The Legend of Rock, Paper, Scissors by Drew Daywalt

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THE LEGEND OF ROCK, PAPER, SCISSORS
Written by Drew Daywalt
Illustrated by Adam Rex
(Balzer + Bray; $17.99, Ages 4-8)

 

Cover image from The Legend of Rock Paper Scissors by Drew Daywalt

 

The Legend of Rock, Paper, Scissors, a forty-eight-page picture book by Drew Daywalt (author of the best-selling Crayons books), has universal appeal and charismatic humor. The origins of this famous three-way clash are brilliantly explained.

We are introduced to mighty Rock, a fearless fighter who lives in “an ancient and distant realm called the Kingdom of the Backyard.” He’s feeling down because it’s no fun to win all the time. In encounters with a clothespin and an apricot, we see why this is a problem.

Meanwhile, clever Paper, from the Empire of Mom’s Home Office, is also an undefeated champ when tangling with enemies in his part of the house. Even the printer proves to be no equal—Paper effectively jams him up.

Speedy Scissors resides in the tiny village of Junk Drawer, but that doesn’t mean she won’t slay adversaries throughout the Kitchen Realm. It’s about time someone put an end to those dinosaur-shaped chicken nuggets; Scissors was up to the task, but, as with the other two great warriors, being victorious 24/7 sure can get old.

When the three meet, an epic encounter ensues with each participant bested by one of the others—a battle which, to this day, is still reenacted.

Daywalt’s rollicking text pairs seamlessly with best-selling author and illustrator Adam Rex’s art. The three protagonists project personality and charm, irresistible in their unique magnificence. Together, Daywalt and Rex make this story terrifically true. How else could Rock, Paper, Scissors have come into existence? Hail to this modern-day legend.

Click here for a printable activity.

Click here for a reading sample.

 

  • Reviewed by Christine Van Zandt

Writer, editor, and owner of Write for Success www.Write-for-Success.com

@WFSediting, Christine@Write-for-Success.com


The Girl Who Saved Yesterday by Julius Lester

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THE GIRL WHO SAVED YESTERDAY
Written by Julius Lester
Illustrated by Carl Angel
(Creston Books; $16.99, Ages 4-9 )

 

The_Girl_Who_Saved_Yesterday picture book cover

 

From the Newbery Honor award-winner and master storyteller Julius Lester comes his long-awaited picture book, The Girl Who Saved Yesterday. In this poetic myth, “when the people of the village sent the girl into the forest, it was the trees as ancient as breath who took her in and raised her.” The young girl, named Silence by the trees, is soon tasked with returning to her village to save all of the Yesterdays. Beyond this unusual instruction, the trees can give her no further detail.

The villagers feared that Silence would anger the mountain “which loomed like a memory no one could recall.” When Silence returned, the villagers watched her brave a mysterious night alone, where shafts of light from the mountain filled the sky and passed through her; the voices carried by the light were “all shrieking like bolts of lightning sharpened by hopelessness, and the very land shook as if it were sobbing.” The girl realizes she must return to the forgotten place and find her parents.

In this beautifully written book, Silence recognizes the sounds of an unloved heart. Determination takes her to the mountain’s top; there she discovers the source of sadness and understands how to end the illness which had befallen this land.

Lester’s poetic lines are complemented by Angel’s bright, expressive images that help young readers understand the heart of this story: you cannot have Today without Yesterday. Once the ancestors’ memories are found, the spirits “encircled the people of the village, holding them in an embrace as gentle as eternity.”

  • Reviewed by Christine Van Zandt

Writer, editor, and owner of Write for Success www.Write-for-Success.com

@WFSediting, Christine@Write-for-Success.com

Co-editor of and writer for SCBWI’s Kite Tales https://SCBWIKiteTales.wordpress.com/


My Pen Pal, Santa by Melissa Stanton

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My Pen Pal, Santa, by Melissa Stanton with illustrations by Jennifer A. Bell (Random House Books for Young Readers, $9.99, Ages3-7), is reviewed by MaryAnne Locher.

My Pen Pal, Santa cover art by Jennifer A. Bell

My Pen Pal, Santa by Melissa Stanton with illustrations by Jennifer A. Bell, Random House Books for Young Readers, 2013.

There are few things in this world that make me happier than Christmas. I don’t get aggravated by retailers who advertise earlier every year. Nor do I get annoyed by the local radio station that plays Christmas music beginning mid-November. I love the traditions of the holiday, both religious and commercial. I also love the food, festivities, and of course, Santa Claus. So, when I came across My Pen Pal, Santa  written by Melissa Stanton and illustrated by Jennifer A. Bell, I knew this was a book I was meant to review. After all, how many of you can say the only songs you have ever downloaded from iTunes are of the Christmas variety?

Six year old Ava writes a thank you note to Santa Claus after Christmas. In it she asks him a couple of important questions, such as, “Why didn’t you eat the cookies I left you?” While Santa is certainly surprised to get a letter after Christmas, he nonetheless sends off a response answering Ava’s questions. He even signs his letter Merry Christmas! So begins a monthly correspondence between jolly old St. Nick and the little girl.

I enjoyed how many of my (I mean children’s) concerns were answered throughout this charmingly illustrated book. Does Santa know the tooth fairy? What about the Easter Bunny? What do he and Mrs. Claus do during the off season? Most importantly, for those of us without fireplaces, how does Santa deliver presents to children without chimneys? We (I mean kids) need to know this stuff, right?  My Pen Pal, Santa even addresses believers and non-believers in an open and loving way.

Parents, see what magic happens when you read this book with your child. It’s just perfect for a 3-7 year old who might already be questioning Santa’s existence, but still wants to believe. And who doesn’t?

Click here for Santa Stationery created by Jennifer A. Bell.