I Have a Balloon Written by Ariel Bernstein

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I HAVE A BALLOON
Written by Ariel Bernstein
Illustrated by Scott Magoon
(Paula Wiseman Books; $17.99, Ages 4-8)

 

I Have a Balloon cover illustration

 

It’s a clear and clever case of the balloon is always redder as opposed to the grass is always greener in Ariel Bernstein’s debut picture book, I Have a Balloon featuring illustrations by Scott Magoon. I absolutely adored this story because it not only took me back to my childhood, but reminded me of so many episodes I had to navigate with my children when the dreaded sharing demon reared its ugly head. I appreciated the slow, steady build up of this timeless tale that takes the dislike of sharing to humorous new heights.

Int spread of Owl with red balloon and monkey from I Have a Balloon

Interior spread from I Have a Balloon by Ariel Bernstein w/art by Scott Magoon, Paula Wiseman Books ©2018.

 

Owl’s got a lovely red balloon he’s pretty darned pleased with. Monkey would like it. Owl says no. Persistent in his pursuit, Monkey offers to trade something of his in return. Owl’s not interested. But it would make Monkey SO HAPPY! Forget about it! Forget the teddy bear Monkey’s willing to swap. Or the sunflower. Or for that matter, the robot or the hand drawn picture of ten balloons. No. No. No. Not a ball or a pin. But something about the sock with a star and a perfectly shaped hole seems to suck Owl in. Suddenly the play potential of this single sock is just so appealing that the tides turn. Following creative, circular prose, readers end up at a similar point from where the drama of this delightful book began.

From the playful book jacket flap copy spoiler alert of: This is NOT a book about sharing to Bernstein’s spot on prose pitting Owl and his special, it’s mine and I’m not sharing it red balloon vibe to Monkey’s earnest desire to possess said balloon, I couldn’t read this book fast enough to find out what happens. From Magoon’s subtle yet oh so successful depictions of the the pair’s interaction (check out Owl’s expressive eyes!) to the perfect (and sweet) finish, I Have a Balloon is wonderfully entertaining. In fact I can’t think of a parent, teacher, caregiver or relative who hasn’t encountered this exact situation. Tightly told, tongue-in-cheek, and relatable, I Have a Balloon is guaranteed to garner grins when shared with kids. A truly treat of a read!

Starred Review – Kirkus Reviews, Publishers Weekly

  • Reviewed by Ronna Mandel

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Paulie’s Passover Predicament by Jane Sutton

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PAULIE’S PASSOVER PREDICAMENT
Written by Jane Sutton
Illustrated by Barbara Vagnozzi
(Kar-Ben; $17.99 hardcover, $7.99 paperback, Ages 4-6)

 

Cover art for Paulie's Passover Predicament

 

I don’t have a flair for cooking and it seems the same can be said about the main character and moos-ician, Paulie, in Paulie’s Passover Predicament by Jane Sutton. As the Passover Seder host, Paulie gets all the important dishes wrong. But unlike me, Paulie scores points because he at least makes the effort to prepare an entire meal whereas I’m more comfortable (and it’s safer, too) being someone else’s Seder guest.

Paulie’s invited all his animal friends over which includes Evelyn, Horace, Irving, Moe and Sally. At first his pals seem impressed by his Passover Seder spread. Soon however, as each traditional dish is served, there are giggles, chuckles and guffaws. “I see you have an extremely large egg on your seder plate,” said Moe. How big you ask? It’s an Ostrich egg!

 

Int artwork from Paulie's Passover Predicament

Interior artwork and text from Paulie’s Passover Predicament © 2018 by Jane Sutton, Illustrations copyright © 2018 Lerner Publishing Group, Inc.

 

There’s pepper in the salt water that’s supposed to represent “the tears of our ancestors when they were slaves,” but Paulie’s put pepper in so the pepper wouldn’t be jealous of the salt. He’s mixed pine cones instead of walnuts into the charoset, uses grass in place of parsley, and for the maror he’s carved a horse out of a radish instead of using horseradish!! But rather than ridicule Paulie who is embarrassed and saddened by his mistakes, his pals realize he’s just put his own special spin on the seder and love him for it. Happy again, Paulie reflects on the special meal. “He loved dipping his hoof in grape juice as he and his friends recited The Ten Plagues.”

When Sally is selected to hide the afikomen, everyone goes searching. Lucky Paulie finds it but unluckily gets stuck in the basement until his ingenuity saves the day (and the afikomen). I like the symbolism in his being set free just like our ancestors were and the special camaraderie amongst all the friends afterwards as they sing Dayeinu. “If God had only taken us out of Egypt, it would have been enough. Dayeinu.”

Vagnozzi’s joyful artwork will delight youngsters, some of whom may be old enough to recite The Four Questions. Paulie’s Passover Predicament is a light-hearted look at the holiday and reinforces the message that it’s really not about the food, but about being together and honoring the traditions of the past generations. Enjoy your read-aloud time with this story and wishing all those who celebrate a very happy Passover 2018!

About Passover From Paulie’s Passover Predicament:
Passover is a spring holiday that celebrates the exodus of the Israelite slaves from Egypt. The holiday begins with a festive meal called a seder. Symbolic foods recall the bitterness of slavery, the haste in which the Jews left Egypt, and the joy of freedom. Children ask The Four Questions and look for the hidden piece of matzah—the afikomen—at the end of the meal.

 

  • Reviewed by Ronna Mandel

Click here for a link to 2017’s Passover book review of A Different Kind of Passover
Click here for a link to 2016’s Passover book review, More Than Enough

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What’s a Mother to do? My Pet Wants a Pet by Elise Broach

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MY PET WANTS A PET
Written by Elise Broach
Illustrated by Eric Barclay
(A Christy Ottaviano Book/Henry Holt BYR; $16.99, ages 4-7)

My Pet Wants a Pet by Elise Broach cover image

When I go to my local bookstore, I’m always on the lookout for a surprise–something new, that I haven’t heard of, that I know the kids in my book club (mostly 3- to 5-year-olds) will love. MY PET WANTS A PET, written by Elise Broach and illustrated by Eric Barclay is one of those books.

 

Interior illustrations by Eric Barclay from My Pet Wants a Pet

Interior artwork from My Pet Wants a Pet written by Elise Broach with illustrations by Eric Barclay, A Christy Ottaviano Book/Henry Holt BYR ©2018.

 

 

Broach’s story starts off in familiar territory. The main character wants a pet. He begs, and begs, and begs until, finally, his mother says YES! Barclay’s uncluttered, colorful illustrations show the boy and his new puppy playing, cuddling, riding a bike, and before long we leave familiar territory behind as the puppy realizes he wants a pet, too. Mom thinks this is a “terrible idea” but, puppy and boy prevail. And so it goes, throughout the whole story with one pet after another realizing that they, too, want something to care for. In each case, the pet chooses a pet that would, under normal circumstances, be considered a rival or–worse yet–food. But this is not a Jon Klassen book and no one gets eaten. The animals and insects are good to each other and when they do chase it’s “all in good fun.” Everyone is content, except one character–Mom. She progresses from concerned to harried to annoyed as more and more pets invade her house. (Look closely at the illustrations to see why!) The boy formulates a plan to console her, but I won’t tell you what it is. You’ll have to read the book!

 

Interior illustrations by Eric Barclay from My Pet Wants a Pet

Interior artwork from My Pet Wants a Pet written by Elise Broach with illustrations by Eric Barclay, A Christy Ottaviano Book/Henry Holt BYR ©2018.

 

Simple illustrations and an engaging story make MY PET WANTS A PET perfect for story time with a large group of kids. Even from several feet away, listeners will catch details in the illustrations that add humor and warmth to the story. And Broach’s text allows readers to anticipate what’s coming, but still manages to keep us on our toes. After all, we may think we know what’s going to happen, but when a bird takes a worm for a pet there’s no telling how things will end.

 

Interior illustrations by Eric Barclay from My Pet Wants a Pet

Interior artwork from My Pet Wants a Pet written by Elise Broach with illustrations by Eric Barclay, A Christy Ottaviano Book/Henry Holt BYR ©2018.

 

Click here for the publisher’s page to find a downloadable activity guide.
See another recent review by Colleen Paeff here.

 

  •  Reviewed by Colleen Paeff – Colleen lives in Los Angeles, California, where she writes fiction and nonfiction picture books. She hosts the monthly Picture Book Publisher Book Club and its companion blog, Picture Book Publishers 101. Look for her on Twitter @ColleenPaeff.