Gobble, Gobble, Tucker! by Leslie McGuirk

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Gobble, Gobble, Tucker! by Leslie McGuirk
(Candlewick Press, $7.99, Ages 2-5)

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We know you’re looking forward to Thanksgiving, but who else do you think is eagerly awaiting the holiday meal? Man’s best friend, who in this case happens to be Tucker, an adorable white terrier so well behaved you’ll want him at your home, too.

Tucker smells the aromas of Thanksgiving, primarily turkey, and naturally is close at hand during preparations for the dinner, just in case “… someone drops some food!”  He’s helpful and friendly to arriving guests of both the human and canine variety. Tucker can resist the temptation of turkey and taters, but not his cousins. Tiger and Murphy beg and whimper for a taste to no avail. When at last mealtime comes, the dogs “wait patiently while everyone eats.” The spread, with three doggie derrieres visible from under the tablecloth, is irresistible and will garner giggles galore from your youngsters for sure. With mealtime over, man’s best friends get to chow down leftovers to their hearts’ content then drift off to sleep already looking forward to the following Thanksgiving.

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Interior artwork from Gobble, Gobble, Tucker! by Leslie McGuirk, Candlewick Press ©2014.

This 32-page board book with its simple artwork and bright bold colors feels like a wonderful cross between Todd Parr and Lucy Coussins. Sentences are kept at one or two per spread to keep even the littlest listeners engaged. When Tucker and his pals finally tuck into some savory treats, kids will be delighted that no one was left out of the holiday feast.

- Reviewed by Ronna Mandel

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WINTERFROST by Michelle Houts

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WINTERFROST written by Michelle Houts
(Candlewick, $16.99, Ages 8-12 )

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Michelle Hout’s WINTERFROST brings readers to the forests of Denmark for a sweet fantasy adventure that is perfect for the holiday season.

The Larsen family Christmas celebration takes an unexpected turn when the parents are called away, leaving 12-year-old Bettina in charge of the farm and her 1-year-old sister, Pia, for a few days. Bettina, a mature and responsible girl, is undaunted by the challenge. She’s confident that she can manage alone, especially since nothing ever happens on the sleepy island of Lolland in mid-winter.

But in the hustle and bustle of preparations, the family forgets to leave a bowl of warm, bubbling rice pudding in the barn on Christmas. Just as many families leave cookies for Santa, the Danes leave rice pudding for the nisse, tiny kind and clever elves who tend the livestock and stoke the fires. Klakke, the Larsen’s young and curious nisse, is hurt and resentful of the family’s forgetfulness, so he steals baby Pia from her carriage as she naps in the sunshine.

Bettina begins a frantic hunt for the baby until darkness falls. Unable to sleep, she finds a long-forgotten book belonging to her grandfather entitled How to Care for and Keep Your Nisse. From the book, Bettina learns that a disgruntled nisse might resort to mischief. Suddenly, she realizes that the forgotten bowl of rice pudding may have been the indirect cause of Pia’s disappearance.

Bettina’s belief in the nisse tenuously restored, she heads into the forest to look for Pia and enters a fantastic world of mythology and Danish folklore. Fans of tiny people stories like The Borrowers or The Littles will delight in the details that Houts incorporates, such as walnut shell chairs, firefly lanterns, and thistledown socks. The creative and unusual setting is a charming springboard for Bettina’s nisse adventures, following her as she flies on the neck of a goose, then a seagull, seeking a way to free her sister from a long-standing nisse family feud.

Hout’s unique, imaginative tale is a whimsical read for those just stepping into chapter books. The Nordic setting adds a fun twist to the fantasy adventure, and the brave, clever Bettina is an engaging heroine who thinks on her feet. Wrap up WINTERFROST as a perfect gift for young readers to enjoy during a snowy winter school vacation!

– Reviewed by Cathy Ballou Mealey 

Where Obtained:  I reviewed a promotional copy of WINTERFROST from the publisher and received no compensation. The opinions expressed here are my own.

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Winter Candle by Jeron Ashford

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Winter Candle by Jeron Ashford
with illustrations by Stacey Schuett
(Creston Books, 2014. $16.95, Ages 4-11)

“What do you do when your celebration needs a candle, but yours are all gone?”

winter-candle-cvr.jpgNana Clover needs a candle for her Thanksgiving meal. The Danziger family forgot to get a havdalah candle. The fifth candle on Kirsten’s St. Lucia crown broke. Donte’s baby brother, Jamila cheerfully eats the Faith candle for the Kwanzaa kinara. How will Faruq and Nasreen’s father find their new apartment during a power outage?

A ” … bumpy, drooping candle” is passed from one neighbor to the next in a close knit and supportive apartment community. At first, the candle is seen as quite ugly. Kirsten worries that everyone will laugh at her if she uses it in her crown. Donte wonders how his family will be able to “… talk about faith with that sorry thing…” The Danziger children complain that it is not braided and only has one wick. Grandpa Danziger, hushing his grandchildren, tells them ” … a candle is blessed by what it does, not by how it looks. It’ll shine.”

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Interior artwork from Winter Candle by Jeron Ashford with illustrations by Stacey Schuett, Creston Books, ©2014.

Sure enough, when lit, the “frumpy” little candle glows more brightly and seems to last longer than other candles. All the celebrations go through without a hitch. Nasreen and Faruq are able to use it to guide their father to their new apartment where all the neighbors have gathered to welcome the family.

A lovely and heartwarming story for the holidays (and everyday) about sharing, caring, and supporting others’ needs and traditions.

Schuett’s rich illustrations glow as warmly and as brightly as the story’s candle.

Author Ashford concludes with a brief note about the holidays mentioned in her story.

Visit Creston Books to read more about the award-winning author and illustrator. This story has many wonderful curriculum connections: research, writing, crafts and more. Please see the excellent curriculum and activity guide the publisher created for this book.

– Reviewed by Dornel Cerro

 

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