Ramadan by Hannah Eliot with illustrations by Rashin

Ramadan by Hannah Eliot with illustrations by Rashin

 

Ramadan book cover art

 

I’m happy to share Ramadan, the first book in a new board book series from Little Simon geared towards preschoolers called Celebrate The World. “The series aims to show readers how different cultures celebrate and cherish the holidays important to them.”

 

Ramandan int artwork 1

Interior artwork from Ramadan written by Hannah Eliot and illustrated by Rashin Kheiriyeh, Little Simon ©2018.

 

Alluding to the lunar calendar, Ramadan takes places in the ninth month of the year “when the crescent moon first appears in the sky …” With its 24 pages of ebullient illustrations, Ramadan is a cheerful and easy-to-understand introduction to the Islamic holiday observed by over a billion Muslims across the globe. Little ones learn that during the monthlong fast of Ramadan, eating occurs “only when it is dark outside,” and involves prayer, introspection and spending time with family and friends. Other important aspects of this holy holiday include being “thankful” and helping others. When the month has ended, Muslims celebrate Eid al-Fitr, also known as the Sweet Festival, for three days during which time they “pray” and “give each other gifts.”

 

Ramandan int artwork 1

Interior artwork from Ramadan written by Hannah Eliot and illustrated by Rashin Kheiriyeh, Little Simon ©2018.

 

Eliot has included just the right amount of information to pique a preschooler’s curiosity. The simple language that is used works perfectly with Rashin’s festive and upbeat artwork conveying the impression that both author and illustrator thoroughly enjoyed working on this book. That said, I have no doubt that readers will agree. The depiction of the crescent moon, the men kneeling in the mosque, and all the fabulous food scenes are sure to please. I look forward to all the other books in this series if they’re as well crafted as Ramadan. They’ll be popular for parents and educators alike for being a positive way to help youngsters understand and welcome traditions from near and afar.

  • Reviewed by Ronna Mandel

 

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