How To Catch A Monster by Adam Wallace & Andy Elkerton

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HOW TO CATCH A MONSTER
Written by Adam Wallace
Illustrated by Andy Elkerton
(Sourcebooks Jabberwocky; $10.99, Ages 4-8)

Plus a Rafflecopter Giveaway 

cover image from How to Catch a Monster

A USA Today Bestseller!

From the creators of the New York Times bestselling How to Catch a Leprechaun and How to Catch an Elf!

There’s a monster in my closet,

with claws, and teeth, and hair,

and tonight, I’m going to scare him!

He lives just right through there …

Get ready to laugh as a young ninja heads into the closet to meet the monster that’s been so scary night after night! But what if things aren’t what they seem and our monster isn’t scary at all? What if our ninja hero is about to make a friend of the strangest sort?

 

Int artwork from How to Catch a Monster

Interior spread from How to Catch a Monster written by Adam Wallace with illustrations by Andy Elkerton, Sourcebooks Jabberwocky ©2017.

 

CLICK HERE FOR A STORY TIME ACTIVITY KIT

 

Int spread from How to Catch a Monster

Interior spread from How to Catch a Monster written by Adam Wallace with illustrations by Andy Elkerton, Sourcebooks Jabberwocky ©2017.

BIO:

Adam Wallace is a children’s writer and cartoonist living in Australia. He is the author of the New York Times bestselling How to Catch series and Only You Can Save Christmas.

Andy Elkerton is a children’s book illustrator based in the United Kingdom.

 

Int image from How to Catch a Monster by Adam Wallace and Andy Elkerton

Interior spread from How to Catch a Monster written by Adam Wallace with illustrations by Andy Elkerton, Sourcebooks Jabberwocky ©2017.

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Best Books for Mother’s Day Roundup

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BEST CHILDREN’S BOOKS FOR MOTHER’S DAY

 

HAPPY MOTHER’S DAY 2016

Let’s get ready for the holiday today with this roundup of new books for children.

Canticos: Little Chickies Los Pollitos book coverCanticos: Little Chickies/Los Pollitos
by Susie Jaramillo
(Encantos Media; $14.99, Ages 0-5)
This adorable, sturdy board book, the first in a series, celebrates moms in a most unique way. Its format is reversible – an original Spanish version is on one side for both the enjoyment by native Spanish speakers and to encourage the early learning of a second language. Turn it over for an English adaption of this children’s nursery rhyme about little chicks being born and their devoted mama hen seeking food with which to feed them. She provides warmth when they’re cold and gives them all the love they deserve. Designed in accordion style with bright artwork and the simple story (no more that six words on a page) on both sides, the book can be read folded up or opened up in its entirety. Have your little ones try it both ways. Preschoolers will find all the interactive lift-the-flaps and spin-wheel features hard to resist. I know I did! A bonus – little ones can sing along with the Canticos: Los Pollitos App for smartphones and tablets. There are activities to keep your children busy and entertained for hours. For every Canticos book purchased, the company will donate books to preschool programs across the U.S. to help low-income families in need. Visit the website to see what other books are on the horizon. www.canticosworld.com

MamasaurusMamasaurus cover
Written and illustrated by Stephan Lomp
(Chronicle Books; $16.99, Ages 3-5)
Illustrator Stephan Lomp makes his picture book debut in Mamasauras as both author and illustrator. After Babysaurus slips off the back of Mamasaurus and loses sight of her, he embarks on a “Are You My Mother?” type journey through the wild jungle. As he encounters the offspring of various dinosaurs, Babysaurus is certain someone will have spotted her – after all she takes huge steps, has a wonderful long neck, is taller than the tallest tree and “She’s the biggest there is!” Using bold artwork (I like the white text against the black background) with some subtle humor, Lomp’s Mamasaurus is a fun addition to this Mother’s Day Roundup mix.

 

 

You Made Me a MotherYou Made Me a Mother
Written by Laurenne Sala
Illustrated by Robin Preiss Glasser
(HarperCollins BYR; $15.99, Ages 4-8)
This charming book, just perfect for Mother’s Day, opens with a mom-to-be waiting for the birth of her first child. “I followed advice. I read twelve books. I ate lots of spinach. Could you tell I was nervous?” The mother in this story expresses her love for her child, her desire to make him happy and the honest realization she’s not perfect, but willing to do all that’s in her heart to be there for her child. “I made you, but you made me a mother.” That powerful last line resonates with me and is a moving one to share with children. Sala has found an original way to present motherhood to youngsters with an economy of words and richness in spirit. Glasser’s touching illustrations add to the joy of this story making it a most delightful Mother’s Day read.

 

Our Love GrowsOur Love Grows cover image
Written and illustrated by Anna Pignataro
(Sourcebooks Jabberwocky; $16.99, Ages 4 and up)
Meet Panda Mama and her son Pip, together in a bamboo forest, the beautiful setting of this heartwarming story. Pip asks “Mama, when will be big?” And Mama explains, in the most poetic and touching of ways, how exactly when compared to nature, he has indeed grown while at the same time, so has her love for him. The things the mama panda points out to her son are so evocative and lovingly told in gentle rhyme. “Once this tree was smaller too. And the stars above were just a few. Your paw print was tiny in the snow, and every step was far to go.” Getting into the head of a panda isn’t easy, but Pignataro makes it seem that way with the imagery and examples. Kids will appreciate seeing the sweet owl plush toy Pip holds in most of the spreads and parents will enjoy the calming cadence of the text, likely choosing this as an ideal bedtime story that’s definitely not just for Mother’s Day as a mother’s love is year ’round.

  • Reviewed by Ronna Mandel

Additional Recommendations:

Ella The Elephant: Ella and the Mother’s Day Surprise (Grosset & Dunlap; $3.99, Ages 3-5)
My Mother My Heart: A Joyful Book to Color by Eleri Fowler (HarperCollins; $15.99)


Max the Brave by Ed Vere

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MAX THE BRAVE
Written and illustrated by Ed Vere
(Sourcebooks Jabberwocky; $16.99, Ages 3-6)

Autumn 2015 Kids’ Indie Next Pick!

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Today we welcome a feisty, fearless new feline into the memorable mix of kitty picture book characters kids adore. Meet Max the Brave, a black kitten (seen on the cover sporting a red super hero cape), keen to chase a mouse. The catch is, Max’s not sure what a mouse looks like.

IntartMaxtheBrave

Interior artwork from Max the Brave by Ed Vere, Sourcebooks Jabberwocky ©2015.

In this adorable and addictive book, described as a cross between Are You My Mother? and I Want My Hat Back, U.K. author and illustrator Ed Vere fills the pages with humorous attempt after attempt by Max to find the rodent. From an empty tin can to up in a tree, and from an elephant –

“Excuse me, but would you
happen to be Mouse?”

“Eeek, Mouse?!
I’m not Mouse, I’m Elephant,”
says Elephant.
“But I did just see Mouse skitter by.”

– to finally coming face to face with the mouse, but not knowing what he’s looking at, the laugh out loud moments build to an entertaining conclusion. Young readers will find themselves urging Max on, especially when he’s tricked by clever Mouse into believing that the nearby sleeping Monster is actually the mouse that Max has been seeking all along. The comedy that ensues when Max confronts the real monster (with pink toenails) adds to the action and excitement.

IntartMaxtheBrave

Interior artwork from Max the Brave by Ed Vere, Sourcebooks Jabberwocky ©2015.

This play on identities will also delight parents since many of the characters Max meets on his quest are those who either fear cats or mice. This great read feels like a classic cartoon where we, as the audience, may know the outcome, but delight in the journey.

Bright artwork, fabulous facial expressions on every cute creature Max encounters, along with short sentences placed pleasingly on every page work together making Max the Brave a picture book worthy of multiple reads and huge smiles.

  • Reviewed by Ronna Mandel

Great Poetry Books for Children

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 We Say Good-bye to National Poetry Month

We kicked off National Poetry Month with a terrific poetry book and we’ll end the month the same way!

Changescvr.jpgLet’s look at CHANGES: A Child’s First Poetry Collection by Charlotte Zolotow with illustrations by Tiphanie Beeke and an introduction by Zolotow’s daughter, writer Crescent Dragonwagon (Sourcebooks Jabberwocky; $16.99, Ages 3 and up). The late, great, award-winning author and poet, Charlotte Zolotow, wrote many of the poems I learned as a child. Perhaps you recall some of them, too.

Now with this collection of her seasonal poetry gathered together for the first time, you can share the 28 poems and watch youngsters experience the same joy you did upon hearing them years ago. The selection of poems begins with spring and finishes in winter. The book closes with a touching poem called So Will I that might even bring a tear to your eye as it did to mine. In this poem a young narrator recounts hearing his grandfather’s beautiful memories of nature from his youthful days. This poem, like the others, as Dragonwagon so aptly points out,  is “deceptively simple, transparent and refreshing as a glass of clean, clear, cold spring-water.” Drink up!

The opening poem, Change, with its subtle message, is one of my favorites. Here’s how it begins:

This summer
still hangs
heavy and sweet
with sunlight
as it did last year.

 

ChangesIntSpread1415.png

Interior artwork from Changes: A Child’s First Poetry Collection by Charlotte Zolotow with illustrations by Tiphanie Beeke and an introduction by Crescent Dragonwagon, Sourcebooks Jabberwocky ©2015.

In addition to Zolotow’s cyclical poems with evocative titles such as The Spring Wind, Crocus, By the Sea, Beetle, The Leaves and The First Snow, another treat of Changes: A Child’s First Poetry Collection is that it’s full of gorgeous illustrations. Beeke’s watercolor artwork is vibrant and cheerful, composed with a light touch and full heart. With each turn of the page, there’s something pleasing to look at whether it’s a small insect on a book in The Fly or a snowy woods teeming with life in Here.

In this centenary of Zolotow’s birth, it’s wonderful that we can celebrate her contribution to children’s literature, and recognize the brilliance of her poetry which continues to resonate today as strongly as it did when first written.

– Reviewed by Ronna Mandel

 


Flunked: Fairy Tale Reform School by Jen Calonita

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Flunked-Poison-Apples

Flunked: Fairy Tale Reform School
by Jen Calonita
(Sourcebooks Jabberwocky, $15.99, Ages 10+)

Middle Grade Novel Spotlight
featuring great giveaway opportunity on Rafflecopter.
Win one of five books! Enter today.

Advance Praise for Flunked: Fairy Tale Reform School

FLUNKED-cvr.jpg“Charming fairy-tale fun.” – Sarah Mlynowski, author of the Whatever After series.

“Flunked is spellbinding and wickedly clever. Gilly is smart, spunky, and a hilarious narrator!” – Leslie Margolis, author of the Annabelle Unleashed and the Maggie Brooklyn mysteries.

“Flunked is a fresh and funny take on the enchanted world. (And who hasn’t always wanted to know what happened to Cinderella’s stepmother?”)” – Julie DeVillers, author of the Trading Faces identical twin series and Emma Emmets, Playground Matchmaker.

“A reform school where all the teachers are former villains. Kinda writes itself, right?” – Betsy Bird’s Librarian Preview

Book Info:

OUR MISSION:

To turn WICKED DELINQUENTS
and FORMER VILLAINS
into FUTURE HEROES

Gilly wouldn’t call herself wicked exactly…but when you have five little brothers and sisters and live in a run- down boot, you have to get creative to make ends meet. Gilly’s a pretty good thief (if she does say so herself).

Until she gets caught.

Gilly’s sentenced to three months at Fairy Tale Reform School- where all of the teachers are former (super-scary) villains like the Big Bad Wolf, the Evil Queen, and Cinderella’s Wicked Stepmother. Harsh. But when she meets fellow students Jax and Kayla, she learns there’s more to this school than its heroic mission. There’s a battle brewing and Gilly has to wonder: can a villain really change?

AmazonJen Calonita | B&N | BAM |!ndigo | IndieBound

Jen Calonita is the author of the Secrets of My Hollywood Life series and other books like Sleepaway Girls and Summer State of Mind, but Fairy Tale Reform School is her first middle grade series. She rules Long Island, New York with husband Mike, princes Tyler and Dylan, and Chihuahua Captain Jack Sparrow, but the only castle she’d ever want to live in is Cinderella’s at Disney World. She’d love for you to drop her a line at jencalonitaonline.com or keep the fairy tale going at http://books.sourcebooks.com/enchantasia/

Website | Facebook | Twitter | Goodreads

Excerpt from Flunked: Fairy Tale Reform School –

There’s a boy up there, standing on the crystal chandelier! He has slightly curly blond hair and is wearing a uniform—­a navy sweater vest over a white shirt with khaki pants—­but his boots are muddy. He’s stepping on priceless crystals with cruddy boots? Is he insane?
“Jax! What are you doing up there?” Kayla whispers heatedly.
“I’m cleaning the crystal for Flora,” Jax says and rolls his eyes. “What does it look like I’m doing? I’m making
a break for it.”
Kayla applauds. “Yay! This time I know you can do it.”
I shade my eyes from the light bursting through the stained-­glass window next to the chandelier Jax is perched on. “Busting out? Why?” I ask Kayla. “I thought you said this place was cool.”
Jax laughs loudly and looks at me. I feel slightly stunned. I’ve never seen violet eyes before. “FTRS was fun for a while, but strange things have started happening and I don’t want to be here when something bad goes down.”
Strange things? What kind of strange things? Why does Kayla suddenly look pale?
“He’s exaggerating,” Kayla tells me, but she doesn’t sound convincing.
Drip. Whatever Jax is holding is leaking. Kayla and I move out of the way so we don’t get wet. “Grease,” Jax explains to me. “It lubes the window.” He swings the chandelier, and as it nears the window, he uses a fork to try to pry the window open. “A few more tries and I’ll have it.”
“Then what are you going to do, genius?” I ask. “You’re two stories up.”
Jax’s eyes gleam. “I’ve jumped from higher spots before.”
“It’s true,” Kayla says to me. “Jax once jumped from the gym to the dining hall turret. That was three stories up. We call him the Escape Artist. One time he even managed to break into Azalea and Dahlia’s rooms and borrowed their keys to the indoor pool so the whole dorm could take a midnight swim.”
“Impressive,” I tell him. “And I thought I was good at tricking obnoxious royals.”
“She stole a dragon’s tooth clip from one this morning,” Kayla fills him in.
“Nice,” Jax says. “Your first pull?”
“No, I’ve been doing it for a while,” I brag.
“Me too,” Jax says. “My father is a farmer. You can only get so far trading vegetables. I needed to kick things up a notch.”
For some reason, I don’t think any of us are going to make the transformation Headmistress Flora is looking for. “Why do you want to break out so bad?”
“I’ve got places to see, and Enchantasia isn’t one of them.” Jax swings the chandelier so hard the crystals clang together. The window latch pops open, and I watch Jax leap from the chandelier to the tiny window ledge. I’m in awe. Jax looks down at us smugly before pushing open the window. “Are you sure you two don’t want to join me?”
“There’s no time for us,” Kayla says. “Get out of here. Wait!” Her eyes widen. “You deactivated the alarm on the window, right?”
“There isn’t one,” Jax insists. “If there was, I wouldn’t be able to do this.” But when Jax lifts the window, we hear:
EEEEEE! EEEE! EEEE! Unauthorized exit! Unauthorized exit!
The shrieking sound is so intense that Kayla and I cover our ears. Within seconds, Flora is out of her office and running toward us.
Swoosh!
I feel something brush past me and I whirl around. When I look up at Jax again, a large, muscular man with a long mane of hair is hanging on to the window ledge, his furry hands pulling Jax back by his shirt. How did the man get up there without a ladder?
“Mr. Jax,” the man says in a low growl, “we really must stop meeting like this.”

Click here for the Fairy Tale Reform School Quiz:
If you get sentenced to Fairy Tale Reform School, it will help to have an ally. Take the quiz and find out who your mentor would be.

Rafflecopter HTML (Open 2/22-3/31) 5 Print Copies of Flunked: Fairy Tale Reform School

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HOW TO BAKE A BOOK by Ella Burfoot

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HOW TO BAKE A BOOK by Ella Burfoot
(Sourcebooks Jabberwocky, $16.99, Ages 3-7)

 How-to-Bake-a-Book-cvr.jpg

 

Do you like your stories sweet or savory? Prefer plots with a measure of mystery or a dollop of delight? According to the clever heroine in Ella Burfoot’s charming picture book, HOW TO BAKE A BOOK, it is easy as pie to follow the recipe for writing success!

In an adorably outfitted kitchen filled with baking implements and paper dolls, a girl sporting punctuation hair barrettes announces “I am going to bake a book!” She starts with words, big and small, carefully weighing, beating, whisking and mixing until the batter is just right. Rolling out the dough, she uses assorted cookie cutters to assemble a cast of characters, and adds a heaping spoonful of feelings, colors and sounds.

How-to-Bake-a-Book-int-spread.jpg

Interior artwork from How to Bake a Book by Ella Burfoot, Sourcebooks Jabberwocky, ©2014.

In bouncy rhyme she perseveres, “Next the middle, the action, the filling. Into the pan without any spilling.” Next “Turn up the heat— the bubbles quicken. And then my plot begins to thicken.” In the pantry she searches high atop a ladder, reaching the highest shelf for the proper punctuation. There, between the alphabet spaghetti and dried princess peas, she locates two shakers marked periods and capital letters.

Burfoot’s unique, imaginative tale is a creative introduction to kids learning how to develop a story from scratch. Young listeners will appreciate the light rhythm and rhyme, while older readers will find additional humor in the silly and significant images sprinkled throughout the illustrations.

Bright, cheerful colors make the original and witty images sparkle. Carefully placed text winds the reader’s eye through the “baking” instructions step by step. Mixed-media artwork is a special detail feature, highlighting all manner of textiles, drawings and papers throughout. The main character smiles happily as she stirs and glazes, sometimes miniaturized to row a teacup boat or to leap nimbly from bottle top to bottle top.

This wonderful, whimsical story will delight those who create and enjoy books, and open the door to fun and lighthearted discussions about the elements that make the best books especially delicious!

– (Tastefully) Reviewed by Cathy Ballou Mealey

Where Obtained:  I reviewed a promotional PDF file copy of HOW TO BAKE A BOOK and received no compensation. The opinions expressed here are my own.


Bad Dog Flash by Ruth Paul – Review & Giveaway

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Bad Dog Flash Review & Giveaway

An Autumn 2014 Kids’ Indie Next List Pick

Bad-Dog-Flash-cvr.jpgDogs will be dogs. They chase cats. They dig holes. They get excited to see you, and nearly knock you over. They’re not trying to be bad. They don’t want to make you mad, but sometimes they do. This sounds like some children I know!

In Bad Dog Flash, by award-winning NZ author and illustrator Ruth Paul, (Sourcebooks Jabberwocky, Oct. 7, 2014, $15.99, Ages 3-8), a scruffy rascally puppy named Flash, can’t seem to do anything right. He’s only playing with the cat when he chases her up a tree. Flash didn’t mean to break the window. He just wanted to bring his stick inside. Those shoes smelled so good, he couldn’t help but lick and chew them, and the laundry hanging on the line …

Swing. Drip. Slap. Drip. Slop, slip, flap, flip…rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrip! “Bad dog, Flash!”

… he couldn’t resist.

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Interior art from Bad Dog Flash by Ruth Paul, Sourcebooks Jabberwocky ©2014.

Flash continues to misbehave and be corrected, in this adorable picture book, until he’s sent to the dog house for a time out, and is one sad pup. I giggled at the smirk Ruth Paul put on the cat’s face every time Flash got in trouble. Her old-time illustrations remind me of the classic Tip and Mitten books by David McKee from my early childhood.

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Interior art from Bad Dog Flash by Ruth Paul, Sourcebooks Jabberwocky ©2014.

Her text, with its rhythm, rhyme, and repeating refrain of “Bad dog, Flash,” make this a perfect read-aloud book for toddlers, and a delightful early reader for older children. Children will relate to Flash, who always seems to get in trouble, and will like it even more when he’s invited back into the house to snuggle, and finally hears, “Good dog, Flash!”

– Reviewed by MaryAnne Locher

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