Can Somebody Please Scratch My Back? by Jory John

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CAN SOMEBODY PLEASE SCRATCH MY BACK?
Written by Jory John
Illustrated by Liz Climo
(Dial BYR; $16.99, Ages 4-8)

 

Cover illustration from Can Somebody Please Scratch My Back?

 

Can Somebody Please Scratch My Back?  by Jory John is a great rainy day read aloud for energized kids swinging rain boots and in need of a good giggle while they’re more than likely required to sit, sit, sit in the classroom.

In this story we meet a delightfully frustrated and itchy Elephant desperate for a good back scratch. We all know how good that feels! Elephant groans every time a new friend tries to help. But the bumps, tickles, fangs and other animals’ offerings are far from what our poor pachyderm protagonist needs. When he’s reached his limit and sits down to sob over his situation, a friendly hedgehog comes by.

Hedgehog would love to help, and his body is the perfect level of pokey-ness for the task at hand. Elephant lifts Hedgehog by the trunk and uses him as a back scratcher, gaining immediate relief. So much relief, in fact, that he sighs in utter euphoria and absentmindedly flings Hedgehog away by the trunk.

And now poor Hedgehog is stuck—belly up—in the ground by the very pokey part of his body that previously helped the Elephant. Not only is he stuck, but his belly starts to itch. Won’t anyone help him out? In the bright of day, Sloth notices Hedgehog’s dilemma and offers to help.

Climo’s cartoon illustrations and bubbled read-aloud thoughts of each animal attempting to help the itchy Elephant are silly, fun and perfect for the intended audience. What a great LOL combination!

Read Can Somebody Please Scratch My Back? to find out if Sloth can make it in time to deliver Hedgehog from his agony.

Read a review of Jory John’s Bad Seed.

  • Reviewed by Ozma Bryant

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The Rabbit Listened by Cori Doerrfeld

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THE RABBIT LISTENED
Written and illustrated by Cori Doerrfeld
(Dial BYR; $17.99, Ages 3-5)

 

Cover image from The Rabbit Listened by Cori Doerrfeld

 

Starred Reviews – Kirkus Reviews, Publishers Weekly

THE RABBIT LISTENED by Cori Doerrfeld is a book that, as a preschool teacher, I want to thrust into parents’ hands to read over and over again with their preschool/TK/Kinder children. Quick to the point, with language that works around a universal issue that children (and adults) must handle, while not talking down to the intended audience.

Emotional intelligence, empathy, the very things we need so much in this world, resonate loudly and clearly in this gorgeous story. Doerrfeld’s illustrations are touching and relatable throughout each character’s struggle to cope with the problem at hand.

 

Int. artwork of bear from The Rabbit Listened by Cori Doerrfeld

Interior spread from The Rabbit Listened, written and illustrated by Cori Doerrfeld, Dial Book BYR, ©2018.

 

The young protagonist, Taylor, has built something from his imagination that took no little skill to master with his hands. He’s worked so hard on his block creation, only to have it knocked down in a rubble of despair and lost hope. His animal friends want to help. They want to fix, throw away, remind him of better creations yet to come. Taylor, however, doesn’t need this. The animals all walk away, frustrated by their inability to help him, missing an opportunity to connect with his pain.

Then rabbit hops over. Rabbit is quiet. Rabbit listens. Rabbit doesn’t tell Taylor how or when or why he should get over his loss. Rabbit is there, and stays with the boy throughout his processing of an event gone wrong. And when the young protagonist is ready to rebuild again, rabbit is there to support him.

 

Int image of Taylor and Rabbit from The Rabbit Listened by Cori Doerrfeld ©2018.

Interior spread from The Rabbit Listened, written and illustrated by Cori Doerrfeld, Dial Book BYR, ©2018.

 

How often do we seek comfort from someone and get the opposite from a well meaning heart? Sometimes we simply need to be allowed our feelings, our disappointment and ill thoughts. Then, and only then, when we are ready, can we consider beginning again.

I recommend this book highly for anyone who struggles to help a child cope when they are just not READY for all the suggestions on how to move forward.

Give them the time and space.

Give them permission to vent.

Support them when they are ready to build again. And always listen.

  • Reviewed by Ozma Bryant

 

 


How to Grow a Dinosaur – An Interview with Author Jill Esbaum

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HOW TO GROW A DINOSAUR
Written by Jill Esbaum and illustrated by Mike Boldt
(Dial Books for Young Readers; $17.99; Ages 2-5)

Cover illustration from How to Grow a Dinosaur by Jill Esbaum

 

If you’re looking for a gift for a child who is about to become an older sibling, look no further than Jill Esbaum’s hilarious and practical guide to big siblinghood, HOW TO GROW A DINOSAUR with artwork by Mike Boldt. Here’s a description from Penguin Random House:

Good news: Your mom’s hatching a baby! Bad news: Babies take their sweet time. And when the baby finally hatches? He’s too little to play! He mostly screeches, eats, burps, sleeps, and poops. He doesn’t even know he’s a dinosaur! That’s where you come in. You can teach the baby just about everything–from peek-a-boo to roaring to table manners to bedtime. Growing a dinosaur is a big job, but you’re perfect for it. Why? Because one thing your baby brother wants more than anything . . . is to be just like you.

INTERVIEW: I was lucky enough to sit down for a chat (via Facebook Messenger) with Jill to talk about the book, finding time to write, and the perks of being a kidlit author.

Colleen Paeff: I love the way HOW TO GROW A DINOSAUR is playful and funny, but it’s also a legitimate how-to guide for older siblings. Did the manuscript start out that way or did it evolve over time?

Jill Esbaum: Thanks, Colleen! That evolved over time. I wrote it to be a simple, entertaining book, but it sort of took on a life of its own. My editor grabbed onto the possibilities right away.

CP: Did you send it to your agent first or did it go straight to your editor?

JE: I sent it to my agent, Tricia Lawrence. I had my Dial editor, Jessica Dandino Garrison, in mind, though, and asked Tricia to send it to her first. It seemed like the kind of goofy humor she might like.

CP: So, you had worked with this editor before?

JE: Yes. We had worked together on both I HATCHED and I AM COW, HEAR ME MOO!

CP: Is it easier to work on something with an editor you’ve worked with before?

JE: Definitely, because you (sorta) know what might work for her/him and what probably
won’t.

interior artwork from How to Grow a Dinosaur

Interior spread by Mike Boldt from How to Grow a Dinosaur by Jill Esbaum, Dial BYR ©2018

 

CP: How long was the process from first draft to publication for HOW TO GROW A DINOSAUR?

JE: I sent it to Tricia in May of 2015, and by October we had an offer. The process didn’t really start until March, when the contract was finally buttoned up. So March, 2016, to January, 2018. Not bad.

CP: Is that faster than usual? Or is that normal for you?

JE: That was about the same as my other recent books. I once waited nearly 5 years, though, so 2 years felt like lightning speed. My last 5 (or so) books have all been about 2 to 2 and a half years from sale to publication.

CP: Wow. That seems fast!

JE: Still seems fast to me, too. My earlier books were mostly 3-year books.

CP: I’m curious about the ratio of stories you write to stories you sell. Do you have many manuscripts in the proverbial “drawer” or do you sell most of what you write?

JE: That’s hard to say right now. My agent has 6-7 picture book manuscripts that started to make the rounds last year. Considering my entire career, though, I suppose I sell…50% of what I write? That’s probably just because I refuse to give up on some that deserve the drawer. I can’t help tinkering with rejected stories in hopes of making them irresistible the next time out. That persistence has often paid off for me. An offer came in last month for a picture book that had been rejected 7-8 times since I wrote it in 2014.

CP: Do you usually work on one project at a time or several?

JE: Several. Right now, I have a chapter book, 3 picture book manuscripts, and a nonfiction project all front and center on my computer desktop.

interior artwork from How to Grow a Dinosaur

Interior spread by Mike Boldt from How to Grow a Dinosaur by Jill Esbaum, Dial BYR ©2018

 

CP: Are you someone who writes every day or do you have a more flexible schedule? And how do you squeeze it in around farm work, grandchildren, school visits, and teaching a summer writing workshop?!

JE: I don’t feel like I’ve been doing a very good job of it lately, honestly. Working on that. But I can’t always make writing my priority. Family comes first, always. One thing that has also been squeezing out writing time lately is handling the business side of being published. I don’t love it, and it’s a huge time suck. Long, leisurely days of “Hmm, what should I work on first?” are VERY few and far between, these days.

CP: But it seems like you’re so prolific!

JE: I don’t feel that way. I always feel like I should be writing more. For instance, I wrote a quick draft of a new picture book and sent it to my online critique group about 10 days ago. They’ve all weighed in, and I’m chomping at the bit to start tweaking. But I haven’t yet been able to make the time. Part of that is because I have a new book out and am doing my best to promote it, including my first-ever launch party this next weekend. Partly it’s because the flu sidelined a grandson’s babysitter, so I stepped in there. Grammy duty is one of the best parts of my life!

CP: Is hanging out with your grandkids a big source of inspiration for you?

JE: It is! And I hadn’t really expected that. My fingers are tightly crossed for a project going to its final yes/no meeting next month that springs entirely from a moment I experienced while babysitting my granddaughter. Crazy.

CP: I know you write both fiction and nonfiction. Do you have a soft spot for one over the other?

JE: I suppose I have a soft spot for fiction, but only because that comes entirely from my own imagination, and it’s a blast to see that come to life. I love writing nonfiction, too, because all the information I need is easily available to me, and all I have to do is figure out a way to make it engaging for kiddos.

CP: Let’s get back to HOW TO GROW A DINOSAUR. I love the parts in the story where the text is vague, but the illustrations show something alarming, or moving, or downright hilarious. Did your manuscript go to the illustrator with art notes or was that all him?

JE: I did include brief art notes here and there. But much of it was left for the illustrator’s imagination. I don’t think I had an art note for the page in which the baby dino is teething on the cat. And that turned out to be one of my favorite illustrations.

CP: Yes! I love that one. And I love the one where the big brother roars and scares the baby. They both look so sad.

JE: I feel very fortunate that both Jessica and the illustrator, Mike Boldt, understood what I was trying to do.

 

How to Grow a Dinosaur interior spread

Interior spread by Mike Boldt from How to Grow a Dinosaur by Jill Esbaum, Dial BYR ©2018

 

CP: Do you have a favorite unexpected detail?

JE: My favorited unexpected detail is that Mike inserted picture books here and there with titles that are plays on books of his or mine. There’s I Don’t Want To Be a Stegosaurus (from his book with Dev Petty, I Don’t Want To Be a Frog); I Hatched; and I Am T. Rex, Hear Me Roar! (from my I Am Cow, Hear Me Moo!) Too funny. Illustrators are brilliant.

CP: Yes! I love those, too. And I love how all the illustrations in the books are dinosaurs. It’s so clever. Did you see any artwork while it was in process or did you have to wait until it was complete?

JE: I did get to see the black and white sketches. It was obvious even then that this one would be special.

CP: Do you sometimes feel a sense of trepidation when you give up your manuscript to an illustrator?

JE: No, I never feel that way. I’m always excited to see what they bring to the story. Seeing their sketches feels like unwrapping a gift.

CP: What’s next for you?

JE: I have a couple of nonfiction books coming out in March. Picture book-wise, two projects are in the pipeline that I can’t yet talk about. And my fingers are tightly crossed for a third. Meanwhile, I’ll be writing whenever I can squeeze it in. Enough of that, and projects eventually get finished.

CP: What do you wish you’d known when you first started writing for children?

JE: I don’t think there’s anything I can say I wish I’d known. Getting to this point in my career has been one long, slow learning process, of course. But I can’t wish I’d had shortcuts, because everything that’s happened has made me a stronger writer.

CP: That’s good to know!

JE: The BEST thing that’s happened in the past 20 years: If anybody had told me, early on, that in 20 years I’d have this many amazing and talented author/illustrator friends all over the globe I would have thought that person was nuts. I mean, I live in Iowa; how would I meet them? Ha. Enter the internet. And SCBWI conferences and literature festivals. Meeting so many terrific book people has been one of the highlights of my life.

CP: It’s definitely one of the perks of this business. Thanks so much for doing this, Jill!

JE: Thanks, Colleen! I enjoyed it.

  • Interview by Colleen Paeff

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