The Year of the Rooster: Tales from the Chinese Zodiac

THE YEAR OF THE ROOSTER:
TALES FROM THE CHINESE ZODIAC
Written by Oliver Chin
Illustrated by Juan Calle
(Immedium; $15.95, Ages 3-8)

 

Cover image from Oliver Chin's The Year of the Rooster

 

In The Year of the Rooster: Tales from the Chinese Zodiac, author Oliver Chin explains how “the Chinese culture has organized time in cycles of twelve years.” Based upon the movement of the moon, the Chinese calendar matches animals’ personalities with those of individuals born in a specific year.

 

Interior artwork from The Year of the Rooster: Tales from the Chinese Zodiac by Oliver Chin with illustrations by Juan Calle, Immedium ©2017.

 

This final picture book, #12 in the series, features a bilingual translation in simplified Chinese and introduces readers to Ray, a plucky young rooster and his loyal pal, Ying, the farmers’ daughter. After bumping into a pig who claims to have found a fantastic phoenix feather, the pair embark on a quest to find the elusive creature.

 

Interior artwork from The Year of the Rooster: Tales from the Chinese Zodiac by Oliver Chin with illustrations by Juan Calle, Immedium ©2017.

 

On their journey Ray and Ying also encounter a rat, an ox, a tiger, a rabbit, a dragon, a horse, a snake, a sheep, and a monkey who share their insights on the colorfully plumaged phoenix. As the friends hunt far and wide, Ray is also learning to perfect his crow, something his father has demonstrated early in the story. The significance of meeting a phoenix is raised by the snake who tells the youngsters that “seeing the phoenix is good luck. If you find her, your quest will be well worth it.” But how long must the two travel when it seems that every new animal they meet requires them to trek even further? And if they do eventually find the phoenix, will their quest truly have been worth the effort?

 

Interior artwork of phoenix, Ray and Ying from The Year of the Rooster

Interior artwork from The Year of the Rooster: Tales from the Chinese Zodiac by Oliver Chin with illustrations by Juan Calle, Immedium ©2017.

 

Along with its playful text and easy to follow storyline, The Year of the Rooster’s  dazzling illustrations by Juan Calle offer children adorable cartoon-like characters to connect with. As the need for diverse books remains strong, Chin’s book is an important reminder of how invaluable reading and learning about other cultures and traditions is for growing young minds. The Chinese New Year is always a great entrée into the Chinese culture and Chin’s books, as well as all of Immedium’s titles, continue to provide this engaging content. Wishing you all a very Happy Year of the Rooster!

  • Reviewed by Ronna Mandel

The Year of the Horse: Tales from the Chinese Zodiac by Oliver Chin

Cover of The Year of the Horse by Oliver Chin

The Year of the Horse: Tales from the Chinese Zodiac by Oliver Chin with illustrations by Jennifer Wood, Immedium, 2014.

Ring in the 2014 Chinese New Year with Oliver Chin’s The Year of the Horse: Tales from the Chinese Zodiac (Immedium, $15.95, Ages 3-8), illustrated by Jennifer Wood and reviewed today by Ronna Mandel.

Mark your calendars L.A. readers. The illustrator, Jennifer Wood, will be at Kidspace Children’s Museum on 2/1/14 for a reading and signing of the book. She’ll be at Vromans in Pasadena on
2/8/14, at 10:30 a.m.

Did you know that the Chinese New Year is a 15 day holiday based on the movement of the moon, and is organized in cycles of 12 years?  The way the years get named comes from the Chinese zodiac which is made up of 12 animals, each with unique qualities, and each belonging to certain years. I discovered that I was born in The Year of the Dog, but that’s a whole ‘nother story! The Chinese culture believes that if your birth year falls under a particular animal, both you and that animal should share the same personality traits.

interior artwork from The Year of the Horse: Tales from the Chinese Zodiac written by Oliver Chin

Interior artwork Copyright © 2014 Jennifer Wood from The Year of the Horse: Tales from the Chinese Zodiac, written by Oliver Chin, Immedium, 2014.

In The Year of the Horse, ninth in the Tales from the Chinese Zodiac series, readers will meet Hannah, a foal and Tom, the boy who befriends her. Together the two play whenever they can and grow close as Hannah grows stronger. When Tom’s teacher Lao Shi is requested to paint something special for the Governor, she worries how the artwork will be delivered to the capital so far away.  Tom volunteers, but Lao Shi tells him, “The journey is too long and wild to walk alone … Someone must go with you.” Since the picture book is titled The Year of the Horse, it may come as no surprise then to children that Hannah is eager to be considered capable of the task and partner with Tom on the journey.

However, getting to the capital safely is not easy. Hannah’s parent advise her, “Dear, keep on the path and stay alert.” And while both Tom and Hannah are responsible, little do they know what challenges await them on their trip.  Wood, an animation designer at Nickelodeon, brings her vivid, kid-friendly style to The Year of the Horse, making every page feel like a scene from a TV show. Kids will love the look of the various animals included in the story including an ox, a dog, a sheep, a dragon, a tiger, a snake and a monkey. They’ll also get easily caught up in the adventure Chin’s created. After some very close calls, Tom and Hannah arrive at the capital and deliver to the Governor the scroll Lao Shi’s painted. Once home, the two are welcomed and cheered. Hannah’s displayed valiant spirit as has Tom. They “blazed their own trail” and succeeded. No wonder the Year of the Horse celebrates their derring-do. I loved the positive “can-do” message the book conveyed, and though our kids are not going to be sent on such a mission, they’ll enjoy the vicarious experience and understand the pride that Lao Shi and Hannah’s parents feel about the pair’s major accomplishment.

Interior artwork Copyright © 2014 Jennifer Wood from The Year of the Horse: Tales from the Chinese Zodiac, written by Oliver Chin, Immedium, 2014.

Interior artwork Copyright © 2014 Jennifer Wood from The Year of the Horse: Tales from the Chinese Zodiac, written by Oliver Chin, Immedium, 2014.

Do you share those qualities with Tom and Hannah or know someone who does? According to the back matter in the book, “People born in the Year of the Horse are energetic and animated. They are proud and love attention … ”

 

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