Beatrice Zinker, Upside Down Thinker – A Giveaway Courtesy of Disney-Hyperion!

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A REVIEW & GIVEAWAY
FOR
BEATRICE ZINKER, UPSIDE DOWN THINKER
by Shelley Johannes

Disney-Hyperion sent Good Reads With Ronna a copy to check out,
and we’re delighted they’re partnering with us for the giveaway!

Beatrice Zinker, Upside Down Thinker cover image

Read the review then scroll down to enter the giveaway today!

 

REVIEW:
In Shelley Johannes’s charming debut, Beatrice Zinker, Upside Down Thinker, the main character is appealing in a cute and quirky way. She’s someone whose personality will no doubt resonate with many different thinkers when they see themselves reflected on the pages of this delightful new chapter book series for tweens and pretweens.

Beatrice approaches life from a creative and different perspective. In other words, she does her best thinking upside down. Up until third grade, this singular skill has been accepted, even rewarded by her school teachers. But things are about to change as the summer of second grade ends and it’s time to head back to school. Not one to make promises easily unless it’s very important (a running sight gag throughout this illustrated story), and involves her BFF Lenny Santos, Beatrice is dressed and ready for third grade in her ninja attire as was agreed upon when second grade ended. The outfits signified the girls’ participation in a secret plan called Operation Upside that was supposed to be put into action on day one. Then why does Lenny, unrecognizable in pink instead of her brother’s black hand-me-downs, seem to have forgotten? Maybe her new friend and neighbor Chloe has something to do with it and that’s why they’ve also chosen desks right next to each other! Beatrice, on the other hand, has to sit up front, under the watchful eyes of the strict Mrs. Tamarack.

Beatrice is determined to find a way to convince Lenny to reconsider the mission when it’s obvious that, with Chloe now in the picture, the stealth operation has been put on hold. Being an upside down thinker, Beatrice develops an unusual and risky plan that winds up including a dangerous fall and a clandestine visit to the staff room, something no ordinary student could ever concoct. Will Beatrice win back her friend and give Operation Upside a reboot? It seems there’s a lot at stake for this thoughtful third grader whose resilience is demonstrated in the most original ways, and who is certain to inspire young readers rooting for her success.

Johannes does a terrific job of engaging readers right from The Very Beginning, the title of Chapter One. Young Beatrice is hanging onto a branch in the first of many marvelous illustrations “created with felt-tip pen, brush marker, and colored pencil on tracing paper,” and using only black, grays and orange. And it works wonderfully. There’s occasional rhyme and an easy flow from chapter to chapter in this 155-page book kids should breeze through. The problem-solving and different thinker theme is age appropriate and should encourage interesting conversations about creativity, inclusiveness and friendship. The 20 chapters are short and Johannes makes sure there are no loose ends which can sure get in the way if you’re an upside down thinker! I’m eager to see what this amiable tween who marches to her own drummer gets up to in Book#2.

  • Reviewed by Ronna Mandel

GENERAL DETAILS:
Beatrice Zinker, Upside Down Thinker
By Shelley Johannes
Release September 19, 2017
Recommended chapter book for ages 7-10

ABOUT THE BOOK …
Beatrice does her best thinking upside down.

Hanging from trees by her knees, doing handstands . . . for Beatrice Zinker, upside down works every time. She was definitely upside down when she and her best friend, Lenny, agreed to wear matching ninja suits on the first day of third grade. But when Beatrice shows up at school dressed in black, Lenny arrives with a cool new outfit and a cool new friend. Even worse, she seems to have forgotten all about the top-secret operation they planned!

Can Beatrice use her topsy-turvy way of thinking to save the mission, mend their friendship, and flip things sunny-side up?

ABOUT THE AUTHOR …
Shelley Johannes previously spent ten years in architecture—
where she fell in love with felt-tip pens, tracing paper, and the
greatness of black turtlenecks. She lives in Michigan with her husband
and two sons. Beatrice Zinker, Upside Down Thinker is the first book
she’s written. Find her online at shelleyjohannes.com.

 

 

FIND OUT MORE:
Visit the Official Site here.
Follow Disney-Hyperion on Twitter and Instagram
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Hashtags #BeatriceZinker #UpsideDownThinker

GIVEAWAY DETAILS:
Be An Upside Down Thinker!
One (1) winner receives:
Copy of Beatrice Zinker, Upside Down Thinker
And branded pencil case and notepad!

Open to US addresses only.
Prizing and samples provided by Disney-Hyperion.
This giveaway ends 10/12/17 12:00am PT so don’t wait! Enter today
for your chance to win a copy and cool BZUDT swag!

a Rafflecopter giveaway


The Case of the Poached Egg: A Wilcox & Griswold Mystery by Robin Newman

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THE CASE OF THE POACHED EGG:
A WILCOX & GRISWOLD MYSTERY
Written by Robin Newman
Illustrated by Deborah Zemke
(Creston Books; $15.95, Ages 4-8)

 

 

You’re eggspecting me to make yolks about this book, right? So here goes!

Eggceptionally funny, Robin Newman’s second Wilcox & Griswold mystery called The Case of the Poached Egg, will completely satisfy fans who’ve been hungry for a new installment following the duo’s Kirkus-starred first caper, The Case of the Missing Carrot Cake.

The trench coat garbed Captain Griswold and the narrator Detective Wilcox are mice on the move. MFIs (Missing Food Inspectors) have to be. It’s an animals steal food kind of world. Always seeking justice for the over 100 creatures on Farmer Ed’s Farm, this pair will stop at nothing to crack a case. So, after taking an urgent call from Henrietta Hen upset over the apparent egg-napping of her “precious Penny,” Wilcox summons his superior to accompany him to the crime scene.

This 48-paged early chapter book not only breaks down the tale into six easily readable chapters, it also cleverly divides actions/events into time and place. For example, Wilcox and Griswold begin their investigation at 10:30am, at the Chicken Coop. There they not only encounter a distraught Henrietta, but an unusually written ransom note too. The game is afoot! I mean an egg! I mean, read on!

The determined MFIs uncover a motive and eventually a culprit, just in the nick of time, using the process of elimination, mounting clues such as a bunch of farm animals oversleeping, a red goose herring (!), thorough questioning of witnesses and possible suspects, and hand writing analysis. All this, which takes place against the backdrop of Farmer Ed’s Big Speggtacular, plus, the cast of colorful characters caught up in the shenanigans including Gabby Goose, Colonel Peck, Miss Rabbit and Porcini Pig makes for amusing dialogue as readers try to solve the mystery along with Wilcox and Griswold. And though, as an adult, I solved the case early on, kids will eat up the chance to play detective and read between the lines, something the format of this clever police procedural actively encourages.

I’m always pulled into a story when there’s a map included, and illustrator Zemke’s created a super one. Her expressive illustrations work wonderfully to add action and emotion to this humorous and accessible story, while also making the thought of reading a chapter book not as daunting for the younger crowd! NOTE: Parents who may read this book aloud should not miss the legal disclaimer on the front endpapers or the author’s note beginning with  “No eggs, chickens, geese or roosters were harmed …”  I’m ready for another serving of Wilcox & Griswold, yes, ready indeed!

 

  • Reviewed by Ronna Mandel

 

 


Hans Christian Andersen’s The Snow Queen, Retold.

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The Snow Queen
Retold by Sarah Lowes and illustrated by Miss Clara
Barefoot Books; $9.99; Chapter book for ages 8 and up

The Snow Queen
Translated by Anthea Bell and illustrated by Yana Sedova
Minedition; $19.99; Picture book for ages 5 and up

To those in the USA who are busy surviving snow storms and blizzards, winter might seem like a curse. For those who are stifling under drought conditions, snow must seem like a fleeting, magical element. The Snow Queen by Hans Christian Andersen combines the danger and wonder of snow in an imaginative tale. When a shard of an evil mirror pierces his eye, Kay sees only the bad in the world. This makes him easy prey for the Snow Queen, who kidnaps him. Kay’s best friend Gerda decides to rescue him. To do so, she must set out on a long and arduous journey where she encounters talking birds and animals, magical flowers, an enchantress, a robber girl, and a princess. Gerda’s love for her friend is her greatest help, and she battles the bitter cold to reach the Snow Queen’s icy palace. There, Gerda frees Kay from his frozen heart and the Snow Queen’s grasp.

It’s little wonder that this fantastical story continues to be retold, even 171 years after its original publication. Here are two retellings of this tale of friendship and courage.

The Snow Queenthesnowqueen_pb_w
Retold by Sarah Lowes and illustrated by Miss Clara
Barefoot Books: Step Inside A Story; $9.99

With “accelerated vocabulary and complex sentence structure for the confident reader,” Barefoot Books presents its adapted version as a chapter book for ages eight and up. At 64 pages within seven chapters, the book is a good length for that age group. Here’s a taste of this exciting story:

The bags of provisions were taken and Gerda was dragged from the saddle. Her arms were pinned behind her, and a bony robber with bristling eyebrows and a hairy chin prodded and poked at her new clothes. “Quite the little lady…” he murmured as he drew his sharp dagger and held it to her throat.

“No!” shouted a clear, commanding young voice.

What I greatly enjoyed about this version was the evocative art by French artist, Miss Clara. Whimsical illustrations produce an ethereal sense of people and places. The jacket description states that Miss Clara first creates maquettes (scale models of unfinished sculptures), which she then photographs. Next, she works on those images digitally. The results are simply beautiful and captivating. I also enjoyed the tangible feel of the book. The cover is made of thicker paper than most chapter books, as are the pages. This made the book in its own way feel more appropriate for chapter book readers, as if they are being recognized as older and entrusted with weightier books. In addition, Barefoot Books states that “we source paper from sustainably managed forests,” which adds to the appeal.

TheSnowQueenBB-Int.jpg

Interior spread from The Snow Queen retold by Sarah Lowes with illustrations by Miss Clara, Barefoot Books, ©2011.

 

 

The Snow Queen
TheSnowQueen.jpg
Translated by Anthea Bell and illustrated by Yana Sedova
Minedition; $19.99

Minedition presents its version of The Snow Queen as a picture book for ages 5 and up. Also 64 pages, this edition features large print for easy reading. Here’s the same sample as above:

They seized the horses, killed the coachman, footman and outriders, and dragged Gerda out of the carriage. “Oh, doesn’t she look tender and plump,” said the old robber woman who had a beard and bristly eyebrows. “This little girl will taste good!” And she brought out a sharp, shiny knife. But then she screamed, “Ouch!”… “Oh no, you don’t,” said the little robber girl.

Again, the art work is a huge draw for the book. The icy tones of the multiple shades of blue, silver, and green capture the feel of the cold and the iciness of the Snow Queen’s heart. The illustrations seem delicate and powerful at the same time.

The Snow Queen is a classic, and both versions are excellent versions that will fascinate children.

– Reviewed by Rita Zobayan


Humphrey’s Really Wheely Racing Day & Humphrey’s Playful Puppy Problem by Betty G. Birney

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Everyone’s Favorite Classroom Pet, Humphrey, is Back in New Tiny Tales

 

Humphrey’s Really Wheely Racing Day & Humphrey’s Playful Puppy Problem
Written by Betty G. Birney and Illustrated by Priscilla Burris
(Putnam Juvenile, Paperback $4.99, Ages 5-8)

How do you introduce a younger age group to the adventures and antics of America’s popular classroom pet? With Humphrey’s Tiny Tales, a new chapter book series created for the K-3 crowd by Betty G. Birney.  A step up from easy readers, the first two books in the series are sure to attract a legion of devoted fans.

Humphrey-reallywheely-cvr.jpgBirney’s award-winning middle grade novels are a mainstay on reading lists across the country so it’s no surprise that both author and publisher would want to share beloved teacher Mrs. Brisbane’s insightful and friendly hamster with chapter book readers. Featuring shorter page counts, delightful illustrations, fewer characters and easier reading level, Humphrey’s Really Wheely Racing Day (Book No. 1) and Humphrey’s Playful Puppy Problem (Book No. 2) are perfect for holiday break time when reading is not high on many kids’ lists.

In Humphrey’s Really Wheely Racing Day, (Book No. 1), our “positive role model,” rodent is rolling all right! After trying his hamster friend, Winky’s, auto, Humphrey wants a really wheely car, too. A hamster wheel and a ball are okay, but an automobile’s extra exciting, especially when Mrs. Brisbane gets one for Humphrey. Everyone’s even more surprised to learn that Humphrey will be racing against Don’t Complain-Mandy Payne’s pet hamster, Winky, for all the school to see!

Humphrey-playfupuppy-cvr.jpgIn Humphrey’s Playful Puppy Problem (Book No. 2), Richie Rinaldi (school custodian Aldo’s nephew) has Humphrey for the weekend and plans to use him in his science experiment. While Humphrey fears being turned into “Humphrey-stein,” it’s GREAT-GREAT-GREAT when he realizes he’s just going to be timed on his wheel. What he doesn’t like is the WOOF-WOOF-WOOF of Richie’s puppy Poppy with her wet nose and sharp teeth getting too close for comfort. Will she figure out how to open his cage’s lock-that-doesn’t-lock? Will Humphrey save Richie’s experiment so it’s a DING-DING-DING success? Read how a helpful, happy hamster makes everything right.

Coming this spring, Humphrey’s Creepy-Crawly Camping Adventure

– Reviewed by Ronna Mandel


Annie and Simon: The Sneeze and Other Stories by Catharine O’Neill

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Annie and Simon: The Sneeze and Other Stories by Catharine O’Neill is reviewed by Dornel Cerro.

Starred Review – Kirkus
Annie-Simon-Sneeze-cvr.jpg

Cheerful and talkative Annie, and her big brother Simon are back for another adventure in Annie and Simon: The Sneeze and Other Stories written and illustrated by Catharine O’Neill (Candlewick Press, $15.99, Ages 3-8). Each of the four short stories in this second volume focuses on the two very different, yet loving, siblings, delivering gentle messages about relationships, perspective, caring, and sharing.

“Living Things” is a perfect introduction to both characters. The wise-beyond-his years Simon uses his binoculars to observe nature at the lake, while Annie draws what she sees – or thinks she sees. Her scribbly drawings are not always accurate and what she believes she knows isn’t necessarily true. An exchange about frogs is humorous and telling:

“Knees? Frogs with knees? Oh, Simon. Tee-hee.  Tee-hee.  Tee-hee.”

“Good grief,” said Simon. (p. 5).

Under Simon’s patient tutelage, Annie begins to understand more of the world around her than just what she sees or thinks she knows.

In “The Sneeze,” Annie wants to take care of a sick Simon, but needs his help to do so.

Annie loves cats because they purr and tries to teach her dog Hazel to purr in “Hazel, Hazel, Hazel.” However, when she spies something dangling from a cat’s mouth, a horrified Annie decides that Hazel should just be a dog.

In “Horse Chestnuts,” Annie and Simon find a squirrel has taken made off with their chestnuts. When Annie learns from Simon that the squirrel will need the chestnuts for the winter, she agrees to share.

The quietly-paced stories reveal the strong bond between Annie and Simon despite their differences. O’Neill’s soft and colorful watercolor illustrations are endearing and perfectly complement the warm and inviting stories. Use this as a read aloud for preschoolers, share it with siblings who don’t get along, and give it to beginning readers who are fans of Arnold Lobel’s Frog and Toad series and James Howe’s Houndsley and Catina series (also published by Candlewick). Visit the publisher’s page for more information on this book and links to other books by Catharine O’Neill.


Minnie & Moo: Hooves of Fire Written and Illustrated by Denys Cazet

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Minnie and Moo, the popular bovine buddies, are back again in their second chapter book reviewed today by MaryAnne Locher.

hoovesThis time the two lovable cows are having a frolicking good time on the Red Tractor Farm in Minnie & Moo: Hooves of Fire, written and illustrated by Denys Cazet (Creston Books 2014; $15.95, Ages 6-11). Well, at least Moo is having a good time. Minnie is too busy worrying.

While Mr. and Mrs. Farmer are away on a vacation. Moo comes up with the idea to have a talent festival on the farm to raise money for the Farmers. Minnie has a bad feeling about this, but doesn’t want to hurt her best friend’s feelings, so she goes along with it. But everywhere she turns, Minnie sees trouble brewing. All that Moo sees is everyone having fun! Minnie notices coyotes in black jackets who ride in on motorcycles, weasels looking, well, weasel-y, and the stage-hog, Elvis the Rooster, who can’t seem to wait his turn. Moo sees her friends’ hard work and talent coming to fruition.

When Minnie, a pastry lover of the worst sort, thinks she sees the coyotes stealing raspberry danishes, she tells her friend Moo, who replies, “You worry too much, Minnie.”  That’s because Moo thinks she has everything under control since Big Vinnie and Little Vinnie, professional hog wrestlers, are there as security guards.

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Interior art from Minnie & Moo: Hooves of Fire by Denys Cazet, Creston Books, ©2014.

Soon though, even Moo gets a little concerned when she can’t find Minnie, or the cash box holding all of their money intended for the Farmers. The money box shows up as part of Fox’s magic trick; or does it? When coyotes, hyenas, weasels, and a fox all collaborate to pull off a heist, they’re too much for even Big Vinnie and Little Vinnie to handle alone. When a hyena yells, “So long, Fatso!” to Minnie, the hyena doesn’t know what’s in store for him. A motorcycle chase ensues, and well, let’s just say that Mr. and Mrs. Farmer get a fat envelope full of cash in their mailbox.

Cazet is no stranger to elementary school humor, having been a teacher himself for 25 years, a school librarian, and an elementary media specialist. His b&w illustrations of cows in togas, chickens in dresses and heels, and a stare-down between a bug-eyed snail and an Elvis-impersonating rooster, are very amusing. His words even more so. There’s drama, comedy, magic, and even a touch of romance, when Don Juan del Toro, the bull, asks Moo to dance The Hooves of Fire.

Teachers should note, there’s also a downloadable Curriculum Guide.