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Finding a Way Forward – Tiny Infinities by J. H. Diehl

TINY INFINITIES
Written by J. H. Diehl
(Chronicle Books; $16.99, Ages 10 and up)

– A Junior Library Guild Selection –

cover illustration from Tiny Infinities by J. H. Diehl

In Tiny Infinities, the debut middle grade novel by J. H. Diehl, the summer when Alice turns thirteen, her family’s structure disintegrates. Her mother has become a bedridden recluse, her father moves out, and Alice’s two brothers are temporarily placed with their aunt. Alice willfully stays at the family home, erecting the Renaissance tent her parents met in, resolving to sleep in the backyard until her father returns. Due to finances, cell phones, internet, and camps are cut. Earning money babysitting is bittersweet—Alice’s parents are too distracted to pay much attention. Alice discovers each family has complications. Piper, the young girl she watches, has an undiagnosed loss of speech and possibly hearing.

This quiet story considers deep issues including how one family member’s illness or injury affects everyone. Because of her parents’ split and her mother’s inability to recover, Alice loses touch with close friends rather than explain.

Swimming keeps Alice centered; she’s determined to get her name on her swim team’s record board. A friendship with the new girl, Harriet, develops. Harriet’s keen observations while somewhat off-putting are also perceptive: she advises Alice to switch to backstroke. While this is another change, Alice eventually realizes that she likes swimming backwards without seeing where she’s going; it gives her confidence in her ability to maneuver the pool, and life. Alice and her friends learn from one another how to find their way—realizing it is their way to find.

Tiny Infinities is an honest coming-of-age middle-grade novel. Alice understands for the first time that there is “no line between hot and cold, or warm and cool, love and not love. Tiny infinities [are] always going to be there.”

Fireflies play a clever role in the novel throughout. Beneath the book’s beautiful glimmering jacket is a stunning smooth casewrap adorned with fireflies. The brightly contrasting endpapers offer a pop of color.

  • Reviewed by Christine Van Zandt

Writer, editor, and owner of Write for Success www.Write-for-Success.com

@WFSediting, Christine@Write-for-Success.com

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What We’re Reading for Mother’s Day 2018

BEST BOOKS FOR MOTHER’S DAY 2018
A ROUNDUP

 

 

Happy Mother's Day pink roses bouquet image

 

How do you celebrate Mother’s Day? With our recommendations for the best new Mother’s Day books around! And, whatever you may do, wherever you may go, take some time to read together with your children at home, in a park, on a train, at a bookstore or in a library. Books make memorable gifts and, with an added personal message, will be cherished for years to come.

 

A Heart Just Like My Mother's cover illustrationA Heart Just Like My Mother’s
Written by Lela Nargi
Illustrated by Valeria Cis
(Kar-Ben; $17.99 Hardcover, $7.99 Paperback, Ages 3-8)

In A Heart Just Like My Mother’s, when Anna, who loves and admires her mother is inspired to help a homeless man by saving up her Tzedakah money, she realizes she and her mom share something in common—a big heart. This lovely picture book is a wonderful way to explain the Jewish tradition of performing an act Tzedakah which Nargi defines not so much as charity but doing the right thing by helping others. But it’s also the story of a little girl who starts out thinking she could never be as creative, funny or caring as her mother until she realizes what she has to offer. By collecting Tzedakah money and providing food for the homeless man, Anna’s selfless act of kindness brings her closer to her mother and proves to herself that she too has qualities worth being proud of. I love Cis’s illustrations too. There’s a warm, folksy feeling about them that adds to the positive vibe that emanates from the pages making A Heart Just Like My Mother’s such an enjoyable read.

Forever or a Day cover illustration by Susan JacobyForever or a Day
Written and illustrated by Sarah Jacoby
(Chronicle Books; $17.99, Ages 3-5)

With its starred reviews from both School Library Journal and Publishers Weekly, Forever or a Day by Sarah Jacoby will make a thoughtful gift this holiday for those seeking something at once out of the ordinary as well as heartwarming. It conveys its beautiful message with spare yet evocative text and in just 20 pages. At first I thought it was a picture book about the future, but then it dawned on me that it’s about being present and spending time together with loved ones and making meaningful moments now. Adults and children may experience different reactions when reading the book but that’s to be expected. Sophie Blackall, Caldecott Medal-winning and New York Times–bestselling illustrator of Finding Winnie, says it best: “Sarah Jacoby’s ethereal exploration of time rushes like a passing train, shimmers like a setting sun and allows us, just for a moment, to appreciate the beauty of standing still.” Prepare to be moved by the compelling art that complements the lyrical language of Forever or a Day.

I've Loved You Since Forever cover illustrationI’ve Loved You Since Forever
Written by Hoda Kotb
Illustrated by Suzie Mason
(HarperCollins BYR; $18.99, Ages 4-8)

Precious pairings of mothers and and animal babies from bluebirds and bunnies to otters and owls fill the pages of Today show co-host Hoda Kotb’s debut picture book, I’ve Loved You Since Forever. Kotb adopted her daughter, Haley Joy, in February 2017 and her happiness at becoming a mother is infectious and evident throughout this delightful picture book. Gentle rhyme, a repeated refrain (there was you … and there was me), a rewarding wrap up and exuberant illustrations all work wonderfully together. I’d pick up I’ve Loved You Since Forever for any new parent on your holiday list. In addition to Kotb’s lovely language, there’s a sense of warmth and closeness from the special bond of parenthood depicted in Mason’s tender scenarios. Whether or not you’re an adoptive parent, I’m sure these lines will resonate with you as they did with me: Before otters swam together/and rivers reached the sea/there was you and there was me/waiting for the day our stars would cross/and you and I turned into we. Awww!

American Mom: A Celebration of Motherhood in Pop Culture
by Meredith Hale
(Sterling Publishing; $19.95)

In 176 color pages and 12 clever chapters, author Hale deftly delves into the world of motherhood from various perspectives that readers will find fascinating. The introduction says the book “explores the changing role of motherhood through the images and shared cultural moments that have captured it best: magazines, advertisements, greeting cards, television shows, movies, songs, and other pop culture ephemera.” Choose a chapter at a time because this comprehensive and enlightening book is meant to be savored slowly (like a 1950s TV mom’s best casserole) and cannot be read in one or even two sittings. I love the breadth of the material that’s been included and am partial to the earlier chapters that cover motherhood in the eras before I was born including The Nineteenth Century, The Pre-War Years, World War I, The Roaring Twenties, The Great Depression, World War II, The 1950s (although note that American Mom does go all the way to present day 21st century). I learned, for example, that between “1885 and 1905, there were around eleven thousand magazines and periodicals published in the United States—and about 88 percent of the subscribers were women,” that Betty Crocker was a fictional character, that Eleanor Roosevelt “broadened the role” of first lady and that on I Love Lucy they couldn’t say the word pregnant on the show! Through Hale’s insightful lens on motherhood, we’re taken on an entertaining jaunt through fashion, food, first ladies, feminism, photography, film and literature that pays tribute to the ever changing role of mothers in American life and touches on aspects of this expansive topic in ways that will interest every reader, male or female.

If you’re looking for a fun, original board book for Mother’s Day, look no further than
From Mother to Mother
Written and illustrated by Emilie Vast
Translated from French by Julia Cormier
(Charlesbridge; $7.99, Ages 0-3)
Simple in concept, but rich in design elements, this 14-page board book is perfect for little ones who adore the pull-apart Matryoshka dolls. Every other page takes a child back several generations of a mother’s mother’s mother’s mother who in turn gave birth to a child eventually bringing the reader to the present. “And not long ago, I gave birth to you … my very own child. A mother’s love goes on and on and on.” What a beautiful sentiment to share with a young child while cuddling them close and showing them all the different colored pages, each with unique and nature-inspired artwork. There’s also a version for dads!

  • Reviewed by Ronna Mandel

Read our Mother’s Day recommendations from 2017 here.

Read Cathy Ballou Mealey’s review of Love, Mama here.

 

If You Want to Fall Asleep by Jackie Azúa Kramer – Blog Tour

 

IF YOU WANT TO FALL ASLEEP
THE BLOG TOUR 2018

Written by Jackie Azúa Kramer
Illustrated by Lisa Brandenburg
(Clavis Books; $17.99, Softcover $9.95, Ages 3 and up)

 

Cover illustration for If You Want to Fall Asleep

 

Short summary of If You Want to Fall Asleep by Jackie Azúa Kramer with illustrations by Lisa Brandenburg: It’s a sweet bedtime battle between Little Mouse’s endless excuses for his lack of sleep and his mother’s loving and imaginative suggestions. A night filled with pirates, pancakes, floating among stars. Wait for yawning. And stretching. And sleepy thoughts. And drowsy eyes.

GRWR REVIEW:

I have always loved bedtime stories and have the fondest memories of reading them to my children. A lot of picture books simply become bedtime reads by virtue of their popularity even though they do not necessarily induce nodding out, while others, just as good, are intentionally written that way. The latter applies to Azúa Kramer’s sweet, comforting tale. Mama Mouse has put Little Mouse to bed but he’s not quite ready to lay still, something we’re all familiar with. In slightly muted colors, Brandenburg’s cheerful mixed media artwork depicts Little Mouse’s toys and stuffed animals at first being a big distraction. After Mama Mouse softly suggests the following to bring on yawning and get Little Mouse into the sleepy zone …

 

If you want to fall asleep and you’re jumping on your bed …
Read pages in a story.
Not one or two or three,
but the whole book, from cover to cover.

… readers will actually see the stuffed animals and toys have reacted more to Mama’s suggestion than Little Mouse has. It’s clear that his mind’s moving a million miles an hour. Helping to calm his over-active brain, Mama Mouse offers another soothing refrain and gently suggests he think about scrumptious food and wait for stretching. This repetition of mom’s reassuring words continues as Little Mouse remains unable to sleep meaning more visits to Mama, more ways to settle down, until he can finally fall asleep.

 

Interior illustration of Little Mouse jumping on blanket from If You Want to Fall Asleep

Interior artwork from If You Want to Fall Asleep written by by Jackie Azúa Kramer with illustrations by Lisa Brandenburg, courtesy of Clavis Books ©2018.

 

With quiet sounding language and a soothing rhythm, Azúa Kramer’s writing does an impressive job of lulling little ones to sleep. Parents will appreciate that there’s just the right amount of words since the ideal bedtime story should be under 10 minutes long to read. And when, in the end, Mama Mouse gives hugs to her child, it’s a wonderful way to wrap up story time and kiss your own child good-night. I have no doubt that they’ll be relaxed, ready to drift off to dreamland filled with loving thoughts and a smiling face.

 

Everyone is asleep illustration from end pages of If You Want to Fall Asleep

Interior artwork from end pages of If You Want to Fall Asleep written by by Jackie Azúa Kramer with illustrations by Lisa Brandenburg, courtesy of Clavis Books ©2018.

 

・Reviewed by Ronna Mandel

 

See what other reviewers on the blog tour have said about
author Azúa Kramer’s book here: https://www.jackieazuakramer.com/iwfa-blog-tour

Read about illustrator Brandenburg’s technique in this Kidlit411 interview.

Headshot of If You Want to Fall Asleep author Jackie Azúa Kramer

Author Jackie Azúa Kramer


Jackie Azúa Kramer

The Green Umbrella (NorthSouth, Feb. 2017)
The Boy & the Eight Hundred Pound Gorilla (Candlewick Press, 2020)
If You Want to Fall Asleep (Clavis, May 2018)
That’s for Babies (Clavis, TBD)
Miles Won’t Smile (Clavis, TBD)
How Lilly Ate the Rainbow (FastPencil, 2011)

 

Visit the author to learn more: Jackieazuakramer.com

Twitter @jackiekramer422

Facebook Jackie Azúa Kramer

Instagram

 

Children’s Books for Mother’s Day 2017

BEST CHILDREN’S BOOKS FOR MOTHER’S DAY
– A ROUNDUP –

 

Mama’s KissesMama's Kisses cover art
Written by Kate McMullan
Illustrated by Tao Nyeu
(Dial BYR; $16.99, Ages 3-5)

With starred reviews from both Publishers Weekly and Booklist, Mama’s Kisses is sure to be an in-demand picture book for many Mother’s Days to come. McMullan has written a sweet ode to the unwavering devotion and patience of moms, in this case, rainforest moms. The moon is on the rise and four mommy animals are on the lookout for their young ones, a baby panda, elephant, orangutan and leopard. As bedtime beckons, the babies engage in a playful game of hide-and-seek that seems so successful until all at once, when the moms are ready, their hiding place is uncovered. But being found means getting kisses, smooches, and hugs galore until tired eyes can no longer remain open. Dreamland is drawing nigh so the baby animals go to sleep soon followed by their tired moms, always close at hand. Conveyed in uncomplicated rhyme and calming rhythm, Mama’s Kisses is a gentle bedtime tale perfect for pre-schoolers. Nyeu’s artwork fills all corners of most every page and, though using only oranges, yellows and blues, she manages to create a subtle softness, warmth and calming mood with just these few well chosen hues.

Love isCover image for Love is by Diane Adams
Written by Diane Adams
Illustrated by Claire Keane
(Chronicle Books; $15.99, Ages 3-5)

Whether it’s for Mother’s Day, Valentine’s Day, Graduation or simply just because, Love is by Diane Adams will make a great gift. Love is a girl and her duckling. Looking after the fuzzy little creature is not unlike a mother caring for her child which is why Love is works on many levels. It’s a story about loving and nurturing something that is dear to you, as well as being about the responsibility involved in such a privilege. “Love is holding something fragile, tiny wings and downy head. Love is noisy midnight feedings, shoebox right beside the bed.” The little girl must also accept that her duckling is growing. She will soon need to allow her pet to move on, fend for itself, find a new home and start a family all its own, all the while knowing that the love she has shared will not be forgotten. This 32 page picture book is a delightful read aloud story with well-paced rhyme and evocative illustrations that, coupled with the meaningful verse, will tug at your heartstrings.

How to Raise a Mom book cover imageHow To Raise a Mom
Written by Jean Reagan
Illustrated by Lee Wildish
(Alfred A. Knopf BYR; $17.99, Ages 4-8)

Another winner from the creators of the How To picture book series, How to Raise a Mom will totally charm moms, dads and kids alike.
“Raising a happy, healthy mom is fun … and important! Are you ready for some tips?” The sibling narrators take readers through their mother’s typical day as part of their instruction guide, and clearly based on the wonderful rearing and love they’re getting from her. After kisses to awaken her, and giving her choices for the day’s outfit, the kids take her to the supermarket and the playground to name a few places while also leaving quiet time for her to get some work done. It’s fantastic to be treated again to Wildish’s whimsical illustrations like those found in the other How To books, full of humorous not-to-miss touches and amusing expressions in every spread. Kids will especially get a kick out of the dog and cat Wildish includes in many scenes. The children also cover playtime, mealtime and finish up the full day with stories and snuggles. I loved how they occasionally mimic just what Mom always says to them such as “Thank you so much, Sweat Pea, for being so patient,” or “Remember to be a good sharer!” There is so much to enjoy in this picture book tribute celebrating moms everywhere.

  • Reviewed by Ronna Mandel

 

More recommended children’s books for Mother’s Day:

Love 
Written and illustrated by Emma Dodd
(Nosy Crow; $12.99, Ages 2-5)

 

 

When I Carried You in My Belly
Written by Thrity Umriar
Illustrated by Ziyue Chen
(Running Press Kids; $16.99, Ages 4-8)

 

 

I Love My Mommy
by Sebastien Braun
(Harper Collins; $7.99, Ages 0-4)

 

 

 

Mommy Snuggles
by Anne Gutman and Georg Hallensleben
(Chronicle Books; $5.99, Ages 1-3)

Best Books for Mother’s Day Roundup

BEST CHILDREN’S BOOKS FOR MOTHER’S DAY

 

HAPPY MOTHER’S DAY 2016

Let’s get ready for the holiday today with this roundup of new books for children.

Canticos: Little Chickies Los Pollitos book coverCanticos: Little Chickies/Los Pollitos
by Susie Jaramillo
(Encantos Media; $14.99, Ages 0-5)
This adorable, sturdy board book, the first in a series, celebrates moms in a most unique way. Its format is reversible – an original Spanish version is on one side for both the enjoyment by native Spanish speakers and to encourage the early learning of a second language. Turn it over for an English adaption of this children’s nursery rhyme about little chicks being born and their devoted mama hen seeking food with which to feed them. She provides warmth when they’re cold and gives them all the love they deserve. Designed in accordion style with bright artwork and the simple story (no more that six words on a page) on both sides, the book can be read folded up or opened up in its entirety. Have your little ones try it both ways. Preschoolers will find all the interactive lift-the-flaps and spin-wheel features hard to resist. I know I did! A bonus – little ones can sing along with the Canticos: Los Pollitos App for smartphones and tablets. There are activities to keep your children busy and entertained for hours. For every Canticos book purchased, the company will donate books to preschool programs across the U.S. to help low-income families in need. Visit the website to see what other books are on the horizon. www.canticosworld.com

MamasaurusMamasaurus cover
Written and illustrated by Stephan Lomp
(Chronicle Books; $16.99, Ages 3-5)
Illustrator Stephan Lomp makes his picture book debut in Mamasauras as both author and illustrator. After Babysaurus slips off the back of Mamasaurus and loses sight of her, he embarks on a “Are You My Mother?” type journey through the wild jungle. As he encounters the offspring of various dinosaurs, Babysaurus is certain someone will have spotted her – after all she takes huge steps, has a wonderful long neck, is taller than the tallest tree and “She’s the biggest there is!” Using bold artwork (I like the white text against the black background) with some subtle humor, Lomp’s Mamasaurus is a fun addition to this Mother’s Day Roundup mix.

 

 

You Made Me a MotherYou Made Me a Mother
Written by Laurenne Sala
Illustrated by Robin Preiss Glasser
(HarperCollins BYR; $15.99, Ages 4-8)
This charming book, just perfect for Mother’s Day, opens with a mom-to-be waiting for the birth of her first child. “I followed advice. I read twelve books. I ate lots of spinach. Could you tell I was nervous?” The mother in this story expresses her love for her child, her desire to make him happy and the honest realization she’s not perfect, but willing to do all that’s in her heart to be there for her child. “I made you, but you made me a mother.” That powerful last line resonates with me and is a moving one to share with children. Sala has found an original way to present motherhood to youngsters with an economy of words and richness in spirit. Glasser’s touching illustrations add to the joy of this story making it a most delightful Mother’s Day read.

 

Our Love GrowsOur Love Grows cover image
Written and illustrated by Anna Pignataro
(Sourcebooks Jabberwocky; $16.99, Ages 4 and up)
Meet Panda Mama and her son Pip, together in a bamboo forest, the beautiful setting of this heartwarming story. Pip asks “Mama, when will be big?” And Mama explains, in the most poetic and touching of ways, how exactly when compared to nature, he has indeed grown while at the same time, so has her love for him. The things the mama panda points out to her son are so evocative and lovingly told in gentle rhyme. “Once this tree was smaller too. And the stars above were just a few. Your paw print was tiny in the snow, and every step was far to go.” Getting into the head of a panda isn’t easy, but Pignataro makes it seem that way with the imagery and examples. Kids will appreciate seeing the sweet owl plush toy Pip holds in most of the spreads and parents will enjoy the calming cadence of the text, likely choosing this as an ideal bedtime story that’s definitely not just for Mother’s Day as a mother’s love is year ’round.

  • Reviewed by Ronna Mandel

Additional Recommendations:

Ella The Elephant: Ella and the Mother’s Day Surprise (Grosset & Dunlap; $3.99, Ages 3-5)
My Mother My Heart: A Joyful Book to Color by Eleri Fowler (HarperCollins; $15.99)

Best Picture Books for Mother’s Day – A Roundup

A MOTHER’S DAY ROUNDUP OF PICTURE BOOKS

One of my favorite holidays is Mother’s Day. I get to kick my feet up, relax, and get spoiled for several blissful hours. Okay, who am I kidding? That actually doesn’t really happen chez moi, but that’s not what Mother’s Day is about anyway, is it? Love is really at the core of this special day. Let’s look at some picture books that celebrate all kinds of moms in all kinds of ways, because no mom is the same and we wouldn’t want it any other way.

 

Are You My Mommy? AreYouMyMommycvr.jpgby Mary Murphy (Candlewick; $6.99, Ages 0-3) – This lift-the-flaps board book features an adorable little light blue collared  puppy meeting lots of different animals as he asks, “Are you my mommy?” Naturally, each animal encountered replies no and explains what animal he is. “No, I’m a sheep.” The reveal is each animal’s own special baby, from a lamb to a calf, a foal and a kitten, a piglet and a duckling until the most lovely surprise, the puppy’s mommy, a purple collared dog. As little ones enjoy the colorful illustrations done in mixed media with bold black outlines, they’ll learn new words and have fun lifting all the die-cut flaps.

Mom School MomSchoolcvr.jpgby Rebecca Van Slyke with illustrations by Priscilla Burris (Doubleday Books for Young Readers; $16.99, Ages 3-7) – What a clever idea, a school for moms! I sure could have used a class or two at this place because, while I may be great at cutting and gluing like the little girl narrating this charming story, I never had a lesson in the cool kinds of classes she imagines her mom attended. There’s the essential learning how to grocery shop without losing your child class. There’s pitching 101 so moms can toss a ball that’s easy to hit. And of course, we can’t leave out the ever popular, and delicious, cupcake baking course. Here’s one of my faves, and it’s got to be called Mom’s Mandatory Multi-tasking:

 

 At Mom School, they learn how to do more than one thing at a time,
like talking on the phone and fixing my hair, and making dinner while
listening to a song I just made up.

 

Mom School is a sweet, positive picture book not just for Mother’s Day because the skills moms acquire at this school are utilized throughout the year. The adorable, humorous pastel-toned artwork by Burris is expressive and cheerful. Kids are going to enjoy thinking of other classes that their moms are likely to have attended and perhaps, inspired by Van Slyke’s words and Burris’ illustrations, they can try their hand at drawing their own pictures to show all the neat things moms know.

If-My-Mom-Were-a-Bird-cvr.jpgIf My Mom Were a Bird by Jedda Robaard (Little Bee Books; $14.99, Ages 4-7) – is such an imaginative, beautiful picture book. “If your mom were a bird,” it says on the book’s back cover, “what kind of bird would she be?” There is not a lot of text in this picture book, but the economy of words works wonderfully because the type of bird each child imagines their mother would be is perfectly presented in the artwork.

               If my mom were a bird, she would surely be a watchful … hawk.

The watercolor illustrations on the pages feel crisp, joyful and complement the traits the kids have chosen,

If-My-Mom-Were-a-Bird-Spread-1.jpg

Interior artwork from If My Mom Were a Bird by Jedda Robaard, Little Bee Books, ©2015.

capturing the mood without a lot of description.

If-My-Mom-Were-a-Bird-Spread2.jpg

Interior artwork from If My Mom Were a Bird by Jedda Robaard, Little Bee Books, ©2015.

 

As with Mom School, If My Mom Were a Bird is a year round story, but also just right to share on Mother’s Day.

Two other terrific picture books I’d like to recommend are:
Heather Has Two MommiesHeather-Has-Two-Mommies.jpg by Lesléa Newman with illustrations by Laura Cornell (Candlewick Press; $16.99, Ages 3-7) – This is a brand-new edition of the modern classic. And for Mother’s Day, what’s better than having one mom? Having two!! There are many different kinds of families and the family depicted in Heather Has Two Mommies is a family unit made up of two moms, no dad.  What counts in families is not being just like every other family, but being loved.

 

Pete the Cat: Rock on, Mom and Dad!PeteTheCat-Rock-On-Mom-Dad.jpg by James Dean (HarperFestival; $6.99, Ages 4-8) – Kids who are crazy about the cat will go wild for this paperback which includes 30 stickers, a fold-out poster and cards. How does a grateful cat say thank you to his parents for all they do? How can he show them how much he loves them? His big, smart brother Bob tells him,

                                          “It doesn’t matter what you do, it’s how you do it.”

And in a classic example of actions speaking louder than words, Pete composes a song and plays it for his parents. He rocks it out of the park and right into their hearts.

–  Reviewed by Ronna Mandel

Power Down, Little Robot by Anna Staniszewski

POWER DOWN, LITTLE ROBOT
Written by Anna Staniszewski
Illustrated by Tim Zeltner
(Henry Holt and Company, $16.99, Ages 3-7)

 

Power-Down-Little-Robot-cvr.jpg

In a pale green, star-filled cosmos, a little red robot is relaxing with snacks and television when his mother announces that it is time for bed. With a reluctant frown, he turns on his stalling program. Little Robot will do anything to avoid powering down! He lingers by the pantry, hoping for a can of oil. Then he dallies at the sink, brushing his cogs at half his normal rate. When he asks Mom Unit to read him a bedtime manual, she chooses the thinnest one on the shelf. She even has the nerve to fast-forward!

Power-Down-Little-Robot-int.jpg

Interior artwork from Power Down, Little Robot by Anna Staniszewski with illustrations by Tim Zeltner, Henry Holt Books ©2015.

 

Parents and kids will relate easily to this tale of bedtime resistance, told with pitch-perfect flair in Anna Staniszewski’s debut picture book. She has charmingly translated every kooky but common human toddler complaint about slumbertime into sweet, humorous robot-ese.

Mom Unit, firm but ever-patient, maintains her slight smile and weary half-lidded eyes as Little Robot moves into stalling phase part two. He needs his favorite toy -a riveted, antennae-sporting teddy. He wants to whisper secrets about the hummingbot. And Mom Unit must not forget to check the closet for rust monsters!

Little Robot resists and resists, but Mom Unit is determined to tuck him into his sleep module so he can power down and recharge for the next day. Can he continue battling bedtime, or will his programmed resistance to the fluffy pillows and soft blankets finally wear down?

Power-Down-Little-Robot-int.jpg

Interior artwork from Power Down, Little Robot by Anna Staniszewski with illustrations by Tim Zeltner, Henry Holt Books ©2015.

 

Illustrator Tim Zeltner depicts an ultra modern, space age robot home with crisp, metallic elements. He balances the stark interiors with soft-eyed, expressive characters that gently gleam. Zeltner’s images are created with acrylic on plywood using unique combinations of stains and glazes. The colorful boy bot and his purple-pink mother pop against the muted backgrounds.

If your young cyborg fights sleepytime with a vast array of ruses and excuses, this is the book for you! POWER DOWN, LITTLE ROBOT will tame toddler tuck-in troubles and delight parents at the same time.

– Reviewed by Cathy Ballou Mealey

 

Where Obtained:  I reviewed a promotional copy of POWER DOWN, LITTLE ROBOT from the publisher and received no compensation. The opinions expressed here are my own.

Olive Marshmallow by Katie Saunders

OLIVE MARSHMALLOW
Written and illustrated by Katie Saunders
(Little Bee Books; $16.99, Ages 3-6)

 

olive-marshmallow-cvr.jpg

Meet Archie, the main character of this adorable new picture book, Olive Marshmallow by Katie Saunders, inspired by her actual experience when she was expecting her second child.

olive-marshmallow-int.jpg

Interior artwork from Olive Marshmallow written and illustrated by Katie Saunders, Little Bee Books ©2015.

 

Archie has noticed something different at home. His mom is looking BIGGER. She shows him the ultrasound image, something I haven’t seen in other books, but was happy Saunders thought to include it.

“This is your baby sister growing in Mommy’s tummy,” she says.

Archie is going to be a big brother. Unlike most older siblings usually concerned about a new child stealing the show, this little lad only briefly wonders if he wants a baby sister because what he really likes are “cars, trains, and playing ninjas.” The only objection he seems to have about the changes afoot is all the pinkness that’s filling the house.

He is ABSOLUTELY sure that he doesn’t like fluffy, frilly, very pink things.

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Interior artwork from Olive Marshmallow written and illustrated by Katie Saunders, Little Bee Books ©2015.

For a lot of parents, Archie may seem to be the ideal son, but that’s what’s so sweet about this simple picture book. Olive Marshmallow is actually a super story to share with kids about the imminent arrival of another family member because it’s completely positive, setting it apart from so many of the rivalry-themed books. While those books are very important, and do indeed serve a purpose for helping kids find the words for feelings they may not otherwise be able to articulate, it’s refreshing to read a more innocent approach. Plus the switched on mom in the story is a reassuring presence. While things may not remain the same once the baby comes along, there will be twice the number of toys, and someone to play with (eventually). So it’s no surprise that from the moment Archie meets his marshmallow of a baby sister, it’s love at first sight.

In addition to the upbeat text, this feel good book exudes such joy as a result of Saunder’s lovely palate of soft pinks and baby blues. Her illustration style is a delightful blend of Lauren Child meets Nick Sharratt that kids will love. And you’ll notice she’s included a pet kitty you can point out to your child for some good laughs. Hint: Look for the cat dressed up in a tutu and crown. Things may not be the same anymore for Archie, but they sure will be better!

– Reviewed by Ronna Mandel

Garden-Themed Books for Spring: Lola Plants a Garden & In Mary’s Garden

Lola Plants a Garden
Written by Anna McQuinn and illustrated by Rosalind Beardshaw
(Charlesbridge; $15.95, Ages 2-5)

In Mary’s Garden
By Tina and Carson Kugler
(Houghton Mifflin Harcourt; $16.99, Ages 5-9)

Spring is only a few short weeks away, and most of the country can’t wait to thaw out. In anticipation of sunshine and warmer temperatures, here are two picture books about different types of gardens.

Lola-Plants-Garden-cvr.jpgIn Lola Plants a Garden, young Lola is inspired to plant a garden after reading the “Mary, Mary, quite contrary” poem. First, she conducts her research with books from the library. Next, she and Mommy make a list of Lola’s favorite flowers. Then they’re off to buy seeds and carefully follow the instructions on the seed packets. But growing a garden doesn’t happen quickly, and Lola has to wait. Not to worry, as Lola and her parents have plenty of ways to keep busy.

Lola makes her own flower book…She finds shells and some old beads. She even makes a little Mary Mary. Daddy helps Lola hang her shiny bells. Lola finds Mary Mary a special spot. It’s just perfect. And, before Lola knows it, her flowers grow and her friends visit. They share the crunchy peas and sweet strawberries…What kind of garden will Lola plant next?

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Interior artwork from Lola Plants a Garden by Anna McQuinn with illustrations by Rosalind Beardshaw, Charlesbridge Publishing ©2014

This sweet book highlights the fun of getting back to nature and teaches the virtues of hard work and patience. Good things come to those who wait, and Lola must wait for her flowers to sprout and grow. With the help of her parents, Lola doesn’t dwell on the waiting and enjoys her time with related activities. I just adore the illustrations. They are bright with the little details that convey so much meaning. We know Lola is working hard on her flower book when we see her tongue stick out from the corner of her mouth. And pulling weeds isn’t easy as we can tell from Lola wiping her brow. I especially liked seeing how Mommy and Lola lean into each other as they make cupcakes. These touches are the illustrator’s mastery. The font is also spot on with just the right size and style (modern with clean lines) to help emerging readers identify letters and words.

 

InMarysGarden-cvr.jpgIn Marys’ Garden brings to life a true story of art and inspiration. Mary Nohl was a little girl in Wisconsin who loved to create, invent, and build things. Mary tried woodworking. She helped her father build a house on the shore of Lake Michigan. She won the first place prize in her industrial arts class for building a model airplane. This was unusual for the time, as girls were supposed to follow traditional paths. In fact, Mary was one of only two girls in the class. But Mary had an intrepid spirit and a keen eye for art. As she grew older, she traveled the world and drew inspiration from everywhere. One summer, her dogs, Sassafras and Basil, found driftwood on the lakeshore. Mary then began to hunt for more items—old keys, shiny rocks, feathers, cogs, combs, and on. She began to create. It took a long time to put together all the odds and ends and bits and bobs, but finally Mary was done. The creature was magnificent. She continued to create art piece after art piece in her garden and then in her home. After her death, Mary’s art is being preserved.

My daughters and I greatly enjoy this story. It shows a woman who follows her own path and mind. Despite society’s conventions, Mary Nohl kept true to herself and her muse. These are lofty concepts, but even young children can understand the idea that a person can do what she loves. Older children will hopefully take away the lesson that gender shouldn’t stop someone from achieving milestones and following a dream. The book ends with factual information and photographs of Mary and her garden.

The book’s art is traditional watercolor with digital painting, collage and vintage papers. Postcards, patterns, and writing are used as backgrounds for the main illustrations and offer a look at Mary’s creativity. The “creatures” (statues and creations) are unconventional but fun to study. They demonstrate Mary’s incredible imagination. There’s a lot to take away from In Mary’s Garden—creativity, inspiration, challenging society’s norms, being true to yourself—and it’s well worth the read.

NOTE: If you live in L.A., you can see Tina and Carson Kugler at Once Upon a Time Bookstore at 11a.m. on March 28th.

Here’s a book trailer to enjoy, too.

Estas Manos: Manitas de mi familia / These Hands: My Family’s Hands by Samuel Caraballo

A Celebration of Family!
 Estas Manos: Manitas de mi familia /
These Hands: My Family’s Hands

by Samuel Caraballo with illustrations by Shawn Costello
(Piñata Books, $17.95, Ages 5-9)

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Love of family is celebrated in this heart warming and delightful bilingual picture book. Author Samuel Caraballo’s moving depiction of a young girl’s deep appreciation of her family truly touched my heart! Interwoven throughout the text are symbols of the indigenous people of Latin America with explanations of these symbols at the back of the book. Here is an opportunity for a child to learn about Latin American culture or perhaps these images are wonderfully sweet reminders to a child who is already familiar with them. For me it was a wonderful education! For example the young girl narrating the book says to her mother:

Your hands, the most tender!
When I am scared, they soothe me.
When I am hungry, they always feed me.
When I am thirsty, they give me the most refreshing water.
They give me warmth when I shiver with cold.
Mom, your hands are like rose petals!

I learned that rose petals represent tenderness in Latin America, which is so appropriate. The image of my own sweet mother immediately came to my mind as I remembered her loving care of me in exactly this way. The strong hands of the little girl’s dad who lifts her up every time she falls, the friendly hands of her siblings that encourage her with applause, the happy hands of her grandma who teaches her to lift her spirits by dancing, and the wise hands of her grandfather who teaches her to care for the earth are all described in delightful, vibrant language. In return for the care her family gives her the little girl promises that, when she is a woman, she will always be there for her family.

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Interior spread from Estas Manos: Manitas de mi familia/These Hands: My Family’s Hands by Samuel Caraballo with illustrations by Shawn Costello, Piñata Books for Children © 2014.

Shawn Costello’s warm, joyous illustrations are paired so well with the endearing text. My favorite illustration is the one on the cover that depicts the strong bond of love between the little girl and her grandpa as they both try to reach for the brightest star in the night sky! It is truly magical!

Fans of Munch’s Love You Forever will find much to appreciate in this story of the closeness of family ties, and children will feel comforted knowing that the beautiful love of their family is always there for them. Estas Manos: Manitas de mi familia /These Hands: My Family’s Hands reassures them that they will always be surrounded with family who will provide a circle of protection, fun, and wisdom. This book is a wonderful addition to any library, encouraging young children to learn to appreciate the beauty of both Spanish and English. For me it brought back many happy memories of my own family in whose loving hands I was so well cared for!

– Reviewed by Hilary Taber

 

Tilly’s Staycation by Gillian Hibbs

Tilly’s Staycation, by first time picture book author/illustrator Gillian Hibbs, (Child’s Play Inc.; July 2014; $16.99, Ages 3-8), is reviewed by MaryAnn Locher.

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Tilly’s Staycation written and illustrated by Gillian Hibbs, Child’s Play, 2014.

When I first read Tilly’s Staycation, by first time picture book author/ illustrator Gillian Hibbs (Child’s Play Inc.; July 2014; Ages 3-8; $16.99), I couldn’t help but think of my own childhood. How I longed for a real vacation at some exotic getaway. A place with a built-in pool, a beach, and colorful fruity drinks with fancy paper umbrellas. Some place you couldn’t get to by car, but could only reach by plane, boat, or maybe both!

In this inventive picture book, Tilly watches as one after another of her friends sets off on vacations to India, Paris, Florida, the beach, and camping, leaving Tilly behind. Her mother says not to worry, they’ll have fun together without having to go away. Tilly, however, is skeptical. While she enjoys having a special breakfast in bed with her mom, she isn’t so sure how much fun they’ll have when the city bus they take drops them off at the library.

With a creative mom and an imaginative child, books become adventures, an ordinary picnic becomes a secret rendezvous, and swimming at the local pool – an underwater expedition. Tilly and her mom find treasures at the local market before they head back to their house to spend the night in a vacation home they build for themselves in the living room out of blankets.

Hibbs uses bright primary and cheerful secondary colors to mirror the childlike happiness her words and illustrations inspire.

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Interior spread from Tilly’s Staycation by Gillian Hibbs, Child’s Play, ©2014

Just like Tilly, I never did get that fancy family vacation, not like the ones my friends went on, but I did get to use my imagination to escape the confines of my yard and have a fun-filled summer.
By the end of the book, Tilly says, “I can’t wait to tell my friends about my staycation.”

Puddle Pug by Kim Norman

PUDDLE PUG
Written by Kim Norman
Illustrated by Keika Yamaguchi,
is reviewed today
by MaryAnne Locher.

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Puddle Pug written by Kim Norman and illustrated by Keika Yamaguchi, Sterling Publishing, 2014.

Percy the pug loves puddles. He enjoys puddles of all shapes and sizes. He has his old favorites, which he loves so much he creates a map so he can remember where they are located. Still, he hasn’t found the perfect puddle. Until…

One day Percy heard splashing on
the other side of the fence.
He peered through, and there it was:

The PERFECT puddle.
It was big. It was brown.
And it was oh so friendly.
Percy couldn’t resist.

Perhaps the puddle was inviting, but not the mama pig who occupied it with her three little piglets.

In Puddle Pug, written by Kim Norman and illustrated by Keika Yamaguchi (Sterling Children’s Books, $14.95, Ages 3 and up), Percy, a pug, gets creative and tries to find a way to get on the good side of mama pig and into his perfect puddle. Percy bribes the pig with treats and even tries sneaking into the puddle in disguise, but finds it’s going to take an act of nature to persuade an overprotective sow to let him share her puddle or her piglets, and that’s exactly what happens. After a storm sends pigs scattering in all directions, Percy uses his map to help find Petunia, a teeny, tiny piglet who is lost. Percy not only saves the day, but gets into the good graces of mama pig who finally lets Percy back into the perfect puddle.

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Interior spread from Puddle Pug by Kim Norman with illustrations by Keika Yamaguchi, Sterling Publishing, © 2014.

Norman, the author of several children’s books, combines prose and Seuss-like verse,

Blue puddles,
dew puddles,
thick as turtle
stew puddles.

and creates the perfect rhythm for a good puddle-romping book.

Yamaguchi, a talented Art Center College of Design (Pasadena) graduate and former Disney intern, provides playful illustrations drawn in pencil then digitally painted. Whether you’re a pug person or not, this picture book will leave both you and your little ones wallowing in the joy of friendship and sharing.

Hey pug lovers, did you know you can read more about your favorite dogs at Pugshome.com, a great website for all things pug? And don’t miss their comprehensive article on 7 Reasons Why You Should Own Pugs.

 

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Photograph of pug reading Puddle Pug courtesy of Sterling Publishing, © 2014.

A Gift for Mama by Linda Ravin Lodding is Perfect for Mother’s Day

A MUST FOR MOTHER’S DAY!

A Gift for Mama, written by Linda Ravin Lodding and illustrated by Alison Jay, is reviewed by Ronna Mandel.

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This is the kind of picture book you will want to read slowly and relish as if you were eating a piece of the finest European chocolate after going off a diet. Simply delicious.

I have a soft spot for stories set in Europe, having lived there over 10 years. Cities with beautiful pedestrian-friendly town squares are abundant, and the Viennese ones where so much of A Gift for Mama (Alfred A. Knopf Books for Young Readers, $17.99, Ages 4-8) takes place is no exception. Being transported back to a bustling 19th century Vienna is just part of the pleasure children will experience when reading this gorgeous, uplifting new picture book.

Meet Oskar, an adorable lad eager to find something special to give his mother on her birthday, but alas, he has but one single coin. There, much to Oskar’s delight, “in the middle of the market, was a flower seller.” A bright yellow rose beckoned to him so he used his coin to buy a blossom that would be “the perfect present.”

It doesn’t take long to realize that Oskar has a heart of gold. There’s even a golden, sunshiny quality to all the illustrations, helping the reader feel good all over as Oskar’s kindness is demonstrated again and again. As the story unfolds, Oskar’s encounter with an artist – with whom he trades his rose for a “beautiful horsehair paintbrush” – sets off a series of exchanges with a conductor, a singer, a lyricist, an Empress and ultimately a sad little girl, linking one individual to the other, and always demonstrating Oskar’s generosity.

You can almost hear a waltz playing in the background as you turn the pages of this stunning-to-look-at picture book. Between Lodding’s obvious love of Vienna captured in her prose, and Jay’s crackly-style, vivid vignettes of vintage Viennese life, it’s tempting to book a flight to Austria to track down the places depicted in this must-read picture book. A Gift for Mama is at once a touching tribute to a child’s love for his mother while also an homage to glorious Vienna of a bygone era. I’m going back for seconds!

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