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Picture Book Review – Lulu the One and Only

LULU THE ONE AND ONLY

Written by Lynnette Mawhinney

Illustrated by Jennie Poh

(Magination Press; $14.99, Ages 4-8)

 

 

Lulu the One and Only cvr

 

 

Starred Review – Kirkus

Written by Lynnette Mawhinney and illustrated by Jennie Poh, Lulu the One and Only opens up a child friendly and honest discussion on the issue of biracial identity.

Little sister Lulu loves her family: Mama, Daddy, and big brother Zane who “makes [her] laugh a lot.” Lulu’s given name is Luliwa which means “‘pearl’ in Arabic.” From Mama’s affectionate affirmations, Lulu knows she is as “unique and gorgeous” as the beautiful Kenyan pearl earrings her mother wears “all the time.” 

 

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Interior artwork from Lulu the One and Only written by Lynnette Mawhinney and illustrated by Jennie Poh, Magination Press ©2020.

 

As proud as she is about her identity, Lulu is equally frustrated at the confusion others feel about her biracial family and the hurtful, ensuing comments they make. This is a critical and eye-opening point in the book for both children and adult readers. The everyday, seemingly harmless comments and questions people ask are in fact questions that expose our deepest held biases and assumptions.

For Lulu, one particularly disturbing question is:  “So, what are you?” In talking to her brother (who also confronts this question on a regular basis), Lulu learns how to respond to the fear and suspicion embedded in “THAT question”:  self-love. Like Zane, Lulu coins her own “power phrase,” a bold and beautiful statement that emphasizes “not what” she is, “but who” she is. When her classmate, Billy, asks the distressing question, she proudly asserts her phrase. Lulu’s confidence in her own self-worth establishes a clear boundary, letting others around her know how she would like to be treated. Poh’s gentle and colorful illustrations echo Lulu’s quiet strength. 

 

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Interior artwork from Lulu the One and Only written by Lynnette Mawhinney and illustrated by Jennie Poh, Magination Press ©2020.

 

A must have for both the home and school library, Lulu the One and Only opens the door to nurturing conversations about diversity. Author Lynnette Mawhinney, who is biracial, includes a note in the back matter to further help families, caregivers and educators validate and support the experiences of biracial children. 

 

Download a curriculum guide and visit the author website:
https://www.lynnettemawhinney.com/for-children.

   •Reviewed by Armineh Manookian

5 2 votes
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Jilanne Hoffmann
July 28, 2020 1:49 pm

Love the illustrations and theme of this book! Now, I’ve just got to find it! Thanks for the rec!

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