The Dog’s Guide to Your Happiness for International Day of Happiness

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THE DOG’S GUIDE TO YOUR HAPPINESS:
Seven Secrets for a Better Life From Man’s Best Friend
by Garry McDaniel & Sharon Massen
(Lumina Media; $19.99, also available as an eBook)

 

cover image from The Dog's Guide to Your Happiness

 

In addition to being the first day of spring, today is International Day of Happiness! Motivational speaker and author Garry McDaniel shares his Five Tips for a Happy Life from Man’s Best Friend based on his new book, The Dog’s Guide to Your Happiness.

Five Tips for a Happy Life from Man’s Best Friend

Ask anyone what their goal is in life and their answer will probably be, “To be happy.”

If our dogs could talk, they would share five reasons we can improve our happiness through their example. Here is a brief summary of what they would say.

1. “You can count on me.”

When we ask pet owners what they admire most about their dog, loyalty is usually first on the list. Loyalty is the confidence that you can count on others to be true to you and do the right thing even if it is difficult and even if you are not present. Dogs are loyal to their pack and display amazing loyalty to their owners. So Tip # 1 on the list of things we can do to increase our own happiness is to ensure we are loyal so we strengthen our relationships with others.

2. “Tell me your problems.”
Dogs are among the best listeners ever! You can spend hours talking to your dog and he or she will hang on every word. This is not usually the case for our friends, associates, or even family members. Tip # 2 then, is to take time to listen to others and make sure you understand what they have to say before you share your point of view.

3. “Let’s play!”
One of the best things about dogs is their curiosity and desire to play. Tip # 3- step outside of your daily routine, take the dog out for a walk, and pledge to have at least one experience a week that is just plain ‘fun’.

4. “I forgive you.”
Even if you come home late, skip a walk, run out of their favorite treat, or accidently step on their tail, your dog will not hold a grudge against you. Humans, on the other hand, can hold on to real or imagined insults forever! All this does is create stress and keep us from moving on with our lives. Tip # 4 – let go of bitterness and resentment toward yourself or others.

5. “I love you no matter what.”
Our work environment and educational system are based on the carrot and stick; “do this for me and I’ll give you that.” Unfortunately, this approach often carries over to our relationships and we begin to place conditions on our affections with others. Dogs love you whether you are young, old, rich, poor, fat, skinny, covered with hair or bald as they come. Tip # 5 – love with an open heart and expect nothing from others in return for giving yours.

Garry McDaniel and Sharon Massen speak nationally on what individuals and organizations can learn from dogs about leadership, team building, and customer service. Their book is The Dog’s Guide to Your Happiness: Seven Secrets for a Better Life from Man’s Best Friend.

Garry McDaniel is an award-winning professor teaching graduate and undergraduate courses in business management. McDaniel has written books on leadership strategy, con ict management, and is a frequent speaker in the United States and internationally on topics such as leadership development, employee engagement, personal and organizational change, life balance, and what humans and businesses can learn from dogs to improve their lives. He is currently available to discuss personal life coaching, training, or speaking engagements.


Goodnight, Numbers by Danica McKellar

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GOODNIGHT, NUMBERS
Written by Danica McKellar
Illustrated by Alicia Padrón
(Crown Books for Young Readers; $16.99, Ages 2-5)

 

Cover image of Danica McKellar's Goodnight Numbers

 

Math lover, author and mom of five, Lucy Ravitch, recently read Goodnight, Numbers with her family and today shares her thoughts on best-selling author, Danica McKellar’s latest book. Remember to also check out Lucy’s website, Kids Math Teacher, here.

McKellar’s newest book (it came out last week), provides a fun, hands-on approach to counting. This nod to Goodnight, Moon offers up multiple bedtime opportunities for your kids to count up to ten and learn their individual numbers. Each page presents the number both in written form, and numerically giving little ones the perfect way to practice tracing with their fingers.

Now find out more about Goodnight, Numbers in Lucy’s enlightening video, then read on.

As you go through the spreads and explore the scenes with your kids, they’ll discover several groupings of items. If not, point them out. Some are easy to spot while others can be more difficult. In fact, that’s actually a great way to keep slightly older kids interested. My four- and five-year-old kids enjoyed looking through Padrón’s illustrations to see if they could find ALL the grouped items. Did your kids notice the three sofa cushions in the video?  As you saw in the video, I do suggest this book for children ages 0-6, but only if you really want to introduce numbers early. Otherwise it is ideal for ages 2+. It would be such a super idea for Crown Books for Young Readers to make Goodnight, Numbers into a board book that would be durable enough to withstand the hours of engagement this book will surely have over its lifetime. Pick up a copy at your local independent bookstore today. Happy counting!

  • Reviewed by Lucy Ravitch

Go Big or Go Gnome by Kirsten Mayer

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GO BIG OR GO GNOME
Written by Kirsten Mayer
Illustrated by Laura K. Horton
(Imprint, $16.99, Ages 3-7)

is reviewed today by Cathy Ballou Mealey.  

 

Cover image of Go Big or Go Gnome by Kirsten Mayer

 

 

There may be princess stories and fairy tales a plenty, but good goblin or troll tales can be difficult to find. Now Go Big or Go Gnome, written by Kirsten Mayer and illustrated by Laura K. Horton provides a lighthearted and entertaining look at life from a verdantly impish perspective.

A tiny gnome named Al lives and works in a lush green garden. He trims shrubbery alongside a crew of friendly fellows who bathe birds, fluff dandelions, and rake rocks. While the gnomes keep busy tidying the sweet scenery, they are also grooming impressive “imperial beards and illustrious mustaches.” Everyone, that is, except Al. Al has nary a whisker on his smooth pink cheeks. This bothers Al tremendously, because he dreams of participating in the Beards International Gnome-athlon.

Desperate times call for desperate measures, so Al attempts to enter the contest by faking a beard using tiny white butterflies. They fly away and expose his trickery, so he tries again with a squirrel tail, and then with some moss. Thinking he’s doomed to be a plain, bare-faced gnome forever, Al heads home to trim some topiary and keep himself busy. Luckily he still has his clippers in hand when his best friend Gnorm has an emergency – sap is stuck in his beard! He snips, clips and trims Gnorm’s whiskers into an award-winning look. What will the other gnomes think of Al now?

Mayer’s sweet and upbeat tale is a funny fantasy addition to the beard-book genre. Clever language and gnomish word puns add to the appeal. Her text is a delightful set-up for illustrator Horton, who maximizes the opportunity to create inventive, elaborate and impressive beard styles on a pleasant array of diminutive creatures. She also establishes a imaginative garden setting accented with birds, flowers and mushrooms, using a green and blue palette that offsets the gnomes’ de rigueur red pointed caps and boots.

Clever and cute, Go Big or Go Gnome is an encouraging tale for young readers in search of their special talents and ready to embrace their true selves far before they reach the whisker-sprouting years.

 

  • Reviewed by Cathy Ballou Mealey

Where Obtained:  I reviewed a preview copy of Go Big or Go Gnome from the publisher and received no other compensation. The opinions expressed here are my own.


Our Very Own Dog: Taking Care of Your Very First Pet by Amanda McCardie

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Our Very Own Dog:
Taking Care of Your Very First Pet
Written by Amanda McCardie
Illustrated by Salvatore Rubbino
(Candlewick Press; $15.99, Ages 3-7)

 

Our Very Own Dog cover image

 

This week is National Pet-Sitters Week. Then, on March 23, it’s National Puppy Day, so let’s give a shout out to pets and puppy lovers and their caregivers everywhere!

Our Very Own Dog by Amanda McCardie is THE book to share with your children if you’re even just entertaining the idea of getting a pet. It’s also the perfect picture book to read once you’ve decided to welcome a new dog into your home. The story revolves around Sophie, once a shelter dog, and now starting over with her forever family. Written and illustrated in a gentle, accessible way, Our Very Own Dog will help children learn all about what’s involved in caring for and training man’s best friend. Whether that involves feeding them, taking them to the dog park to socialize or bathing them, McCardie has covered it all.

 

Interior spread from Our Very Own Dog: Taking Care of Your Very First Pet by Amanda McCardie with illustrations by Salvatore Rubbino, Candlewick Press ©2017.

 

What works wonderfully in this picture book is that kids will get to know Sophie and experience what she’s like at home and when she’s out and about as seen through the eyes of her young owner. And if Sophie’s forever family happens upon a dog show in the park, and Sophie happens to charm one of the judges, youngsters will not be disappointed Readers find out through Rubbino’s playful artwork and McCardie’s smaller sized text tips just what things new dogs are allowed to do (cuddle, play fetch, go for walks) and not allowed to do (steal sausages from the kitchen table, try to escape from being bathed) all the while being educated on important responsiblilities of a pet owner. The back matter in Our Very Own Dog contains a note on having your very own dog including illustrated examples of doggy body language. There are also recommended reads and an index making referring back to key points such as collars, grooming, walking and training as easy as saying “Sit,” “Stay,” “Come,” and “Heel.”

  • Reviewed by Ronna Mandel


Amanda McCardie
is the author of several books for young readers, most recently A Book of Feelings. She says, “Sophie is dear to my heart. She was the cheery, cheeky little dog I grew up with in real life.” Amanda McCardie lives in London.

Salvatore Rubbino is the award-winning illustrator of Just Ducks!, A Walk in London, A Walk in New York, and A Walk in Paris. He says, “I have always been fond of cats. But by studying dogs and watching their fascinating behavior, I now find that I love dogs, too!” Salvatore Rubbino lives in London.


Shackles From The Deep by Michael H. Cottman

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SHACKLES FROM THE DEEP:
Tracing the Path of a Sunken Slave Ship,
a Bitter Past, and a Rich Legacy
by Pulitzer Prize-winner Michael H. Cottman
(National Geographic Kids; $17.99, Ages 8-12)

Starred review – Booklist

cover image off Shackles From The Deep by Michael H. Cottman

 

A fascinating and fast read, Michael H. Cottman’s compelling Shackles From The Deep will open middle grade readers’ eyes and minds to the abhorrent “international business” that was the slave trade. In 22 brief but gripping chapters, Cottman, an avid scuba diver, goes in search of the dark history behind the 17th century slave ship called the Henrietta Marie. Through diving below the surface and delving above the surface with the help of a dedicated team of professionals, Cottman learns not only about “the bitter past” that shrouded the ship, but about himself and the African people forced into slavery who could very well have been his ancestors. 

Possibly the world’s oldest slave ship discovery, and certainly the oldest in North America, the Henrietta Marie and its bounty of watch bell, iron cannon, and iron shackles helped shed light on the inhumane industry that ripped West Africans from their homes, separated families, and brought them against their will to places such as Barbados and Jamaica to work on plantations. This slave ship, found accidentally while looking for a different wreck, had been torn apart during a hurricane off Key West in Florida in the 1700s. 

Cottman’s journey to find answers about the individuals who captained the ship, commissioned the ship’s slave cargo, and made the shackles and weapons on board led him to three continents over four years. And though he was never able to find definitive proof of who exactly might have been carried below deck in wretched conditions for months on end, Cottman did meet a family in Jamaica whose roots likely could be traced back to the Henrietta Marie if those records were available. One of the most moving parts of Shackles From The Deep was when Cottman travelled to Senegal and toured Gorée Island. There he visited the House of Slaves, built in 1526, and home to the infamous Door of No Return named as such because those enslaved Africans leaving through it never ever came back.

Cottman felt it was important to retrace the route the Henrietta Marie would have taken and, by taking us along with him as engaged readers, we quickly learn why. Tearing families apart and treating them like animals made no sense as one missionary’s account detailed:

The English take very little care of their slaves and feed them very badly …The overseers make them work
beyond measure and beat them mercilessly…and they seem to care less for the life of a Negro than a horse.

Ending his journey in Africa where it all began after those earlier visits to Barbardos, Jamaica and England, provided a way for Cottman to return through that Door of No Return on behalf of all the unfortunate souls who never had the chance. The story ends, having come full circle from the initial discovery, with the author’s visit to an underwater memorial at the wreckage site of the Henrietta Marie. 


“I had learned that the site of the wreck is a place where I am never really alone,
a place where I feel connected to my past and ancestors. I had learned that lasting
friendships can be forged––regardless of racial backgrounds––even while exploring a sunken slave ship.”

There are several ways for readers to approach this well-written narrative nonfiction novel. From the sheer storytelling perspective, it is completely absorbing and satisfying, in fact I read it in one sitting. As a page turning detective novel, it’s rich in detail with Cottman’s journalistic abilities highlighted as he asks the right questions and tracks down individuals around the globe to piece together the puzzle that is the Henrietta Marie. When children read Shackles From the Deep they will gain a better understanding of slavery and the dehumanization of people that was perpetrated for 300 years, and hopefully be the force to prevent such cruelty from ever happening again.

Click here to visit Michael H. Cottman’s website.

  • Reviewed by Ronna Mandel

 

 

 


Charlotte S. Huck Children’s Literature Festival 2017

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LOVE KIDLIT?

It’s time for the 21st Annual

March 3 & 4, 2017
at The University of Redlands,
Redlands, CA

 

I’m thrilled to share details about this year’s Charlotte S. Huck Children’s Literature Festival. I attended last year and it was absolutely an inspiring and rewarding two days! Register now and join the celebration of high-quality, award-winning children’s book creators working in a variety of genres—fiction, nonfiction, poetry, picture books, and novels. Meet People as passionate about children’s books as you are! Attend one day or both days, your choice. For updated information about the Festival and breakout sessions visit Charlotte Huck Festival online here

But, before you attend, take a look at who’s coming and how the best in kidlit is being celebrated!

Featured speakers: Brian Floca, Yuyi Morales, George Ella Lyon, J. Patrick Lewis, Pam Muñoz Ryan, Rebecca Davis, Lisa Von Drasek and David M. Schwartz – award winning innovative children’s book creators from all over the nation. Check their websites for more information about them and their books.

 

Breakout sessions offer attendees a mix of styles and views–something for everyone in each time slot. 


→Join George Ella Lyon and Festival Poet Laureate Kristine O’Connell George and explore “Where I’m From”– the importance of place and how it colors and informs our writing and our lives. They invite you to bring pictures or mementos that spark your own unique memories of place.


→In a Q & A titled “Ask Me (Almost) Anything” Tony Johnston, the award-winning author of more than 100 beloved children’s books, shares her writing and her books with a few secrets thrown in.

→Redlands author Diane Adams will lead a small group titled “Love Is… Writing for Children” and sign her books including the 2017 Love Is…

→California authors Carrie Arcos, Elana K. Arnold, Jeff Gottesfeld, Lois V. Harris, Henry Herz, Katherine Kottaras, Sarah Lariviere and Elizabeth Wong will lead small group sessions and sign their books.

→Booking Agent and author Carmen Oliver will lead a small group titled “Raising a Reader: Empowering Children Through the Magic of Books and Author Visits” and sign her book Bears Make the Best Reading Buddies.

→California author Diane White will sign her Beach Lane Book Blue on Blue.

→In place of their 2017 Spring Workshop, Children’s Literature Council of Southern California brings “Fighting Words”– one of their Youth Lit Salons–to the Festival on Saturday, March 4. This workshop for teachers, librarians, writers, parents and booksellers will cover two breakout session time slots.

Lisa Silverman and Annette Goldsmith welcome you to the world of IBBY– the International Board on Books for Young People“The Best Books You’ve Never Heard of from Around the Word addresses how we stay informed about excellent books from other countries.”

And there’s lots more so don’t miss out! 

For updated information about the Festival and breakout sessions
visit them online at www.redlands.edu/charlottehuckfestival
M
ention Good Reads With Ronna when you register for an extension through Saturday!

In addition to their Facebook page, find them on Twitter and Instagram @huckfestival 

Don’t forget to use their hashtag #huckfestival when you’re there experiencing the best in children’s literature!


Ordinary People Change The World: I am George Washington by Brad Meltzer

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ORDINARY PEOPLE CHANGE THE WORLD:
I AM GEORGE WASHINGTON
Written by Brad Meltzer
Illustrated by Christopher Eliopoulos
(Dial BYR; $12.99, Ages 5-8)

 

cover image of I am George Washington by Brad Meltzer

 

For Presidents’ Day 2017, let’s take a look at Brad Meltzer’s I am George Washington, another terrific biography in the popular and entertaining Ordinary People Change The World series. These books serve as a great introduction to some of the world’s greatest heroes and historical figures while emphasizing that individuals are not born into greatness but work hard to achieve it, earning the public’s trust, respect and admiration along the way. Each person depicted in the series has demonstrated proven leadership skills or unique knowledge making them worthy of inclusion.

The fourth of nine children, George Washington had great people skills, something needed in a large family, and eventually, to run a nascent country. Back when Washington was growing up, there was no U.S.A. yet, only colonies ruled by Great Britain. Readers will learn how Washington’s older brother Lawrence, fourteen years his senior, had a positive impact on his younger brother. In fact, a soldier himself, Lawrence influenced Washington’s decision to serve in the military. When his father died, Washington’s family could no longer “afford proper schooling so my brothers had to teach me at home.” At sixteen, Washington worked as a surveyor in the Shenandoah Valley with a wealthy family called the Fairfaxes. They treated him kindly and exposed him to the finer things in life. Yet, despite the opportunity to hobnob with the rich, Washington never forgot his roots and all the people less privileged than the Fairfaxes. He later fulfilled his childhood dream by joining the military, showing bravery and leadership in battle and being made “commander of all Virginia’s fighting forces.” George Washington also ran for office, and though he lost at his first attempt, he won all future elections.

 

George Washington Timeline from Ordinary People Change the World

Interior spread of George Washington Timeline from Ordinary People Change the World: I am George Washington by Brad Meltzer with illustrations by Christopher Eliopoulos, Dial Books ©2016.

 

When the American Revolution began in protest against high taxes imposed by Britain, “Our thirteen colonies decided we would fight together against King George III.” Washington was chosen to lead the battle. Cleverness, determination and unparalleled leadership helped the less experienced military of the colonies defeat the mighty British led, of course, by General George Washington. And the rest, of course is history, with Washington being selected as the first president of the United States of America.

What I love about Meltzer’s writing and Eliopoulos’ artwork is that they make learning about these important people so accessible, interesting and fun. Who doesn’t love seeing a miniature George Washington on every page or having him narrate his life’s story? Picking out the most relevant aspects of any individual’s life is never easy and to condense them into a picture book biography for elementary school aged kids and still be meaningful takes a lot of experience, something best-selling author Meltzer has lots of! The choice of Eliopoulos as illustrator is just icing on the cake and I cannot imagine this series with any other style artwork. And did I notice author Meltzer drawn into one spread near the end? See for yourself and let me know.

“Leadership doesn’t come from charisma or personality.
It comes from courage:
The courage to do what’s right.
The courage to serve others.
The courage to go first.”

And George Washington, the father of our country, had enough courage for an entire nation and we celebrate him today.

Ordinary People Change the World website
Brad Meltzer website
Christopher Eliopoulos website

  • Reviewed by Ronna Mandel