Nadia, The Girl Who Couldn’t Sit Still by Karlin Gray

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NADIA: THE GIRL WHO COULDN’T SIT STILL
Written by Karlin Gray
Illustrated by Christine Davenier
(Houghton Mifflin Harcourt; $17.99, Ages 6-9)

 

Nadia by Karlin Gray cover photo

 

Nadia: The Girl Who Couldn’t Sit Still introduces us to Nadia Comaneci in the village of Oneşti, Romania, when Nadia is a young girl. In the humorous, vibrant illustrations, the reader experiences Nadia’s love of climbing trees and her impatient and fearless attempts at roller skating and bicycle riding. When Nadia clambers up the family’s Christmas tree and sends it toppling over, Nadia’s parents sign her up for gymnastics lessons.

 

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Interior artwork from Nadia: The Girl Who Couldn’t Sit Still by Karlin Gray with illustrations by Christine Davenier, HMH ©2016.

 

From there, Nadia is spotted one day at school by gymnastics coach, Bela Karolyi, and joins his new gymnastics school. Six-year-old Nadia diligently practices her moves until she masters them. We are shown her failures during early competitions but Nadia perseveres and makes the 1976 Romanian Olympic team. In this competition, though Nadia shines, the audience is astounded when her score reads only 1.00. We soon discover the scoreboard had not been programmed to display numbers above 9.99. Instead of a 1.00, Nadia had scored a perfect 10.00! She goes on to repeat her astounding score seven more times, winning five Olympic medals.

Though parents may be familiar with the story of Nadia Comaneci, Nadia: The Girl Who Couldn’t Sit Still retells Nadia’s story in an approachable manner for a new generation. Children will follow Nadia’s journey up to age fourteen, when she wins Olympic gold. Nadia grows from a girl who can’t sit still to one who learns to harness and direct that energy. She gives new meaning to the old adage, “practice makes perfect.”

 

Nadia by Karlin Gray interior image of Olympics

Interior artwork from Nadia: The Girl Who Couldn’t Sit Still by Karlin Gray with illustrations by Christine Davenier, HMH ©2016.

 

When the 2016 Summer Olympics open, families will be following gymnastics teams and rooting for their favorites. Reading Nadia’s story is an inspirational and timely accompaniment.

Read more about author Karlin Gray here.
Read more about illustrator Christine Davenier here.

  • Reviewed by Christine Van Zandt

Writer, editor, and owner of Write for Success www.Write-for-Success.com

@WFSediting, Christine@Write-for-Success.com

Co-editor of and writer for SCBWI’s Kite Tales https://SCBWIKiteTales.wordpress.com/

 


Dear Santa, Love, Rachel Rosenstein

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DEAR SANTA,
LOVE, RACHEL ROSENSTEIN
Written by Amanda Peet and Andrea Troyer
Illustrated by Christine Davenier
(Doubleday Books for Young Readers: $17.99, Ages 3-7)

 

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(NOTE: Sing to the tune of If You’re Happy and You Know It) … If you’re Jewish and love Christmas raise your hand!
My hand goes up as does the titular Rachel Rosenstein’s in the delightful Dear Santa, Love, Rachel Rosenstein. And while the title certainly gives away the premise, the execution of this story is so entertaining it’s certain to keep readers turning the pages. In fact, this reader felt as though the story was written with her daughter in mind. Growing up in Frankfurt, Germany, my daughter yearned for all things Christmas, especially when the start of Hanukkah fell close to Christmas.

In this charming picture book with Davenier’s cheerful and atmospheric watercolor artwork which fans of Julie Andrews’s The Very Fairy Princess series may recognize, it’s easy to see why all Rachel wants for Hanukkah is Christmas. Shops are full of enticingly decorated windows, glowing stars light up the streets, pine trees and wreaths are everywhere with no sign of a Menorah, especially on Rachel’s street. “The Rosensteins didn’t celebrate Christmas because they were Jewish. Being Jewish was fun most of the time.” Rachel knew there were plenty of wonderful holidays and reasons to celebrate in Judaism, yet still yearned to share the accoutrements of the Christmas season. She wanted to string lights or have a tree, but her family wouldn’t give in to her requests.

The story’s humor kicks in full force when Rachel secretly writes a letter to Santa, then meets him in person and asks if he’s coming to her house. This is the part I can see parents having fun with when they read Dear Santa, Love, Rachel Rosenstein aloud. Like my daughter used to do, Rachel prepared the house with high hopes for Santa’s arrival, but alas he never came. Rather than leave young readers disappointed about Saint Nick’s no show, Peet and Troyer end this tale on a positive note, with the Jewish tradition of going out for a Chinese meal. There, to Rachel’s surprise, she sees “some familiar faces: Lucy Deng from her class, and Mike Rashid and Amina Singh.” It turns out that Rachel’s not the only one who doesn’t celebrate Christmas! I believe children, both Jewish and non-Jewish, will enjoy this picture book, whether or not they share Rachel’s sentiment because it gently and humorously depicts a different perspective of Christmas than what is typically in books. And I can raise my hand to that!

    • Reviewed by Ronna Mandel

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Follow Your Heart

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The Very Fairy Princess Follows Her Heart ($16.99, Little, Brown Books for Young Readers, ages 4-8) by Julie Andrews and Emma Walton Hamilton with illustrations by Christine Davenier is yet another hit from this successful mother daughter team. The Very Fairy Princess is a popular series and this latest one’s just in time for Valentine’s Day.

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Gerry, with plenty of sparkle inside and even more enthusiasm to share on the outside, is excited because one of her favorite holidays is just around the corner and she’s got a FABULOUS idea. Deciding to create a bunch of individualized, glittery and feathery Valentine’s Day cards (perfectly illustrated by Davenier) for her family and friends, Gerry sets to work. But, as fate has it, on the big day she accidentally grabs the wrong folder and takes her Daddy’s instead. Imagine the HORROR when it’s her turn to hand out the special cards. After comforting from her caring teacher Miss Pym, Gerry finds an original solution to her dilemma and everyone ends up EXTREMELY happy, especially Gerry when her Daddy shows up to save the day!  Eager for more info about the Julie Andrews Collection? Click here to find out more.

For this Valentine’s Day we’re also reading:

Apple Cake: A Recipe For Love written and illustrated by Julie Paschkis ($16.99, Harcourt, ages  4-8)

Hugs and Kisses by Rachel Hale ($6.99, LBKids, ages 1-4) 

Who Needs Love?  by Elise Primavera with illustrations by Laura Park ($16.99, Robin Corey Books, ages 5-8)

We Go Together:  A Curious Collection of Affectionate Verse by Calef Brown  ($9.99, Houghton Mifflin Books for Kids, ages 4-8)