck_backs_up_delivery Bing Bang Plint int1 truck backs up delivery.
Interior spread from Bing Bang Pling written by Deb Adamson and illustrated by Candice Hartsough, McSea Books ©2023.

 

After the building materials are delivered (see spread above), the girl counts out the nuts and screws. When I was her age, I would have done the same thing. Big pieces of wood are a lot less fun. Adults will appreciate the text’s mention of how the instruction sheet for putting together the swing set might not be that easy to understand. Another important detail is showing all the protective gear needed before embarking on this family project. Children need to know that being around tools means safety first.

 

Bing Bang Pling int2 Daddy finishes sawing.
Interior spread from Bing Bang Pling written by Deb Adamson and illustrated by Candice Hartsough, McSea Books ©2023.

 

Lots of the tasks the main character does do not require a lot of supervision such as chalk-lining, sanding, painting, and digging holes (to mount the frame). Hartsough is careful to show her just observing the more labor-intensive work not meant for kids due to sharp blades.

 

Bing Bang Pling int3 Mommy raking spreading mulch.
Interior spread from Bing Bang Pling written by Deb Adamson and illustrated by Candice Hartsough, McSea Books ©2023.

 

When reading aloud, parents, teachers, and librarians can play up the sounds each piece of equipment makes and then discuss the individual functions of the tools once the book is finished. I like how the illustrations include a cute ginger kitty who, like my two cats, doesn’t want to miss out on any action.

Adamson and Hartsough have created a likable story demonstrating that spending quality time together can mean lots of things whether going to a park, playing a board game, or as in this case, constructing a swing set for all to enjoy. For me, the big takeaway is empowerment and how, with some help and guidance from adults, kids can get involved and feel a sense of pride in their accomplishments.

 

  • Reviewed by Ronna Mandel

 

 

 

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Best New Children’s Books for Father’s Day 2023

FATHER’S DAY BOOKS

~ A ROUNDUP ~

 

 

 

REVIEWS:

Dads Can Do It All Cover dads doing many activitiesDADS CAN DO IT ALL!
Written by Ted Maass
Illustrated by Ekaterina Trukhan

(Grosset & Dunlap; 8.99, Ages 0-3)

I reviewed Moms Can Do It All! last month and am happy to share its equally charming companion, Dads Can Do It All! with you.

Maass and Trukhan engage children with their easy rhyme and vibrant art in this 18-page board book. “There are dads who sing songs and write music with words, and there are dads who take care of dogs, cats, and birds.” Little ones are encouraged to believe in themselves and in what they might be one day. Dads are shown role modeling in myriad jobs from mail carriers, farmers, construction workers, chefs, and nurses to firefighters, clerks, hairstylists, astronauts, and homemakers. The variety of occupations depicted can open the door for discussing all kinds of positions people have at an age when children love to dress up and play pretend. 

Like the companion board book, here readers are treated to bold colors and simply shaped characters that will capture and hold young ones’ attention. With its convenient bookplate for personalization, this book can be gifted to new dads by anyone including baby! • Reviewed by Ronna Mandel

 

Papá’s Magical Water-Jug ClockPapas Magical Water-Jug Clock cover boy giving out water
Written by  Jesús Trejoa
Illustrated by Eliza Kinkz
(Minerva; $18.99, Ages 3-6)

If you enjoy picture books that entertain on many levels and are more than a Father’s Day book, that’s what you’ll get with this delightful debut from Jesús Trejoa, a popular Mexican American comedian. The multiple hooks of this father-son tale such as humor, gardening and equipment, animals and nature, diversity, and grown-up jobs, will pull in young readers. The family closeness and joyful illustrations will keep them reading.

Is Papá’s water-jug clock truly magical? That’s what children will find out as little Jesús joins his father on a hot and busy Saturday to help out in the family landscaping business. “Remember to drink lots of agua,” his mama reminds him with some innocent foreshadowing before her son starts loading up the van. Papá has already told Jesús that when the water runs out the work day is over meaning the water jug serves as a clock as well as a much-needed source of hydration. That is if Jesús didn’t give away so much water at each home they visited!

Jesús encounters animals every place they go. First cats, then a dog, and even peacocks. Kids should note the ever-present purple skateboard throughout that whimsically provides rides for these creatures along the way. Is the lad deliberately being mischievous by offering water to the animals because he wants to use it up and end the day early or because he genuinely is concerned about the animals’ welfare and doesn’t realize the repercussions of his actions? It’s magical, right?

Then there’s Jesús’s hard labor on such a hot day. Readers see him frequently splash water on his face to cool off. It is fun watching what Jesús gets up to because of Kinkz’s childlike, loose-lined art, created using multimedia including pencil, ink, watercolor, gouache, crayons, and queso. In addition to the magical water jug, I always find it magical when the art and prose pair so harmoniously as they do here.

When eventually Jesús tells Papá that the jug is empty, Papá explains that the jug is not really magical and there are many more stops before they can go home. Beyond surprised at this revelation, the little boy worries he’ll be fired, unaware of the simple solution – request water at the next stop. Once reality sets in, the father and son team must make tracks to finish up all the while having laughs along the way. Now Jesús can appreciate that “Time and water are precious. We don’t want to waste them.” The sweet love between father and son is palpable on every page, and the gentle life lesson conveyed makes this a “read again” story. Don’t miss the comical endpapers too! Also available in Spanish – El Barrilito Mágico de Papá. • Reviewed by Ronna Mandel.

 

Ramen for Everyone cover boy with bowl of ramenRAMEN FOR EVERYONE
Written by Patricia Tanumihardja
Illustrated by Shiho Pate
(Atheneum BYR; $18.99; Ages 4-8)

A March/April 2023 Indie Next Pick
A Junior Library Guild Selection

Another great father/son bonding book is Patricia Tanumihardja’s Ramen For Everyone with illustrations rendered in sumi ink, pencil, and digital media by Shiho Pate. The main character, Hiro, has been studying Dad’s technique of cooking the perfect bowl of ramen every Sunday night for as long as he can remember. But when his seventh birthday arrives, Hiro decides he’s ready to make ramen for the family.

With illustrations of Dad chopping the meat, seasoning the broth, and cutting the vegetables it’s hard not to want to run out and get a bowl of ramen—or better yet make it yourself. Let’s make ramen! Hiro says standing beside Dad at the cooking block. Yes, chef! Dad responds with his arms poised straight by his side. The roles have now been reversed! Hiro’s hair is pulled back in a grey cap as he Thwacks, Thumps, and Bumps his way into the kitchen attempting to make the noodles soft and springy. You got this! His dad says supporting him from the side.

Mom, sister Mia, Dad, and dog Sushi watch as the eggs slip through Hiro’s fingers and the pork falls apart. Shiho Pate perfectly depicts anger on Hiro’s face as Dinner is ruined! He throws the food in the trash. Dad sits crossed-legged on the kitchen floor with his hand on Hiro’s head. It isn’t perfect like yours, Hiro says. Ramen doesn’t have to be perfect, Dad replies.

Hiro and Dad return to the kitchen together to create a meal that both Mom and Mia will enjoy. Cheesy ramen for Mom, Asian Pears for Mia, and for Dad, who loves Hawaiian pizza, pieces of pineapple are a delight in his bowl.

The back matter tells how Ramen is a popular Japanese noodle of Chinese origin and how it has been popularized over the last few years in the United States. Tanumihardja also lists Kitchen Rules telling kids that cooking is fun but you need to wash your hands. Great cooking also takes time. Reading Ramen for Everyone together is a terrific way to get a father and son (or daughter) into the kitchen to create dishes. An Easy Miso Ramen recipe is included and introduces new dishes to add to the family menu. So, if you don’t feel like cooking, you can always bring in ramen bowls this Father’s Day.
• Reviewed by Ronda Einbinder.

 

When Daddy Tucks Me In cover girl hugging father WHEN DADDY TUCKS ME IN
Written by Sacha Cotter
Illustrated by Josh Morgan
(Sourcebooks Jabberwocky; $18.99, Ages 4+)

The little girl narrator of this charming picture book rushes out of bed to greet her daddy after he returns home from his medical job that involves working late. Early on we’re clued into the important role of keys in this imaginative story when the girl notes the “jingle, jangle, jingle in the lock of our door.”

From here on in, readers are treated to a slew of fun-sounding, made-up words such as when the little girl proclaims her dad is the “… best tucker-in-er-er in the whole wide world.” On top of that, onomatopeia is peppered throughout the story adding to its read-aloud appeal. We quickly realize how Dad’s packed keychain unlocks the heart of this tale as the narrator inquires about what each key is used for. Is she stalling for time with her dad? It doesn’t matter because we are curious too!

The lumpy, bumpy key leads to Dad’s yarn about a fantastical Zippenburger that takes him zippling off to work with a “Zippeny, zappeny, zippen …” A tiny key unlocks a treasure chest that’s hidden away and only he can find using his
“pirate’s map.” Morgan has filled every spread with whimsical details that one look will not suffice. His art, created in Adobe Photoshop using digital painting and found textures, will hold your child’s attention and delight them. In this particular illustration, there’s a swinging monkey in a pearl necklace, a chest filled with gold, a spider, a snake, and even the little girl’s cat who manages to insert himself into every humorous scene. As a cookie lover, my favorite key is the curly, curvy one that opens the door at her dad’s workplace to a cookie-making machine and conveyor belt. There Dad sits stuffing his face. With each key’s purpose conjuring up wild tales such as the one to a corral where Dad’s woolly mammoth Stanley lives or the one that opens a rocket so Dad can collect space noodles, threads of your child’s dreams are being sewn.

As the story and your child wind down, Cotter brings readers back to the key that started us off, the simple metal one that opens the front door to the narrator’s house and to her! What a satisfying way to end When Daddy Tucks Me In and send your little one off to sleep. • Reviewed by Ronna Mandel.

 

Daddy Dressed Me cover girl hugging dad who sewsDADDY DRESSED ME
Written by Michael Gardner and Ava Gardner
Illustrated by Nadia Fisher
(Aladdin BYR; $18.99; Ages 4-8)

Daddy Dressed Me is co-written by thirty-nine-year-old fashion blogger, Michael Gardner, and his confident and thoughtful young daughter, Ava Gardner, who loves pink, getting manicures, and modeling her dad’s unique creations. That alone should fill your heart and give you a reason to read this book with your own child.

The digitally rendered illustrations by Nadia Fisher open to Dad and Ava back to back with Dad wearing an apron for cooking, standing next to a toolbox for building, and cans of paint on the floor for decorating. He’s good at making things.

We see him cooking and painting a mural but what Daddy was best at was sewing. He makes dresses for Ava every year for the holidays and a dress for the Daddy-Daughter dance. When Daddy drops Ava off for Kindergarten, Ava chooses to make a picture frame for Daddy during arts and crafts. But when Miss Sydney announces that everyone should dress in their best clothes for Move Up Day (saying goodbye to Kindergarten and hello to first grade) Ava begins to worry. Would they still make crafts? What about story time?

During dinner, Daddy asks Ava how school was and she tells him about Move Up Day and that she is worried about reciting a poem. Maybe I can make you a special dress, Daddy suggests to Ava who melts into his hug. We see drawings of different dress choices for Ava to choose from. Together they go to the store to find the perfect fabric and Ava finds one that a real princess would wear. She draws a picture of her dream dress. Daddy is a bit worried that it may be complicated but he agrees. Together they practice the poem while Ava helps Daddy with the dress. Ava’s words flowed with more confidence and Daddy’s sewing machine began to whir faster than ever before. When Miss Sydney called Ava’s name she recited the poem perfectly wrapped in the dress that Daddy designed.

The back matter explains the story behind the story of how Michael Gardner used creativity as a way to process his internal struggles. He says, “God turned my pain into power.” Gardner dedicates this book to the memory of his firstborn daughter, Madison-Sole, whose blessed memory he honors in all that he does. This story beautifully highlights what determination, patience, and love can do. • Reviewed by Ronda Einbinder.

 

SOON TO BE RELEASED:

The Coolest Beard cover boy helping dad shaveTHE COOLEST BEARD
Written by Betty Tekle
Illustrated by Nicholas Alexander
(Albert Whitman; $18.99; Ages 4-8, Preorder now, releasing 6/22)

Tenderness and empathy abound in storyteller Betty Tekle’s picture book The Coolest Beard, in which a boy goes with his father to the barbershop and sees the kindness that is shown between his dad and the men who talk about ‘grown folks’ business while getting haircuts and beard trims.

The adults are seated talking on a couch, a cane leaning on Mr. Williams’ knee, but when young Isaac asks, when I grow a beard, I can talk and listen to grown folks’ business? His dad responds, By the time you get a beard, you’ll be one of the grown folks. Nicolas Alexander’s colorful detailed drawings illustrate the Black cultural tradition of the barbershop as a community and family space. And his drawings of the father’s long furry beard are the envy of young Isaac. Some of my favorite illustrations are the humorous spot art pictures of Isaac imagining himself with a beard.

Isaac does not have the patience to wait for a beard to grow, so he rubs Dad’s beard oil all over his face to speed up the process. The adorable illustrations of father and son in the bathroom with Dad rubbing the oil on his beard are made sweeter when we see Isaac doing the same.

Week 1: Nothing yet; Week 2: Still nothing. His cute little dog is intently staring at him and waiting for the beard to grow. By the time he reaches Week 6, Dad’s beard oil has been used up and he wonders if olive oil may do the trick.

When Saturday morning barbershop time comes around, Isaac and his doggy see that his face is as soft and empty as the day before. Isaac feels awful about using up the beard oil and confesses to Mom and Dad. Dad says that going with him to the barbershop will make him feel better.

That’s when Cliff the barber has a plan and places Isaac in the barber chair. When Isaac opens his eyes, he sees that Cliff has rubbed shaving cream all over his cheeks and chin resembling Santa Claus. Now that he has his version of a beard, Isaac is invited over to talk with the grown folks learning that Mr. Williams has broken his hip and that Dad has offered to run errands for him. Other guys offer to help as well. I didn’t realize that grown folks’ business is just adults helping each other, Isaac thinks when Dad offers Mr. Williams money to pay his bills since he’s unable to work. Isaac now sees that it’s not just the beard that makes his dad cool, but his care and generosity toward his friends.

Though not out yet, The Coolest Beard celebrates this unique aspect of fatherhood while honoring the men in children’s lives who teach their kids about acts of loving-kindness. Preorder today. • Reviewed by Ronda Einbinder.

 

MORE RECOMMENDED READS FOR FATHER’S DAY

Daddy and Me cover multiple dads kidsDADDY AND ME
Written by Gary Urda
Illustrated by Rosie Butcher
(Little Bee Books; $8.99, Ages 0-3)

 

 

 

A Bed of Stars cover dad son in truck stargazingA BED OF STARS
Written and illustrated by Jessica Love
(Candlewick Press; $18.99, Ages 4-8)

 

 

 

How To Catch a Daddysaurus cover assorted toolsHOW TO CATCH A DADDYSAURUS
Written by Alice Walstead
Illustrated by Andy Elkerton
(Sourcebooks Wonderland; $10.99, Ages 4-8)

 

 

 

Daddy & Me Side by Side cover father son walking in woodsDADDY & ME, SIDE BY SIDE
Written by Pierce Freelon and Nadia Fisher 
Illustrated by Nadia Fisher
(Little, Brown BYR; $18.99, Ages 4-8)

 

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Best Easter Books for Children

 

 

BEST EASTER BOOKS FOR CHILDREN

~ A ROUNDUP ~

 

 

 

 Pick a Perfect Egg cover chicks bunnies easter eggsPICK A PERFECT EGG
Written by Patricia Toht
Illustrated by Jarvis
(Candlewick; $17.99, Ages 3-7)

The popular duo, Patricia Toht and Jarvis continues their “Pick a” series with Pick a Perfect Egg. First, of course, you need an egg and the book starts, logically, with a chicken: “Pick a perfect egg with care— / choose a white one nestled there.” We feel the thought placed in each step by the mother and daughter until their eggs are ready for the big day. At that moment, I like how the story steps away and leads us to other kinds of eggs found during the egg hunt but then returns to the star of the show: their dyed eggs.

Toht’s rhyme is masterfully crafted with fun and lively sounds but also enough variation to add interest to the repetition. The illustrations by Jarvis have the soft edges of spring coupled with a cheerful color scheme. This is one of my favorite new Easter books because it showcases how much egg-coloring means to kids. I could read this book again and again.
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Hope is a Hop girl in garden with bunnyHOPE IS A HOP
Written by Katrina Moore

Illustrated by Melissa Iwai
(Dial BYR; $18.99, Ages 3-7) 

In Katrina Moore’s picture book, Hope Is a Hop, Eva lovingly plants seeds and tends to her garden, but—intruder alert!—she’s not able to reap what she sowed. We learn what hope can be: “a hum and a song and a pat / a battle with a bunny / a worn-in straw hat.” The rhyming couplets capture what a garden means to a child and how things may not always be as they seem.

In a clever, layered plot, the bunny’s and family’s stories unfold. Melissa Iwai’s illustrations beautifully depict spring in all its glory; they work perfectly with the spare text, saying so much through the captivating art. An ideal book for a gardener, animal lover, or a family expecting a baby. Because of the darling, mischievous bunny, this book also works at Easter time.

 

Hot Cross Bunny cover of cross blue bunny and birdTHE HOT CROSS BUNNY
Written by Carys Bexington
Illustrated by Mark Chambers
(Happy Yak/Quarto; $18.99, Ages 3-6)

If you’re looking for an Easter book that’s delightfully different, Carys Bexington’s The Hot Cross Bunny hits the mark. Steve (a bunny) wants to win the annual Golden Egg Cup contest, but, sadly, he hasn’t grown a chocolate egg all year. With a little ingenuity—and a tossing aside of the instructions—he succeeds. Kind of. Well, maybe not. You’ll have to read the book to find out.

Mark Chambers’s illustrations take the puns and funny rhyming lines to the next level. Steve the bunny’s expressions are delightful and his chocolate eggs are certainly eggsceptional. Be sure to continue on past what seems to be the last page to see why I want one of Steve’s eggs in my Easter basket this year!

• Reviewed by Christine Van Zandt (www.ChristineVanZandt.com), Write for Success (www.WriteforSuccessEditing.com), @ChristineVZ and @WFSediting, Christine@WriteforSuccessEditing.com
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Children’s Picture Book Review – I Hear You, Forest

 

 

I HEAR YOU, FOREST

Written by Kallie George

Illustrated by Carmen Mok

(Greystone Kids; $17.95; Ages 3-7)

 

I Hear You Forest cover

 

When a child walks through the forest and hears its majestic sounds, we’re reminded by author Kallie George that the forest needs to be heard in I Hear You, Forest, with breathtaking illustrations by Carmen Mok .

As a new mom, George knows the importance of helping babies and toddlers juggle their emotions. And the simple words, “I hear you” let them know they are heard and they are respected. The story takes the reader on a walk, guided by the child protagonist, stopping to hear what the forest has to say while feeling George’s love of nature in the gentle prose. The full-page green palette, surrounded by yellow flowers and tiny birds, serenades the dark-haired girl taking time to metaphorically stop and smell the roses (although there are no roses just tall trees and happy wildlife).

 

I Hear You Forest int art1
Interior spread from I Hear You, Forest written by Kallie George and illustrated by Carmen Mok, Greystone Kids ©2021.

 

The young girl in the red jumpsuit lays motionless on the forest ground with yellow birds flying overhead, and white rabbits hopping happily across the grass. “Creak, creak. I hear you, Trees, stretching skyward. Are you trying to tickle clouds?”

 

I Hear You Forest int art2
Interior spread from I Hear You, Forest written by Kallie George and illustrated by Carmen Mok, Greystone Kids ©2021.

 

The words are simple but the message is strong, as Mok’s art shows her stopping to notice the nature around her. She is living in the present moment. Such a wonderful message to learn at a young age. What child hasn’t done this on a sunny day? Peaking behind the green leaves, the girl spies a nest with eggs. “So that’s where Robin hides her eggs.”

Interacting with her new forest friends, the child holds a blinking contest with a frog and sings along with the soft blue stream. Mok’s illustrations bring the reader into the story as if they too were sitting on a forest floor. Her face takes in the smells of nature standing under a squirrel-packed tree limb. “Nibble, nibble. I hear you, Squirrels, tasting treasures. Is it time to stop and snack?”

Through each lush and atmospheric page turn, we meet new animals and feel the empathy the child experiences for the beauty and marvel that surrounds her. Holding her mother’s hand, the girl simply says “I (heart) you, Forest.” As she turns, she witnesses the animals watching them walk away.

Sitting in my backyard as I write, listening to the birds singing nearby, I feel just what the young girl felt. It’s powerful, rewarding, and relaxing, too. I encourage parents to read this book to their children and then take them on a stroll through their local park or forest. You’ll truly enjoy the outdoors when you stop, listen and learn. I’m pleased to know this is the first in a series of books and look forward to reading the other books that follow because “The forest has lots to say … if you listen.” 

  • Reviewed by Ronda Einbinder

 

 

#nature #interconnectedness #communication #empathy #imagination #awareness

 

 

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Picture Book Review – Rectangle Time

RECTANGLE TIME

Written by Pamela Paul

Illustrated by Becky Cameron

(Philomel Books; $17.99, Ages 4-8)

 

 

Rectangle Time cover

 

 

Tell me there’s a story about cats and books and I’m in! New York Times Book Review editor Pamela Paul’s picture book, Rectangle Time, unfolds from the family’s calico cat’s perspective. Through humor and heartwarming moments, the cat and boy grow from lap reading to independent reading—the calico certainly has its opinions about which type it prefers. “Watch carefully: See how the man and the boy hold the rectangle together? That means they each have one hand free for me.”

 

Rectangle Time int1
Interior spread from Rectangle Time written by Pamela Paul and illustrated by Becky Cameron, Philomel Books ©2021.

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As a parent, I appreciate the well-depicted bittersweet moments of a child’s independence as well as the clever commentary from the cat. “Look at the poor little guy. He’s just . . . staring at the rectangle,” the cat thinks when the boy picks up a book on his own. As any cat owner knows, it’s all about the cat; this comes through strongly in the calico’s continued need to be the center of attention.

 

Rectangle Time int2
Interior spread from Rectangle Time written by Pamela Paul and illustrated by Becky Cameron, Philomel Books ©2021.

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Becky Cameron’s art will make you laugh as she captures feline moods from furry contentment to perplexed then miffed. The secret second cover (look under the book jacket) echoes the satisfying ending.

 

 

Click here to read a review of another cat picture book.

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Kids Board Book Review – I Miss Your Sunny Smile

I MISS YOUR SUNNY SMILE

By Deb Adamson

Illustrated by Anne Zimanski

(Blue Manatee Press; $7.99, Ages 0-3)

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IMissYourSunnySmile cover

 

 

Find out what to do when little ones lose their smile in I Miss Your Sunny Smile.

 

Deb Adamson’s heartwarming 14-page board book, I Miss Your Sunny Smile, invites readers to search for a young boy’s lost smile. Mama helps, hoping to restore his cheer. Could it have dropped or rolled away? What can they do to get it back?

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IMissYourSunnySmile int2
Interior art from I Miss Your Sunny Smile written by Deb Adamson and illustrated by Anne Zimanski, Blue Manatee Press ©2021.

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Written in rhyme, this sweet board book shows that sadness is a normal part of life. Warm and playful illustrations by Anne Zimanksi encourage a bright mood and provide soothing comfort. And let’s not forget the ending, sure to delight and put a smile on any young child’s face.

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Click here or here to order a copy of the book today.

Click here to read another review by Moni.

 

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Picture Book Review – A Gift for Amma

A GIFT FOR AMMA:

Market Day in India

Written by Meera Sriram

Illustrated by Mariona Cabassa

(Barefoot Books; HC $16.99,
PB English or Spanish $8.99, Ages 4-9)

 

 

 

Starred Reviews – Foreword Reviews, School Library Journal

Few picture books will trigger your wanderlust more than the beautiful A Gift for Amma: Market Day in India, written by Meera Sriram and Illustrated by Mariona Cabassa. The story follows a young girl as she shops at an outdoor Indian market to find a gift for Amma—or Mother. But really, it is a celebration of color, the senses, and love.

 

2020 06 Gift for Amma Interior
Interior spread from A Gift for Amma written by Meera Sriram and illustrated by Mariona Cabassa, Barefoot Books ©2020

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Each spread introduces readers to not just the various items in the market, but to a vibrant color palette of dizzying loveliness. Pink is not just pink. It is lotus pink, like the flowers and sweet treats the girl considers buying for Amma. Likewise, green becomes peacock green, and orange become saffron orange. But, in such a poly-chromatic world, how can a gift of any one color ever suffice? This is the question the at heart of the story—and it is such a good one that you might suddenly look at your black and white wardrobe and ask yourself: What was I thinking?
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AGiftForAmma Interior lotuspink small
Interior spread from A Gift for Amma written by Meera Sriram and illustrated by Mariona Cabassa, Barefoot Books ©2020

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Readers will also love the final two spreads, which provide more information about not just the merchandise available at the outdoor markets of Southern India, but about the history of outdoor markets themselves.

A Gift for Amma is the perfect antidote for these days of remote learning and armchair traveling. It will give you hope. There is still so much waiting for us in the days ahead. And—if we are lucky—they will be very colorful.

 

Click here to order a copy of A Gift for Amma.

Disclosure: Good Reads With Ronna is now a Bookshop.org affiliate and will make a small commission from the books sold via this site at no extra cost to you. If you’d like to help support this blog, its team of kidlit reviewers as well as independent bookshops nationwide, please consider purchasing your books from Bookshop.org using our affiliate links above (or below). Thanks!

Recommended Reads for the Week of 10/19/20

 

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Kids Board Book Review – I Yoga You

I YOGA YOU

Written and illustrated by Genevieve Santos

(Little Simon; $8.99, Ages 1 and up)

 

I Yoga You book cover

 

Author and illustrator Genevieve Santos expresses parental love through words and drawings of yoga (asana) poses for young children, while teaching kids techniques to calm the body and mind in the padded board book, I Yoga You.

“I love you in the morning when you salute the sun,” the mother says to her child as she stands next to the window demonstrating the asana pose known as Sun Salutation. The young girl, still lying in bed, reaches her arms towards the sun alongside her stuffed bear who is doing the same.

Turning the page, we find mothers with sons and fathers with daughters all showing their love for their children. “I love you flying through the sky—fearless, strong, and proud,” says the father with the long, scruffy red beard while holding his red haired daughter and her stuffed pig over his head. Her hands are outstretched like superwoman (Superman/Superwoman pose).

 

int art I Yoga You
Interior illustration from I Yoga You written and illustrated by Genevieve Santos, Little Simon ©2019.

 

With I Yoga You, youngsters learn how to let out their anger when they experience a bad feeling, but also learn that mom and dad will still always love them. Santos shows the black shadow of a roaring lion, while a mom hugs her angry son teaching the reader about the benefits of Lion’s Breath. Mom’s eyes are closed while holding her screaming child, suggesting she too is practicing deep breathing.

 

int art I Yoga You lionroar
Interior illustration from I Yoga You written and illustrated by Genevieve Santos, Little Simon ©2019.

 

Page after page depicts a new pose with another parent’s message of love. Parents will enjoy reading this book to their children before bedtime or when mindfulness and relaxation are needed. Children will learn at an early age the benefits of these asana poses, while being reminded just how much they are loved and how they can, in turn, can return the love. I Yoga You is also a fun read for preschool and kindergarten teachers looking for an activity to calm their classrooms during the hectic holiday season. And teachers can be reminded that these poses can also be done during their breaks. This recommended 26 page interactive book is durable so it can be read and re-read for Valentine’s Day or all year long. Namaste.

  • Reviewed by Ronda Einbinder
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Kids Book Reviews – Christmas Board Books Roundup 2019

CHRISTMAS BOARD BOOKS

– A Roundup –

 

Merry Christmas Transparent Clip Art

 

 

christmas puppy book coverCHRISTMAS PUPPY:
A Wag My Tail Book
By Salina Yoon
(Little Simon; $7.99, All Ages)

The 12-page, pull-the-tab board book, Christmas Puppy, begs to be read and enjoyed by parents and youngsters alike. Who can resist a furry tail that either parents or children can pull each time there’s a puppy pal sound effect?

Puppy knows there’s a gift waiting for him under the tree, but which one will it be? Each time he thinks he’s found it, that particular present is actually intended for either Mouse, Hamster or Cat. Readers can imitate the accompanying animal squeaks, chirps and meows while pulling the wagging tail tab to their hearts’ content. Yoon’s sweet story with its four adorable animals concludes with Puppy finding and unwrapping his special gift. Have fun with Puppy and friends and enjoy a wag-ful Christmas.

grandmas christmas wish coverGRANDMA’S CHRISTMAS WISH
Written by Helen Foster James
Illustrated by Petra Brown
(Sleeping Bear Press; $8.99, Ages 0-4)

Now available in board book, Grandma’s Christmas Wish celebrates the unique bond between a grandmother bunny and her grandbunny. It’s a gentle reminder that multi-generational relationships mean so much and can bring such joy.

I love how this grandma bunny expresses herself so beautifully in her rhyming couplets. As the pair frolic in the burrow and the snow covered woods, Grandma shares her wishes which are so much more than material ones. Instead they’re about spending time together and her feeling of unconditional love for her grandbunny. “But, you with your grin and all of your charms, you’re my best present, just wrapped in my arms.” Be prepared to smile with every lovely page turn in this heartwarming story just perfect for any little one’s first Christmas.

christmas is awesome coverCHRISTMAS IS AWESOME!
A Hello!Lucky Book

Written by Sabrina Moyle
Illustrated by Eunice Moyle
(Abrams Appleseed; $7.99, Ages 0-3)

The merry, colorful illustrations and simple rhyming text of Christmas is Awesome! convey exactly what children think of when describing Christmas. “… Twinkling Lights, Silent Nights, Busy Elves, Jingle Bells!” Joy jumps off every page of this charming new board book from the sisters who founded Hello!Lucky, “the award-winning letterpress greeting card and design studio committed to using creativity to spread joy, fun, and kindness.” They succeed.

In addition to the festive feel of this 24-page board book, there are many laughs in store. Inside readers will find humorous spreads—I’m partial to the “Ugly Sweaters” one—that are study-worthy to see what surprises have been included. For example, a lump of coal gets up to all sorts of antics and experiences all sorts of emotions in every spread. I discovered new things with every read and children will enjoy doing the same. Kids will love the variety of animals featured throughout the book such as an elephant, a mole, a penguin, a cat, a squirrel, a dog, a mouse and lots more. Easy to memorize, this terrific read-aloud is recommended for little ones who like the fun and funny side of Christmas.

santas cookie is missing cvrSANTA’S COOKIE IS MISSING!
Written by Chris Ayala-Kronos
Illustrated by Anne Passchier
(HMH Books; $8.99, Ages 0-3)

Die-cut board books are always popular with toddlers and Santa’s Cookie is Missing! is no exception. I like the premise of this story; after a family’s Christmas Even dinner has ended, the narrator (a young girl) notices that the cookie usually saved for Santa has disappeared. The child sets off to solve the mystery first at home, then outdoors, and then inside again.

Every new die-cut reveals something related to the narrator’s search in a circle shape that will hopefully lead to the missing snack. Whether it’s a plate, a Christmas tree ornament, a snowball, the hollow of an old oak tree or even a mug of hot cocoa, there are lots of places to look and several possible suspects. Make note of the cat and dog in the artwork and see if your kids can anticipate who might be the culprit. I’ll admit I was surprised, but maybe that’s because I was too busy checking out all the pretty die-cuts. The tree-ornament and the present with their respective sparkly and shiny designs were my faves. What will be your youngsters’ faves? Don’t miss picking up a copy of this book to gift or to enjoy at home.

The little winter book of gnomes cvrTHE LITTLE WINTER BOOK OF GNOMES
By Kirsten Sevig
(The Countryman Press; $12.95; All Ages)

This compact book (not really a board book, but the same size) makes a wonderful gift to bring to family and friends for the holiday season. It’s packed with playful gnomes in watercolor illustrations coupled with proverbs inspired by author illustrator Sevig’s Norwegian family and her childhood. Though raised in America, Sevig explains that she and her sister were brought up “in the only Norwegian speaking household on the block.” Clearly her fond memories have influenced the warm upbeat tone of this collection.

Early on, Sevig points out how the meaning of the word gnome actually has a double meaning that’s depicted in every illustration. Not only is a gnome a small woodland creature, it’s also a “wise, pithy saying” and The Little Winter Book of Gnomes is filled with them. I knew the majority of the sayings, but the way they’re lovingly paired with assorted gnomes is the true pleasure that’s to be taken away from any reading. Read just several at a time or sit back, have a cup of warm tea and delight in all 128 cheerful pages. Some noteworthy gnomes include “A tree with strong roots laughs at the storm,” “A warm drink is a hug in a mug,” and “Don’t waste time looking back. You aren’t going that way.” Marzipan and Rice Cream with Berry Sauce are just a few of the recipes that are also included, making this book a go-to read when the weather turns cold and party plans get underway.

  • Reviewed by Ronna Mandel

Have you read IF ANIMALS CELEBRATED CHRISTMAS by Ann Whitford Paul?
Illustrated by David Walker, Paul’s book is now out in board book format.
Read my review of the picture book from last year here.

Looking for more Christmas book reviews? Click here.

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Inspired by a True Tale – The Dam by David Almond

THE DAM
Written by David Almond
Illustrated by Levi Pinfold
(Candlewick Studio; $17.99, Ages: 5-9)

Starred Review – Kirkus, Publishers Weekly

 

cover illustration from The Dam by David Almond with art by Levi Pinfold


Poignant words and haunting illustrations tell this tale based on a true story of love, loss, and rebirth in The Dam written by David Almond and illustrated by Levi Pinfold.

“He woke her early. ‘Bring your fiddle,’” a father tells his daughter. Through these sparse words, the book opens with an immediate sense of urgency. A dam under construction will soon flood a valley cherished by Kathryn and her father. Once home to beloved musician friends, this valley will forever “be gone” and “washed away.” Pinfold’s illustrations echo the somber tone in a palette of gray, green, and white. While his “snapshot” pictures highlight samples of the delicate flora and fauna that will be lost, his double page spreads bring a bigger perspective to the vastness of the English countryside—the vastness of the loss and of the task at hand.

 

interior spread by Levi Pinfold from The Dam by David Almond
THE DAM. Text copyright © 2018 by David Almond. Illustrations copyright © 2018 by Levi Pinfold. Reproduced by permission of the publisher, Candlewick Press, Somerville, MA on behalf of Walker Books, London.

 

“‘Take no notice. There’s no danger,’” Kathryn’s father tells her. Tearing off boards on the abandoned houses they once gathered in to dance and sing, Kathryn’s father asks her to enter the rooms and play her fiddle. I couldn’t help but pause after reading these lines in the book. No danger? Had this story taken place in America, such an area would be visibly marked off with miles of flourescent yellow “CAUTION” tape and multiple “NO TRESPASSING” signs. Though the illustrations in the book show no such signage, it’s quite possible the characters’ presence in the valley was to some degree illegal. Though whatever physical danger there may have been, they faced an even greater one: the danger of the grieving process.

I compare tearing off boards from house to house to tearing off the bandage on a deep wound, acknowledging its pain, and being present with the discomfort. Kathryn plays and “Daddy sing[s],” lifting spirits “gone and … still to come” up and out of the houses and setting them free to become part of the landscape—the earth, the sky, the animals, and people. What a profound mystery of the human spirit, that we can find the safety of healing only by taking the risk to be vulnerable. Father teaches daughter there really is no danger when we grieve fully and wholeheartedly.

 

interior spread from The Dam by David Almond with art by Levi Pinfold
THE DAM. Text copyright © 2018 by David Almond. Illustrations copyright © 2018 by Levi Pinfold. Reproduced by permission of the publisher, Candlewick Press, Somerville, MA on behalf of Walker Books, London.

 

“The lake is beautiful” the author tells us, reflecting on how Kathryn and her father embrace the new creation. And just as before, Pinfold’s illustrations give us both detailed and wide-angled views of the landscape. Peaceful blues, gentle greens, and flowy whites restore what was once lost. Even the movement of the little fish mimic the dance of the spirits. Though the valley is gone, music continues to be celebrated.

Both multi-award winners, Almond and Pinfold complement each other beautifully. I strongly recommend the book to caregivers and educators alike, especially as an introduction to issues of change and loss for younger elementary-age children and to issues of death and bereavement for older ones.

  • Reviewed by Armineh Manookian

Read a review of another David Almond book here.
Read another review by Armineh here.

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What We’re Reading for Mother’s Day 2018

BEST BOOKS FOR MOTHER’S DAY 2018
A ROUNDUP

 

 

Happy Mother's Day pink roses bouquet image

 

How do you celebrate Mother’s Day? With our recommendations for the best new Mother’s Day books around! And, whatever you may do, wherever you may go, take some time to read together with your children at home, in a park, on a train, at a bookstore or in a library. Books make memorable gifts and, with an added personal message, will be cherished for years to come.

 

A Heart Just Like My Mother's cover illustrationA Heart Just Like My Mother’s
Written by Lela Nargi
Illustrated by Valeria Cis
(Kar-Ben; $17.99 Hardcover, $7.99 Paperback, Ages 3-8)

In A Heart Just Like My Mother’s, when Anna, who loves and admires her mother is inspired to help a homeless man by saving up her Tzedakah money, she realizes she and her mom share something in common—a big heart. This lovely picture book is a wonderful way to explain the Jewish tradition of performing an act Tzedakah which Nargi defines not so much as charity but doing the right thing by helping others. But it’s also the story of a little girl who starts out thinking she could never be as creative, funny or caring as her mother until she realizes what she has to offer. By collecting Tzedakah money and providing food for the homeless man, Anna’s selfless act of kindness brings her closer to her mother and proves to herself that she too has qualities worth being proud of. I love Cis’s illustrations too. There’s a warm, folksy feeling about them that adds to the positive vibe that emanates from the pages making A Heart Just Like My Mother’s such an enjoyable read.

Forever or a Day cover illustration by Susan JacobyForever or a Day
Written and illustrated by Sarah Jacoby
(Chronicle Books; $17.99, Ages 3-5)

With its starred reviews from both School Library Journal and Publishers Weekly, Forever or a Day by Sarah Jacoby will make a thoughtful gift this holiday for those seeking something at once out of the ordinary as well as heartwarming. It conveys its beautiful message with spare yet evocative text and in just 20 pages. At first I thought it was a picture book about the future, but then it dawned on me that it’s about being present and spending time together with loved ones and making meaningful moments now. Adults and children may experience different reactions when reading the book but that’s to be expected. Sophie Blackall, Caldecott Medal-winning and New York Times–bestselling illustrator of Finding Winnie, says it best: “Sarah Jacoby’s ethereal exploration of time rushes like a passing train, shimmers like a setting sun and allows us, just for a moment, to appreciate the beauty of standing still.” Prepare to be moved by the compelling art that complements the lyrical language of Forever or a Day.

I've Loved You Since Forever cover illustrationI’ve Loved You Since Forever
Written by Hoda Kotb
Illustrated by Suzie Mason
(HarperCollins BYR; $18.99, Ages 4-8)

Precious pairings of mothers and and animal babies from bluebirds and bunnies to otters and owls fill the pages of Today show co-host Hoda Kotb’s debut picture book, I’ve Loved You Since Forever. Kotb adopted her daughter, Haley Joy, in February 2017 and her happiness at becoming a mother is infectious and evident throughout this delightful picture book. Gentle rhyme, a repeated refrain (there was you … and there was me), a rewarding wrap up and exuberant illustrations all work wonderfully together. I’d pick up I’ve Loved You Since Forever for any new parent on your holiday list. In addition to Kotb’s lovely language, there’s a sense of warmth and closeness from the special bond of parenthood depicted in Mason’s tender scenarios. Whether or not you’re an adoptive parent, I’m sure these lines will resonate with you as they did with me: Before otters swam together/and rivers reached the sea/there was you and there was me/waiting for the day our stars would cross/and you and I turned into we. Awww!

American Mom: A Celebration of Motherhood in Pop Culture
by Meredith Hale
(Sterling Publishing; $19.95)

In 176 color pages and 12 clever chapters, author Hale deftly delves into the world of motherhood from various perspectives that readers will find fascinating. The introduction says the book “explores the changing role of motherhood through the images and shared cultural moments that have captured it best: magazines, advertisements, greeting cards, television shows, movies, songs, and other pop culture ephemera.” Choose a chapter at a time because this comprehensive and enlightening book is meant to be savored slowly (like a 1950s TV mom’s best casserole) and cannot be read in one or even two sittings. I love the breadth of the material that’s been included and am partial to the earlier chapters that cover motherhood in the eras before I was born including The Nineteenth Century, The Pre-War Years, World War I, The Roaring Twenties, The Great Depression, World War II, The 1950s (although note that American Mom does go all the way to present day 21st century). I learned, for example, that between “1885 and 1905, there were around eleven thousand magazines and periodicals published in the United States—and about 88 percent of the subscribers were women,” that Betty Crocker was a fictional character, that Eleanor Roosevelt “broadened the role” of first lady and that on I Love Lucy they couldn’t say the word pregnant on the show! Through Hale’s insightful lens on motherhood, we’re taken on an entertaining jaunt through fashion, food, first ladies, feminism, photography, film and literature that pays tribute to the ever changing role of mothers in American life and touches on aspects of this expansive topic in ways that will interest every reader, male or female.

If you’re looking for a fun, original board book for Mother’s Day, look no further than
From Mother to Mother
Written and illustrated by Emilie Vast
Translated from French by Julia Cormier
(Charlesbridge; $7.99, Ages 0-3)
Simple in concept, but rich in design elements, this 14-page board book is perfect for little ones who adore the pull-apart Matryoshka dolls. Every other page takes a child back several generations of a mother’s mother’s mother’s mother who in turn gave birth to a child eventually bringing the reader to the present. “And not long ago, I gave birth to you … my very own child. A mother’s love goes on and on and on.” What a beautiful sentiment to share with a young child while cuddling them close and showing them all the different colored pages, each with unique and nature-inspired artwork. There’s also a version for dads!

  • Reviewed by Ronna Mandel

Read our Mother’s Day recommendations from 2017 here.

Read Cathy Ballou Mealey’s review of Love, Mama here.

 

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Children’s Books for Mother’s Day 2017

BEST CHILDREN’S BOOKS FOR MOTHER’S DAY
– A ROUNDUP –

 

Mama’s KissesMama's Kisses cover art
Written by Kate McMullan
Illustrated by Tao Nyeu
(Dial BYR; $16.99, Ages 3-5)

With starred reviews from both Publishers Weekly and Booklist, Mama’s Kisses is sure to be an in-demand picture book for many Mother’s Days to come. McMullan has written a sweet ode to the unwavering devotion and patience of moms, in this case, rainforest moms. The moon is on the rise and four mommy animals are on the lookout for their young ones, a baby panda, elephant, orangutan and leopard. As bedtime beckons, the babies engage in a playful game of hide-and-seek that seems so successful until all at once, when the moms are ready, their hiding place is uncovered. But being found means getting kisses, smooches, and hugs galore until tired eyes can no longer remain open. Dreamland is drawing nigh so the baby animals go to sleep soon followed by their tired moms, always close at hand. Conveyed in uncomplicated rhyme and calming rhythm, Mama’s Kisses is a gentle bedtime tale perfect for pre-schoolers. Nyeu’s artwork fills all corners of most every page and, though using only oranges, yellows and blues, she manages to create a subtle softness, warmth and calming mood with just these few well chosen hues.

Love isCover image for Love is by Diane Adams
Written by Diane Adams
Illustrated by Claire Keane
(Chronicle Books; $15.99, Ages 3-5)

Whether it’s for Mother’s Day, Valentine’s Day, Graduation or simply just because, Love is by Diane Adams will make a great gift. Love is a girl and her duckling. Looking after the fuzzy little creature is not unlike a mother caring for her child which is why Love is works on many levels. It’s a story about loving and nurturing something that is dear to you, as well as being about the responsibility involved in such a privilege. “Love is holding something fragile, tiny wings and downy head. Love is noisy midnight feedings, shoebox right beside the bed.” The little girl must also accept that her duckling is growing. She will soon need to allow her pet to move on, fend for itself, find a new home and start a family all its own, all the while knowing that the love she has shared will not be forgotten. This 32 page picture book is a delightful read aloud story with well-paced rhyme and evocative illustrations that, coupled with the meaningful verse, will tug at your heartstrings.

How to Raise a Mom book cover imageHow To Raise a Mom
Written by Jean Reagan
Illustrated by Lee Wildish
(Alfred A. Knopf BYR; $17.99, Ages 4-8)

Another winner from the creators of the How To picture book series, How to Raise a Mom will totally charm moms, dads and kids alike.
“Raising a happy, healthy mom is fun … and important! Are you ready for some tips?” The sibling narrators take readers through their mother’s typical day as part of their instruction guide, and clearly based on the wonderful rearing and love they’re getting from her. After kisses to awaken her, and giving her choices for the day’s outfit, the kids take her to the supermarket and the playground to name a few places while also leaving quiet time for her to get some work done. It’s fantastic to be treated again to Wildish’s whimsical illustrations like those found in the other How To books, full of humorous not-to-miss touches and amusing expressions in every spread. Kids will especially get a kick out of the dog and cat Wildish includes in many scenes. The children also cover playtime, mealtime and finish up the full day with stories and snuggles. I loved how they occasionally mimic just what Mom always says to them such as “Thank you so much, Sweat Pea, for being so patient,” or “Remember to be a good sharer!” There is so much to enjoy in this picture book tribute celebrating moms everywhere.

  • Reviewed by Ronna Mandel

 

More recommended children’s books for Mother’s Day:

Love 
Written and illustrated by Emma Dodd
(Nosy Crow; $12.99, Ages 2-5)

 

 

When I Carried You in My Belly
Written by Thrity Umriar
Illustrated by Ziyue Chen
(Running Press Kids; $16.99, Ages 4-8)

 

 

I Love My Mommy
by Sebastien Braun
(Harper Collins; $7.99, Ages 0-4)

 

 

 

Mommy Snuggles
by Anne Gutman and Georg Hallensleben
(Chronicle Books; $5.99, Ages 1-3)

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Best Children’s Books for Father’s Day Roundup

BEST FATHER’S DAY BOOKS ROUNDUP 2016

 

This year there are more fab Father’s Day books than I’ve ever seen before so I found it rather difficult to narrow down my favorites to just a few.  Here are some of this year’s Father’s Day books I recommend.

 

Hammer And Nails Book CoverHammer and Nails
Written by Josh Bledsoe
Illustrated by Jessica Warrick
(Flashlight Press; $17.95, Ages 4-8)
Josh Bledsoe wrote this story about my husband, or at least he could have because the father in Hammer and Nails (love the wordplay in this title) has a heart of gold with a touch of pink. When his daughter’s playdate plans fall through, it’s dad to the rescue, declaring a daddy daughter day. The pair agree to trade off on completing their lists of activities they’d intended to do before things changed.

If you’ve ever known a father to play dress up with his daughter and even agree to have his hair and nails done, you’ll find that guy here, bonding beautifully with his child. At the same time, the dad asks his daughter to step outside her comfort zone to pound some nails into loose boards on their fence amongst other chores. “Princess, sometimes things you’ve never done end up being fun. Try it.” Everything about Hammer and Nails is fun and upbeat from Warrick’s silly scene of a laundry fight to daddy and daughter getting down with some celebratory moves. With each new page turn, this book will fill young readers with the joy of experiencing quality and creative time spent with a caring dad.

Beard in a BoxBeard_in_a_Box by Bill Cotter Book Cover
Written and illustrated by Bill Cotter
(Knopf BYR: $17.99, Ages 4-8)
Just when you think you’ve seen every kind of Father’s Day book, Beard in a Box arrives! A boy who is convinced the source of his dad’s coolness and power is his beard, decides it’s time to grow one of his own. Only he can’t, despite multiple imaginative efforts. Lo and behold, what should happen to be on TV while this lad is despairing his lack of facial hair – a commercial touting the amazing kid-tested, dad-approved Beard in a Box from SCAM-O. This simple five-step program appeared to work and there were all kinds of bristles available -from the Beatnik to the Biker, the Lincoln to the Santa. What the commercial failed to say was that after following all the required steps, the user had to wait 10-15 years to see results.

When little dude tells his dad how he was ripped off, he notices his father’s beard is gone. Can that mean his dad has lost his coolness? Maybe not with Cotter’s clever examples proving you can’t judge a dad by his beard! The hilarity of Beard in a Box begins with the cover and continues all the way through to the endorsements from satisfied Beard in a Box customers on the back cover: “Don’t take more than the recommended dose. Trust me on this.” – Bigfoot A not-to-miss new read for Father’s Day or any day you need a good laugh or your child yearns for a five o’clock shadow.

Dad SchoolDad_School book cover
Written by Rebecca Van Slyke
Illustrated by Priscilla Burris
(Doubleday BYR; $16.99, Ages 3-7)
Kids go to school to learn their ABCs so when a little boy’s dad says he also went to school, the youngster figures it had to be Dad school. Van Slyke and Burris have teamed up again after last year’s hit, Mom School, to bring readers a glimpse of all the skills a father must acquire to parent successfully.

“At Dad school, I think they learn how to fix boo-boos, how to mend leaky faucets, and how to make huge snacks …” There is a lot of wonderful humor in both the text and artwork that will not be lost on parents reading the story aloud, especially the parts about dads learning how to multi-talk or their failure to learn how to match clothes, brush hair, and clean the bathroom. Dad School is totally entertaining from start to finish, only I wish it hadn’t ended so soon. I loved the little boy’s imagination and am certain your kids will, too.

 

Monster_and_Son book coverMonster & Son
Written by David LaRochelle
Illustrated by Joey Chou
(Chronicle Books; $16.99, Ages 2-4)
Here’s a fresh take on Father’s Day, a look at the father/son dynamic from all kinds of monsters’ point of view. Filling the pages of this wild ride are yetis, werewolves, dragons, serpents and skeletons sharing their own special, often “rough and rowdy” type of love.

Chou’s visuals are modern. They feel bold and imaginative with colors perfectly suited for a monstrous read. LaRochelle has written Monster & Son using well-paced rhyme that adds to the various father/son activities featured on every page. Whether stirring up waves for a game of catch or frightening off a knight coming to the aid of a damsel in distress, these monster dads all have one thing in common, and though it may be giant-sized, it undeniably love.

 

The Most Important Thing: Stories About Sons, Fathers, and GrandfathersThe_Most_Important_Thing by Avi book cover
Written by Avi
(Candlewick Press; $16.99, Ages 10 and up)
This collection of seven short stories is sure to move middle grade readers and make them think about their own relationships with their fathers and grandfathers. According to the jacket flap, what the stories have in common is that they each explore the question: “What is the most important thing a father can do for his son?” Each story features a new character facing a different situation.

Stories flows easily one to the next meaning they can be read in one sitting or just one at a time. I’ve chosen three to highlight here. In the book’s opening story, Dream Catcher, Paul is an 8th grader who feels disconnected from his father. When circumstances require him to spend a week of school break with his estranged grandfather in Denver, Paul begins to understand the demons that have plagued his grandfather and caused the estrangement. Both Paul and his grandfather work together to forge a new relationship leaving the reader with hope that Paul’s father and grandfather may too at last be reconciled.

Beat Up introduces Charlie who has plans to attend a church dance despite a friend’s warning that gangs may be present. Though the dance goes off well, Charlie gets surrounded by a gang then beat up on his way home, only to be chastised by his unforgiving father for having pretended to be hurt and knocked out rather than fighting back and putting himself at greater risk. “Biderbiks don’t cry” is what Charlie’s dad believes, but Charlie is clearly not a coward for having sought a safe solution to his assault. Beat Up is a powerful tale of a son’s courage to speak up in the face of his father’s unjust fury.

Departed deals with the accidental death of Luke’s father before their camping trip that shakes up a family. When what appears to be the father’s ghost remains around the apartment, Luke realizes what he must do with his father’s ashes to set his soul free, and thus come to terms with his father’s passing. While there are not always happy endings, there are certainly realistic, satisfying, and sometimes heart wrenching conclusions offering much to learn from the various young men’s approach to life and the father/son dynamic.

Papa Seahorse’s SearchPapa_Seahorses_Search book cover
by Anita Bijsterbosch
(Clavis; $14.95, Ages 1-4)
A sturdy lift-the-flap counting book about a Papa Seahorse looking everywhere for his missing little seahorse. Numbers introduced range from 1-10 and the cast of characters making appearances behind and in front of the assorted flaps include a colorful puffer fish, sea turtles, angelfish, sea snake, crabs, a sea anemone, jellyfish, octopuses and shrimp. This book will provide interactive fun for pre-schoolers and toddlers alike.

 

Superhero_Dad by Timothy Knapman book coverSuperhero Dad
Written by Timothy Knapman
Illustrated by Joe Berger
(Nosy Crow; $15.99, Ages 3-7)
Kids will relate to the main character’s über admiration for his father in this rhyming read-aloud, Superhero Dad. Though not a new concept, the idea of a dad who can make a super breakfast though he’s only half awake, or make monsters disappear, is one that is always appealing to children. Coupled with comic book styled artwork, and a definitely cool die-cut cover, this humorous take on what qualities qualify for superhero-dom is a fast paced, fun read that is sure to please for Father’s Day.

 

Gator DadGator_Dad by Brian Lies book cover
Written and illustrated by Brian Lies
(Houghton Mifflin Harcourt; $17.99, Ages 4-7)
If you’re looking for something original, this is it. The father in Brian Lies’ Gator Dad knows how to show his kids a good time and that’s evident on every wild and wacky gator-filled page. Intent on squeezing in the most fun a day can offer with his three gator kids, Gator Dad can make roaming aimlessly in the park an adventure, make bath time the best time, and make bed time stories come alive. It’s obvious this dad gains the greatest joy giving his gator-all in everything he does with and for his children.

 

Additional recommended books include:

Be Glad Your Dad…(Is Not an Octopus!) 
Written by Matthew Logelin and Sara Jensen
Illustrated by Jared Chapman
(Little Brown BYR; $16.99, Ages 2-5)

Tell Me a Tattoo Story
Written by Alison McGhee
Illustrated by Eliza Wheeler
(Chronicle Books; $16.99, Ages 3-5)

  • Reviewed by Ronna Mandel
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The Perfect Percival Priggs by Julie-Anne Graham

The Perfect Percival Priggs
Written and illustrated by Julie-Anne Graham
(Running Press; $16.95, Ages 3 and up)

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            Everyone in the family will love this silly and heartfelt story about doing too much, and trying to be perfect!

 

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Interior art from The Perfect Percival Priggs by Julie-Anne Graham, Running Press ©2015.

Percival’s parents are perfect and they have all the awards to prove it. Percival wants to be perfect, too. He enters every competition, for everything, including the things he doesn’t even like. He’s sure that if he doesn’t do this, his parents won’t love him anymore.

But, being perfect is quite exhausting! So, Percival comes up with a perfect plan to make things easier. Only, it doesn’t. It just makes a big mess!

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Interior art from The Perfect Percival Priggs by Julie-Anne Graham, Running Press ©2015.

That’s when Percy finds out that being perfect is not what makes his parents love him. They show him all of their mistakes hidden away in the attic.

It’s then that Percy learns that doing what you love, and working hard at it, is what really matters.

With fun and wonderfully detailed illustrations, and just the right amount of text to tell the story, this book is, well … Perfect!

– Guest Reviewer Jo Ann Banks

 

Jo Ann Banks is a writer of children’s stories, poems, and silly songs. Jo Ann has such an incredible love of children’s stories that some people say she never grew up. When she hears that, she just covers her ears and sings, “I’m not listening, I’m not listening …”

To learn more silly facts about her, go to joannbanks.com

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