The Legend of Rock, Paper, Scissors by Drew Daywalt

Posted on

 

THE LEGEND OF ROCK, PAPER, SCISSORS
Written by Drew Daywalt
Illustrated by Adam Rex
(Balzer + Bray; $17.99, Ages 4-8)

 

Cover image from The Legend of Rock Paper Scissors by Drew Daywalt

 

The Legend of Rock, Paper, Scissors, a forty-eight-page picture book by Drew Daywalt (author of the best-selling Crayons books), has universal appeal and charismatic humor. The origins of this famous three-way clash are brilliantly explained.

We are introduced to mighty Rock, a fearless fighter who lives in “an ancient and distant realm called the Kingdom of the Backyard.” He’s feeling down because it’s no fun to win all the time. In encounters with a clothespin and an apricot, we see why this is a problem.

Meanwhile, clever Paper, from the Empire of Mom’s Home Office, is also an undefeated champ when tangling with enemies in his part of the house. Even the printer proves to be no equal—Paper effectively jams him up.

Speedy Scissors resides in the tiny village of Junk Drawer, but that doesn’t mean she won’t slay adversaries throughout the Kitchen Realm. It’s about time someone put an end to those dinosaur-shaped chicken nuggets; Scissors was up to the task, but, as with the other two great warriors, being victorious 24/7 sure can get old.

When the three meet, an epic encounter ensues with each participant bested by one of the others—a battle which, to this day, is still reenacted.

Daywalt’s rollicking text pairs seamlessly with best-selling author and illustrator Adam Rex’s art. The three protagonists project personality and charm, irresistible in their unique magnificence. Together, Daywalt and Rex make this story terrifically true. How else could Rock, Paper, Scissors have come into existence? Hail to this modern-day legend.

Click here for a printable activity.

Click here for a reading sample.

 

  • Reviewed by Christine Van Zandt

Writer, editor, and owner of Write for Success www.Write-for-Success.com

@WFSediting, Christine@Write-for-Success.com


A Truly Colorful Crayon Tale

Posted on

51E7nP9Xi-L._SX225_Hitting shelves this June is The Day the Crayons Quit by Drew Daywalt and illustrated by Oliver Jeffers (Philomel Books; $17.99; ages 3-8). Reviewer Rita Zobayan couldn’t peel herself away!

Art comes to life in the delightful new picture book. Duncan simply wants to color, but a stack of 12 letters in his school desk reveals that his crayons have feelings and opinions on not only his use of color, but also on their own relationships with each other. Poor Pink is tired of being relegated as only a “girls’ color” and demands usage! Green is quite content with its lot in life, but is worried about other crayons. Blue is appreciative, but exhausted from coloring oceans and skies. And, boy-oh-boy, will your child laugh out loud when Peach’s dilemma is revealed!

Humor, imagination, and a great sense of children’s language combine to make up the content of the letters, and each letter is cleverly illustrated in a child’s handwriting style. Here is Red Crayon’s communication to Duncan:

Hey Duncan,

It’s me, Red Crayon. We NEED to talk. You make me work harder than any of your other crayons. All year long I wear myself out coloring fire engines, apples, strawberries and EVERYTHING ELSE that’s RED. I even work on holidays! I have to color all the Santas at Christmas and all the hearts on Valentine’s Day! I NEED A REST!

                  Your overworked friend,

Red Crayon

Meanwhile, Yellow and Orange are feuding! Yellow states that Duncan needs to “tell Orange Crayon that I am the color of the sun…” and Orange fires back that Duncan should “please tell Mr. Tattletale that he IS NOT the color of the sun.” Both have coloring book evidence to prove their claims! What is Duncan to do?!

TheDaytheCrayonsQuit_interior_19The illustrations are spot on: you really believe that you’re looking at a child’s art. They creatively capture each of the crayons’ dilemmas—even Purple’s assertion that if Duncan doesn’t “start coloring inside the lines soon…I am going to COMPLETELY LOSE IT.”

The Day the Crayons Quit is a great read, and artist or not, children will delight in the humorous premise and colorful artwork.

For other Oliver Jeffers books, click here. Click the titles for our reviews of Stuck and This Moose Belongs to Me.