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Kids Book Review: Three New Children’s Books for Mother’s Day 2019

BEST NEW CHILDREN’S BOOKS
FOR MOTHER’S DAY
– A ROUNDUP –

 

My Two Moms and Me board book cover artMY TWO MOMS AND ME
Written by Michael Joosten
Illustrated by Izak Zenou
(Doubleday BYR; $8.99, Ages 0-3)

My Two Moms and Me, a sleek new 22-page board book, looks like it’s as much for the adults reading it as it is for the little ones listening and that makes turning every page a treat. It’s nice to find a board book depicting same-sex families for the littlest family members, their friends and relatives. Whether children have one mom, two moms or even no moms involved in parenting, it’s important they can see themselves and the life they live reflected on the pages of all kinds of books. Joosten, who has also written My Two Dads and Me, describes all the daily activities any family would do from the perspective of the child. The humorous tone of the language adds to the book’s appeal: “At breakfast, we each have a glass of juice. They both like orange, but I’m more of an apple person, myself.” I love that! The families change on every page which works well so readers meet many different kinds of families, some with one child, some with two, some with boys, girls or both, some biracial, some with babies and some with toddlers. Coupled with the cool, contemporary clothing illustrations by fashion illustrator Zenou, My Two Moms and Me is a worthy choice this Mother’s Day.

Mom and Me, Me and Mom book cover illustration
MOM AND ME, ME AND MOM

Written and illustrated by Miguel Tanco
(Chronicle Books; $12.99, Ages 3-6)

If you’re looking for a charming picture book with simple and slightly retro-looking pen and ink style illustrations in shades of coral and black, pick up a copy of Mom and Me, Me and Mom. Similar to My Two Moms and Me above in that a child narrates the story in an almost tongue-in-cheek style, this book captures a mother-daughter relationship and emphasizes its uniqueness. What’s also adorable is that the child conveys what she contributes to the dynamic whether that be helping her mom’s mood or keeping her secrets safe. My two favorite spreads are: in a museum where the mom is studying a modern art paining while the little girl is staring at the water cooler: “I show you how to see things differently.” And then outdoors: “I follow your lead,” which depicts both mom and daughter reading. This one particularly resonated with me having raised avid readers. I have a feeling there’s a quality or activity that Tanco’s chosen to highlight that will also resonate with most mothers.

Superhero Mom by Timothy Knapman bk cvr artSUPERHERO MOM
Written by Timothy Knapman
Illustrated by Joe Berger
(Nosy Crow; $15.99, Ages 3-7)

Superhero Mom, an enjoyable follow up to last year’s Superhero Dad, introduces readers to a little girl who reveres her mom and it’s easy to see why. “She does so many things at once. She zooms from here to theremending … mixing … making … taming tangles in my hair.” We all know someone like that, a mom with energy enough for two. There are lots of super powers on display, all shared in well-metered rhyme,  demonstrating why Mom qualifies as a superhero. They’re totally relatable, too. She carries so much stuff ✓, she appears out of nowhere to kiss away tears ✓, she finds missing toys and, last, but not least, “Every mom’s a SUPERHERO and so is every GIRL!” The art is bold and bright and full of superhero-type energy so I recommend this as an ideal read aloud for any story time since moms are superheroes all year round!

CLICK HERE FOR A LINK TO LAST YEAR’S MOTHER’S DAY ROUNDUP

  • Reviewed by Ronna Mandel
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Portraits of Hispanic American Heroes by Juan Felipe Herrera

Celebrate National Hispanic Heritage Month With This Book!

Portraits of Hispanic American HeroesPortraits-Hispanic-American-Heroes-cvr.jpg by Juan Felipe Herrera with paintings by Raúl Colón (Dial Books for Young Readers 2014, $19.99, Ages 8-12) is reviewed today by Dornel Cerro.

“Although there have been incredible contributions by Hispanic Americans since the beginnings of this nation, their pioneering roles often have been overshadowed and their identities besmirched by terms such as ‘alien’ and ‘illegal.” (p. 7).

Many people have heard about the achievements of famous Hispanic Americans such as Roberto Clemente, Sonia Sotomayor, and César Chavez. However, how many people know …

1. which Hispanic American won a Nobel Prize in Physics?

2. who defeated the British at the Siege of Pensacola (Florida) in 1781?

3. who was the first Latina astronaut?

Don’t know? Find out by reading and relishing this book! Portraits of Hispanic American Heroes is an eye-opening and inspirational celebration of people whose achievements and accomplishments are just begging to be shared with children.

California poet laureate Juan Felipe Herrera reveals the voices of those heroes and heroines – some whose contributions are unacknowledged or have been forgotten in this collection of 19 biographical sketches of Hispanic Americans plus Hero Street USA. The breadth and scope of the people represented here is extraordinary: migrant workers, military officers, teachers, scientists, activists, musicians, and more. Each is placed in the context of his or her times and Herrera demonstrates how all refused to let inequities and other challenges prevent them from realizing their dreams.

Herrera’s engaging narrative weaves unfamiliar terms and Spanish words into the text, making it more authentic and accessible for children:

“The National Farm Workers Association (NFWA) … a powerful organization to help migrant workers make a better life for themselves in the United States (César Chavez, p. 42).”

“…I gnacio E. Lozano escaped from Mexico with his family to El Norte, the United States (p. 21).”

Controversial details are touched upon in a straightforward, non-judgmental way, and, if needed, explained in the context of the time:

“But people got wind that Adelina had been divorced from a military officer … During these times, women were looked down upon for not staying married. Her opponents used this against her and she lost the election (Adelina Otero-Warren, p. 19).”

The collection concludes with two compelling accounts. The first is about Hero Street in Silvis, Illinois, where eight fallen heroes, Mexican American soldiers killed in WWII battles, once lived. The final entry is a complex sestina for Victoria Leigh Soto, the teacher who died protecting her students during the Sandy Hook Elementary School massacre on Dec 14, 2012

Artist Raúl Colón’s “portraits,” made up of watercolor washes, etchings, and litho pencils, seem to catch the inner nobility of each person, perfectly complementing the narrative.

Use this with students as an inspirational introduction to biography or a nonfiction read aloud. Give this to children who are looking for real superheroes. Hopefully it will encourage all children to: “See further and dream larger.” Judith F. Baca, UCLA professor and artist (p. 75).

For those of you who made to this point, here’s the answers to the above questions:

1. Luis Alvarez
2. Bernardo de Galvez
3. Ellen Ochoa

Portraits of Hispanic American Heroes features stunning portraits and biographies of the following: Adelina Otero-Warren, Bernardo de Galvez, César Chavez, David Farragut, Dennis Chavez, Desi Arnaz, Dolores Huerta, Ellen Ochoa, Helen Rodríguez Trías, Hero Street USA, Ignacio Lozano, Jaime Escalante, Joan Baez, Judy Baca, Julia de Burgos, Luis Alvarez, Rita Moreno, Roberte Clemente, Sonia Sotomayor, and Tomas Rivera.

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I Am Amelia Earhart by Brad Meltzer

I am Amelia Earhart, (Dial Books for Young Readers, $12.99, ages 5-8 ) by Brad Meltzer with illustrations by Christopher Eliopoulos, is reviewed by MaryAnne Locher.

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What makes a hero? Someone who accomplishes great things? A person who does what others say can’t be done? An individual who sets a positive example for those around them? In a time when there were distinct lines drawn between appropriate male and female behavior, Amelia Earhart pushed the boundaries and accomplished great things.

In I am Amelia Earhart, one of the first titles published in the new Ordinary People Change the World nonfiction series, Brad Meltzer introduces us to the young Amelia Earhart, a girl determined to soar above the limitations society placed upon her.

The book begins with a seven-year-old Amelia, shunning dolls and dresses for “flying” self-made roller coasters off of the tool shed in the backyard. Hardly lady-like for a girl from her time, but Amelia found it so thrilling (crash landing and all) that she developed a love for flying.

We learn that she took her very first flight at the age of 23, worked in various un-ladylike jobs to save up for her flying lessons and to ultimately buy her own plane, before breaking numerous flying records, which included being the first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic.

For parents who want to encourage their daughters to be strong, capable women, or show their sons that girls can do anything too, this book, with fun colorful illustrations by Christopher Eliopoulos, is the ticket. Let your children’s imagination fly with I am Amelia Earhart.

Click here for some hero-oriented activities.

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