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The Star Festival or Tanabata Matsuri – A Guest Post by Moni Ritchie Hadley

FIND OUT IN THIS GUEST POST

WHY DEBUT AUTHOR MONI RITCHIE HADLEY

CHOSE TO WRITE ABOUT THE STAR FESTIVAL 

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StarFestival CVR

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Starred Review – School Library Journal

THE STAR FESTIVAL, also known as the Tanabata Matsuri, takes place in Japan on the seventh day of the seventh month. It is celebrated on July 7th in regions following the gregorian calendar and August 7th of the lunar calendar.

I researched many beautiful landscapes and images, knowing that one would eventually become the backdrop of my story. Which were my top choices, and how did I choose?

Hanami Matsuri, the Cherry Blossom Festival, takes place in the Spring determined by the sakura, or cherry blossom, forecast in particular regions. Sometimes performances and tea ceremonies are performed under the trees, but the main activity is to picnic under the pink-blossomed sky.

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Hanami Festival
“Hanami Festival” by dvdhaven 🙂 is licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

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Hina Matsuri has many names, the Japanese Doll Festival, Girl’s Day, and the Peach Festival, due to the time of year that it’s held-March 3rd. Originally, dolls made of paper and straw were sent down a river to set misfortunes adrift. In modern times, fancier dolls displayed inside homes invite prosperity and happiness.

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 Hinamatsuri Japanese Doll Festival or Girls' Day
“Japanese Doll Festival, Girls’ Day: Hinamatsuri, Kyoto; ひな祭り、ひな人形、京都” by Nullumayulife is licensed under CC BY 2.0
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Yuki Matsuri, the Sapporo Snow Festival, is celebrated in Hokkaido, a colder region of Japan. Famous for its ice sculptures, this modern-day festival began in 1950 when a group of high school students sculpted snow figures in Odori Park. Contests are held every February and attract visitors from all over the world.
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Yuki Matsuri Japanese Ice Temple photo by Aaron Quigley
“Yuki-Matsuri Japanese Ice temple” by Aaron Quigley is licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0
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The festival that became the backdrop to my story is equally beautiful to all of these mentioned. It was the folklore behind the Star Festival that drew me in. Orihime and Hikoboshi, two star-crossed lovers, forbidden to see each other but once a year, cross the Milky Way bridge and meet on the day of the Tanabata, offering a parallel to Keiko, my main character, crossing a sea of celebration to find her Oba or grandmother.

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Keiko's bridge The Star Festival
Interior spread from The Star Festival written by Moni Ritchie Hadley and illustrated by Mizuho Fujisawa, Albert Whitman & Company ©2021.
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In a few days, you can celebrate the Tanabata Matsuri in your home or town. Gaze at the stars and make a tanzaku (paper wish) to hang on a tree.

Wishes come true at the Star Festival!

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             • Guest Post by Moni Ritchie Hadley
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Author Website: MoniRitchie.com
On Twitter and Instagram – @bookthreader
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Illustrator Website: Mizuho Fujisawa
On Instagram @mizuhofujisawa
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